Seminars & Workshops
Collaboration Planning for Writing a Competitive Team Science Proposal

What is a collaboration plan, and how can you use it to write a successful grant proposal and build a sustainable research team?

Evidence of a well-founded approach to scientific collaboration and research project management is increasingly required by funders and a focus of reviewer attention.

This two-part workshop, jointly offered by Tufts CTSI and Tufts University’s Office of the Vice Provost for Research, is designed to help researchers developing multi-investigator and cross-disciplinary collaborations to structure their funding proposals and set plans for a successful project start. Participants will be introduced to the comprehensive Collaborative Planning Approach developed at the NIH on the basis of research on the key factors that influence the success of a science team. Although geared to NIH applications, the workshop will draw on diverse case studies and prepare participants to apply the techniques and tools presented to craft multi-investigator proposals and build cohesive research teams in any scientific domain.

Topics covered will include:

  • Elements of a collaboration plan
  • Developing your rationale for a team approach
  • Building your team
  • Understanding collaboration readiness
  • Convergence and cross-disciplinarity in team functioning.

Featured Speakers

Amy Gantt, MA, Director, Office of Proposal Development, Office of the Vice Provost for Research, Tufts University

Susan Lewis, PhD, Associate Director, Team Science & Interdisciplinary Research, Office of the Vice Provost for Research, Tufts University

Cheryl London, DVM, PhD, DACVIM, Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Education, Tufts University Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine and Director of Research Collaborations, Tufts CTSI

Anna Ponzi Dalby, ABD, Senior Research Development Specialist, Office of the Vice Provost for Research, Tufts University

Learning Objectives

After attending this event, participants should be able to:

  • Describe the elements of a collaboration plan and their intersections with writing a competitive team science proposal
  • Explain how the elements of a collaboration plan apply to building a successful and sustainable team
  • Differentiate between plans for ‘taskwork’ and ‘teamwork’
  • Identify strategies for integrating and co-producing knowledge.

Who should attend

Investigators at all levels, currently working on or hoping to develop multi-investigator research projects, as well as research staff and others responsible for supporting collaborative projects.

Time Commitment and Expectations for Attendees

Participants are expected to attend both 90-minute sessions and actively engage in breakout discussions and practice exercises.

This workshop is provided free of charge and is open to faculty and staff of Tufts University, Tufts Medical Center, and Tufts CTSI partner institutions.

Details

Thursday, January 20 and Thursday, January 27, 2022
10:00-11:30AM
Online via Zoom (a link will be sent to those who register).

Registration

To attend, please enroll here via Tufts CTSI I LEARN by January 6, 2022.

For further information, please email Hannah Santos, MBA.

 

 

 

Seminars & Workshops
Conflict in Research Teams: Prevention, Management, and Resolution

Would you like to learn how to manage conflict as a member or leader of a team-based research project?

In collaborative research, conflict is inevitable. As individuals with diverse perspectives, backgrounds, and personalities undergo the stages of team formation, differences in goals, working styles, and expectations emerge. Failing to address these differences can derail a promising research idea and fracture collaborative relationships.

Learn the strategies to anticipate and overcome conflict in your research from a Team Science methodology in Conflict in Research Teams: Prevention, Management, and Resolution. In this two-session, live online workshop, you’ll hear about common areas of conflict in research teams, learn about frameworks for understanding, discussing, and managing conflict, and practice these skills through role-playing.

Learning objectives

After attending this event, participants should be able to:

  • Assess the state of conflict in their own teams.
  • Describe how a high-functioning team manages conflict effectively.
  • Employ tools and practices to anticipate and resolve common areas of conflict in research teams.

Who should attend

Faculty and research team members who currently work on team-based research projects, or plan to do so in the future, are encouraged to attend.

Details

Monday, April 26 and Monday, May 3, 2021
2:00-4:00PM
Online via Zoom (a link will be sent to those who register).

Registration

To attend, please enroll here via Tufts CTSI I LEARN by April 25.

*If you have not already registered for Tufts CTSI I LEARN, you will be asked to create an account, which can be used to register for all future Tufts CTSI sponsored workshops, courses, and events. If you are not sure whether you have an account, please email training@tuftsctsi.org.

 

Seminars & Workshops
Foundations of Team Science Workshop

Are you an investigator interested in learning practical skills for working on team-based research projects?


Contemporary biomedical and health research grants often involve more than a single principal investigator (PI) or working with the lab down the hall. Whether focused on a public health strategy or a novel treatment, scientists increasingly find they need to work as part of a team with collaborators from different disciplines, institutions, and communities.

To help researchers succeed in a team-based environment, Tufts Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI) and the Tufts University Office of Research Development are offering a workshop on team science fundamentals. Developed with the assistance ofthe Tufts Technology Services Design Practice, the intensive four-hour training provides an evidence-based framework for effective collaboration planning. Participants will gain practical skills for building cohesive teams and strategies that are adaptable to diverse research domains and settings.

By the end of this interactive symposium, event participants should be able to:

  • Understand the importance of team science skills to successful research outcomes
  • Understand the team science competencies needed for building new research teams
  • Use tools and strategies for:
    • Formulating shared goals and vision
    • Understanding individual contributions, opportunities for collaboration, and gaps within the team
    • Creating a collaboration plan.

Details

Wednesday, September 30, 2020, 10:00 –11:30AM, and
Wednesday, October 7, 2020, 10:00am –noon.

Location: Online via Zoom (a link will be emailed to those who register).

This workshop is open to faculty and research staff at any level. The curriculum is designed to be useful to new and experienced investigators, including seasoned PIs interested in developing program- or center-level proposals.

This will be a two-part workshop for a total of three-and-one-half hours. Registrants are expected to attend both parts A and B, and complete a short (20-30 minute) homework assignment between the sessions.

This is the first workshop in a series that Tufts CTSI will be offering on Team Science. Participants will be able to join any or all at no cost.

Registration

To attend, please register here by September 23, 2020.

Agenda – Part A, September 30

  • 10:00AM: Welcome: Defining Team Science and the Need for a Team-Based Approach
  • 10:15AM: Team Science Competencies and Strategies Overview
  • 10:30AM: Individual Collaboration Readiness
  • 10:45AM: Milestone Brainstorm
  • 11:00AM: Prepare for Part B Grand Challenge Scenario
  • 11:15AM: Wrap-up

Agenda – Part B, October 7

  • 10:00AM: Review and Introduction to Grand Challenge Scenario
  • 10:15AM: Breakout Groups: Shared Visions Statements and Milestones
  • 11:15AM: Report Out
  • 11:25AM: Collaboration Plan Demonstration
  • 11:45AM: Wrap-up

Tufts CTSI Professional Education & Expectations for Course Participants

Tufts CTSI’s Professional Education programs provide non-degree continuing education and training for clinical and translational research professionals from all Tufts CTSI partners and beyond.

Course enrollment priority is given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions. If your participation needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may provide their contact information when you register for the program.

This course is provided free of charge and is supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Award Number UL1TR002544.  The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

Seminars & Workshops
Knowing Yourself & Knowing Others: Implications for Leadership and Team Participation

How well do you know yourself? Find out how your approach to the world influences your motivation, leadership, and team participation at Knowing Yourself and Knowing Others: Implications for Leadership and Team Participation.

This workshop by Laurel K. Leslie, MD, MPH, former Tufts CTSI Associate Director for Community Engagement and current Vice President of Research at the American Board of Pediatrics Research, was previously offered in the Women in Medicine/Science Lecture Series and as part of the Community Service Learning Series for medical students.

To learn more about yourself and your interactions with others at this interactive and fun event, please register.

Friday, January 15, 2016, 3:00 – 5:00PM
Tufts Center for Medical Education, Room 114
145 Harrison Avenue, Boston MA

Or via live, interactive webcast (a link will be provided to those who register).

Seminars & Workshops
Managing Yourself Before Managing Others

Is your team working together effectively?

The success of all organizations depends upon how well members work. As research becomes more interdisciplinary, skills that promote collaboration are at a premium; but few of us have the time or opportunity to develop the skills necessary for successful teamwork, such as:

  • Delegation
  • Collaboration
  • Speaking clearly/succinctly
  • Engaging in conflict constructively
  • Listening
  • Prioritizing work
  • Creating focus
  • Building relationships

Take a break from your busy schedule to reflect on your own challenges with respect to working on a team. Give yourself the time to improve your non-technical skills and gain actionable information for making real change. Join Tufts CTSI for Managing Yourself Before Managing Others, a half-day workshop that will provide you with a self-assessment tool and peer feedback on an adaptive skill you hope to acquire or further develop.

Led by Cheryl D. Vaughan, PhD, EdM, Managing Director of Boston Biomedical Innovation Center (B-BIC) Skills Development Center, this workshop is customized to support the development of team science skills at Tufts CTSI and its partners. It was offered previously at the Science of Team Science (SciTS) Conference.

By the end of this workshop, you will be able to:

  • Compare biological immunity to behavioral immunity
  • Describe the Immunity to Change (ITC) method and how it works
  • Identify factors that hinder progress toward a self-improvement goal
  • Consider the challenges faced by teams trying to make meaningful change

Open to all faculty (academic or physician scientists) and their senior staff.
Limited to 20 participants. Participants must be able to attend the entire session.

Details

Wednesday, September 20, 9AM-1PM
Tufts University School of Dental Medicine, 1 Kneeland Street
14th Floor, CE Classroom (1415)

Lunch will be served.

Registration

Please register here by September 13.

 

Conferences & Symposia
One Health Research Symposium Plus

Interested in optimizing the health of humans, animals, and the environment through an innovative and integrative, interdisciplinary approach to education, research, and practice?

Want to meet collaborators and develop grant proposals?

Join Tufts CTSI for One Health Symposium Plus on Monday, October 7 at Tufts University’s Health Sciences Campus in Boston. This interactive event will focus on new research project ideas with the goals of assisting teams to develop research project proposals for future grant submissions and engaging all event participants in team science approaches to further catalyze research ideas.

By the end of this interactive symposium, event participants will be able to:

  • Recognize how research teams develop research projects, from concept toward a written funding proposal.
  • Identify Tufts CTSI team-based translational science resources that can help advance a research project.
  • Articulate the value of gathering peer and expert feedback during the development of a fundable proposal.

Details

Monday, October 7, 2019, 9:00AM-1:00PM
Tufts University School of Dental Medicine, Room 1415 (14th floor)
1 Kneeland Street, Boston MA

Registration

To attend, please register here by October 2, 2019.

Agenda

  • 9:00AM: Registration
  • 9:30AM: Introduction
  • 10:00AM: The Urban Lead Burden in Humans, Animals, and Plants
    • Research team:
      • Ronnie Levin, MA, Visiting Scientist, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
      • Marieke Rosenbaum, DVM, MPH, MS, Research Assistant Professor, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University
      • Carolina L. Zilli Viera, PhD, Research Fellow, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
  • 10:30AM: CAAN: Canines for Autism Activity and Nutrition
    • Research team:
      • Deborah Linder, DVM, DACVN, MS, Research Assistant Professor, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University
      • Christina Mule, PhD, Pediatric Psychologist, Tufts Medical Center; Assistant Professor, Tufts University School of Medicine
      • Aviva Must, PhD, Chair of Public Health and Community Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine
      • Sara Folta, PhD, Associate Professor, The Friedman School of Nutrition and Science Policy, Tufts University
      • Sean Cash, PhD, Associate Professor, The Friedman School of Nutrition and Science Policy, Tufts University
  • 11:00AM: Introduction to Breakout Sessions
  • 11:15AM: Lunch
  • 11:30AM: Working Lunch: Breakout Groups
    • Levin, Dental 1415
    • Linder, Dental 1414
  • 12:45PM: Debrief Breakout Sessions, Next Steps, Evaluations, & Adjourn
Conferences & Symposia
Team Science Summit: Innovations in Alzheimer’s and Neurodegenerative Disease Research

 

Are you a clinician or a researcher working to understand, treat, or prevent Alzheimer’s disease or cognitive disorders associated with aging?

Tufts CTSI, together with The Jackson Laboratory (JAX), is hosting a Team Science Summit: Innovations in Alzheimer’s and Healthy Aging Research on Wednesday, September 18, 8:00AM-3:30PM, at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging (711 Washington Street, Boston).

This event will bring together researchers and clinicians from across Tufts University and Tufts CTSI partners to explore opportunities for multidisciplinary collaborations focused on neurodegenerative disease (Alzheimer’s, other dementias) and healthy aging research. Presentations will focus on ongoing work to interrogate mechanisms of disease evolution, build novel disease models and translational tools, and enable biomarker- driven precision medicine approaches for care and disease prevention.

We encourage clinicians and researchers with an interest in forming new collaborative research projects, including postdocs, to register and attend this full-day event consisting of panel discussions, poster presentations, and networking opportunities.

Details

Wednesday, September 18
8:00AM-3:30PM
Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging
711 Washington Street, Boston

Registration

Please register here.

Agenda

  • 8:00AM: Registration and Breakfast
  • 8:30AM: Welcome and Opening Remarks
    • Welcome, Alice Rushforth, PhD, Tufts CTSI
    • The Jackson Laboratory Overview, Susie Airhart, JAX
    • Charge for the Day, Cheryl London, DVM, PhD, DACVIM, Tufts CTSI
  • 9:00AM: Novel Mechanistic Insights into Neurodegenerative Processes
    • Disorders of the Nervous System and Neurodegeneration, Philip Haydon, PhD, Tufts University School of Medicine
    • Precision Mouse Models of Human Disease: Mechanisms Linking Translation and Axon Degeneration, Robert Burgess, PhD, JAX
    • Neurovascular Mechanisms of Neurodegeneration,Tina Chabrashvili, MD, PhD, Tufts Medical Center
    • Brain Injury, Metabolism, and Alzheimer’s Disease, Chris Dulla, PhD, Tufts University School of Medicine
    • Moderated discussion
  • 10:30AM: Break
  • 10:45AM: Models and Experimental Strategies: Toward Precision Understanding
    • Multi-Omic Analysis Identifies Transcriptional Networks and Drivers Associated with Cognitive Aging and Alzheimer’s Disease, Catherine Kaczorowski, PhD, JAX
    • Modeling Alzheimer’s Disease with Human iPSC-Derived Brain Tissues, Giuseppina Tesco, MD, PhD, Tufts University
    • Translational Data Science for Alzheimer’s Disease Research, Gregory Carter, PhD, JAX
    • Targeting Alzheimer’s Susceptibility Factors with Peptide Aptamers, Benjamin Harrison, PhD, University of New England
    • Moderated Discussion
  • 12:15PM: Lunch, Poster Session, & Networking
  • 1:15PM: Nutrition, Healthy Aging, and Alzheimer’s Disease
    • More Than Memory Loss: Using Advanced Mouse Models to Investigate Non-Cognitive Symptoms of Alzheimer’s Disease, Kristen O’Connell, PhD, JAX
    • Individual Nutrients and the Risk of Alzheimer’s Disease, Paul Jacques, DSc, Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging
    • The Jackson Laboratory Nathan Shock Center Resources for the Aging Research Community, Ron Korstanje, PhD, JAX
    • The Role of Polyphenols in Healthy Aging, Barbara Shukitt-Hale, PhD, Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging
    • Context & Community in Alzheimer’s Disease Research, Tom Meuser, PhD, Center for Excellence in Aging & Health (CEAH) at University of New England
    • Alzheimer’s Disease Research at a Rural Psychiatric Hospital in Maine: Strategies for Clinical Trials and Translational Research in an Unlikely Setting, Cliff Singer, MD, DFAPA, AGSF, Northern Light Health
    • Moderated Discussion 
  • 3:00PM: Wrap Up
Conferences & Symposia
Team Science Summit: The COVID-19 Impact on Health Care

Are you interested in studying the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on health systems and the communities they serve?

Do you have an idea for a collaborative research project and want to meet like-minded clinicians and/or health policy researchers to help you formulate next steps?

Save the date for Tufts CTSI’s Fall 2021 Team Science Summit, The COVID-19 Pandemic Impact on Health Care.

The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted issues such as:

  • Health disparities
  • Equity of access
  • Telehealth
  • System preparedness and responsiveness
  • Health Care staffing
  • Health Care workforce well-being

This event will bring together researchers and clinicians from Brandeis University and Tufts CTSI partners to explore opportunities for multidisciplinary collaborations focused on examining the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on health care. The format will consist of several short talks (five-to-seven minute) followed by breakout groups to help build future collaborative research projects.

Details

Friday, September 17, 2021
2:00-3:30PM
via Zoom

Registration

Please register here.

Who should attend?

Researchers, clinicians, and students at any level who already doing research on the impact of the pandemic, have ideas for new research on the impact of the pandemic, or who are interested in learning more about the pandemic’s impact are encouraged to attend.

Agenda

2:00PM: Welcome and Opening Remarks

  • Jennifer Perloff, PhD, MPA, Brandeis University
  • Cheryl London, DVM, PhD, DACVIM, Tufts University

2:10PM: Topical Project Presentations

  • Modeling Impacts
    • Approximate Bayesian Computation for an Explicit-Duration Hidden Markov Model of COVID-19 Hospital Trajectories
      Michael Hughes, PhD, MS, Tufts University School of Engineering
    • COVID-19 ICU Outcomes by Race
      Sadeq Quraishi, MD, MHA, MMSc, Tufts Medical Center Critical Care Medicine
  • Care Innovations
    • AI-Supported Multilingual Audio for Patients of Limited English Proficiency
      Hyeon Ju Song, MS, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
    • Telehealth within Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer Programs
      Nadine Linendoll, PhD, MDiv, GNP, Tufts Medical Center Cancer Center
  • Workforce Issues and Impacts
    • PTSD related to COVID-19 and the Impacts of the Workplace
      Samantha Meeker, MPH, PhD Candidate, Northeastern University
    • Palliative Care in Nursing Homes: COVID-19 Public Health Emergency and Realistic Implications for Future Care
      Christine Bishop, PhD, Heller School for Social Policy and Management, Brandeis University
  • Vaccine Uptake
    • Community Dialogues to Build Trustworthiness and COVID Vaccine Confidence
      Jonathan Garlick, DDS, PhD, Tufts School of Dental Medicine
    • A Qualitative Study of Decisions About COVID-19 Immunizations Among Rural Mainers
      Kathleen Fairfield, MD, MPH, DrPH, Maine Medical Center

2:50PM: Parallel Sessions (Topic Discussion/Idea Generation)

  • Breakout 1: Modeling Impacts
    • Facilitator: Jennifer Perloff, PhD, MPA, Brandeis University
  • Breakout 2: Care Innovations
    • Facilitator: Daniel Weiner, MD, MS, Tufts Medical Center
  • Breakout 3: Workforce Issues
    • Facilitator: Karen Donelan, ScD, EdM, Brandeis University
  • Breakout 4: Vaccine Uptake
    • Facilitator: Cheryl London, DVM, PhD, DACVIM, Tufts University

3:30PM: Adjourn

Abstracts

Approximate Bayesian Computation for an Explicit-Duration Hidden Markov Model of COVID-19 Hospital Trajectories

Michael Hughes, PhD, MS, Tufts University School of Engineering

I’m looking to brainstorm if there are any groups that have ideas about how the model could help their research, or how we can extend the model to better capture important real phenomena. We address the problem of modeling constrained hospital resources in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic in order to inform decision-makers of future demand and assess the societal value of possible interventions. For broad applicability, we focus on the common yet challenging scenario where patient-level data for a region of interest are not available. Instead, given daily admissions counts, we model aggregated counts of observed resource use, such as the number of patients in the general ward, in the intensive care unit, or on a ventilator. In order to explain how individual patient trajectories produce these counts, we propose an aggregate count explicit-duration hidden Markov model, nicknamed the ACED-HMM, with an interpretable, compact parameterization. We develop an Approximate Bayesian Computation approach1 that draws samples from the posterior distribution over the model’s transition and duration parameters given aggregate counts from a specific location, thus adapting the model to a region or individual hospital site of interest. Samples from this posterior can then be used to produce future forecasts of any counts of interest.

 

The Association of Race with Clinical Outcomes in Patients with Coronavirus Disease 2019 Admitted to the Intensive Care Unit

Sharma E. Joseph, MD and Sadeq A. Quraishi, MD, MHA, MMSc

Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, Tufts Medical Center

The team investigated whether race is associated with length of stay (LOS), discharge destination, and in-hospital mortality in COVID-19 patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) of a single, teaching hospital that serves a racially diverse patient population. We performed a retrospective analysis of data from COVID-19 patients admitted to the ICUs at Tufts Medical Center between March 2020 and August 2020. Self-reported race was categorized as White, Black, Latinx, or Asian. Via a 500-patient analytic cohort (200 White, 100 Black, 100 Latinx, and 100 Asian), we investigated the association of race with ICU length of stay and with discharge destination (non-home vs home) and mortality. Our analysis demonstrated that there was no difference between White, Black, and Asian patients regarding ICU LOS. However, compared to White patients, Latinx patients were more likely to have a prolonged ICU LOS. We found there was no relationship between race and discharge destination, and that there was no difference in mortality between White, Black, and Latinx patients. However, Asian patients had almost 60% lower likelihood of mortality compared to White patients. Our results suggest that race may have an influence on important clinical outcomes in COVID-19 patients admitted to the ICU. Further studies are needed to determine whether biological reasons can explain these observed differences and to determine whether these risk factors could be modified to improve outcomes in critically ill COVID-19 patients.

 

AI-Supported Multilingual Audio for Patients of Limited English Proficiency

Hyeon Ju Song, MS, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

We aim to provide AI-supported multilingual audio to patients of limited English proficiency so that they can receive quality medical care. We are in the stages of testing out our research by collaborating with various care teams across the Mass General Hospital. This project aims to reduce health disparity and promote equity both during the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond.

 

Telehealth within Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer Programs

Nadine Linendoll, PhD, MDiv, GNP, Tufts Medical Center Cancer Center

The Reid R Sacco Adolescent and Young Adult Survivorship Program closed to in-person visits in early 2020 due to the Covid-19 pandemic. During the pandemic heath care providers began to worry that vulnerable cancer patients would begin to fall out of care and experience negative health outcomes.  Responding to the need to keep patients in care, the clinic began a rapid roll out of new telehealth platforms to facilitate provider-to-patient interaction in real time. The transition to telehealth occurred quickly through strategic decision-making and policy changes at both the federal and state level. Clinic staff initially identified the most vulnerable patients with known mental health concerns. Telehealth was rolled out to patients in two phases including audio only and then audio-video platforms. Telehealth services successfully kept vulnerable patients in care during the pandemic with increased flexibility to check in with patients more frequently. The clinic’s long-term goal is to integrate telehealth into standard AYA survivorship care; however, telehealth faces increasing barriers in health policy, as many of the modifications made early in the pandemic are being amended or lifted. Oncology providers are advocating for health policy legislation to extend telehealth services beyond the pandemic into routine oncologic care.

 

PTSD related to COVID-19 and the Impacts of the Workplace 

Samantha Meeker, MPH, PhD Candidate, Northeastern University

The COVID-19 pandemic’s immediate consequences have been grave; however, the severity of the long-term effects is yet unknown. Among these unknown impacts is the rate of PTSD related to COVID-19 among the general population. Rates of PTSD related to the pandemic have been shown to be high in early studies, but research around mental health and the workplace has found that workplaces can mitigate the mental health issues, like PTSD, related to a health emergency such as COVID-19. Our research aimed to examine how PTSD related to COVID-19 was impacted by workplaces. Specifically, we studied the impacts of job supports, including types of paid leave and organizational practices on PTSD. We used data from a national panel survey of working parents that measured PTSD using a modified version of the Impact of Events Scale – 6. We found that both demographics and workplace supports played a role in levels of PTSD among working parents. Our findings suggest that workplace level interventions can be effective during times of health emergencies to reduce mental health issues among staff.

 

Palliative Care in Nursing Homes: COVID-19 Public Health Emergency and Realistic Implications for Future Care

Christine E. Bishop. PhD, Heller School for Social Policy and Management, Brandeis University

Kacy Ninteau, BS, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Psychosocial Oncology and Palliative Care

Palliative care addresses physical, emotional, psychological, and spiritual suffering that accompanies serious illness. Symptom management and continuous assessment of goals of care are especially valuable for seriously ill nursing home residents, but are often far from ideal in practice. Previous research has emphasized use of outside consultants, who have often been difficult for nursing home residents to access, or dedicated internal resources, hard for resource-strapped nursing homes to provide. Our preliminary investigation of palliative care challenges stemming from the isolation imposed by the COVID-19 public health emergency (PHE) highlighted the potential for in-house delivery of palliative care. It left us with questions about the roles in facilitating or impeding effective palliative care for residents’ physicians, Medicare hospice policy and providers, and the knowledge base and task priorities of overextended nursing staff.  We are seeking partners with knowledge of nursing home palliative care to contribute to a study design using qualitative, administrative, and survey data.

 

Community Dialogues to Build Trustworthiness and COVID Vaccine Confidence

 Jonathan Garlick, DDS, PhD, Tufts School of Dental Medicine; Jennifer Allen, ScD, MPH, MSN, Melissa Barbosa, Raissa Li, Anton Schenk, Tufts University School of Arts and Sciences; Binta Barry, Maggie Fenwood Hughes, MSW, MS, Nicole Tong, Tufts CTSI

The pandemic has dramatically revealed the need for public health communication strategies that value people’s legitimate uncertainties and fears about COVID vaccination.  We are creating dialogues in Boston communities of color and immigrant communities where participants share life experiences that underly what they think and feel about COVID vaccination.  These conversations create a space to build mutual understanding as people humanize one another when considering the risks and benefits of vaccination. This talk will describe the process of building dialogues that are “from the community, for the community”, as well as highlight the tensions and challenges in doing this work.

 

A Qualitative Study of Decisions About COVID-19 Immunizations Among Rural Mainers

Kathleen Fairfield, MD, MPH, DrPH, Maine Medical Center

While New England states have been relatively successful in COVID-19 uptake of vaccines, rates remain below thresholds set by the CDC. In Maine, rates of vaccination were still only 64% of the 12+population in August 2021. Experts have emphasized an evidence-based approach—listening to the concerns of communities—to create effective policies or messages to encourage more people to be immunized. However, there is little available evidence for rural populations, especially in New England. We sought to better understand reasons for vaccine hesitancy among rural Mainers to fill this need. In collaboration with community partners, we recruited individuals to participate in semi-structured interviews about their attitudes toward, knowledge about and experience with COVID-19 vaccination, including how they receive and evaluate information related to the vaccines. Our findings are clear that there is variability in attitudes towards COVID-19vaccines among rural populations in northern New England, and these differences warrant separate strategies for accelerating vaccine uptake. Explicit messages to vaccinate are likely to backfire among individuals whose hesitancy stems from skepticism of COVID-19. Mandates may further entrench their concerns and could inspire sympathy among many of the vaccinated as well. We plan to use insights from this study to develop a targeted messaging intervention.

 

Contact

Hannah Santos, MBA
Senior Project Manager, Tufts Clinical and Translational Science Institute
Hsantos@tuftsmedicalcenter.org

Conferences & Symposia
Translational Research Day 2020

Building Research Teams for Impact on Health: Spanning Disciplines and Stakeholders

Interested in learning how to build authentic partnerships for translational research collaboration? Mark your calendar for Translational Research Day 2020 on Friday, March 6 at the Tufts Health Sciences Campus in Boston.

Friday, March 6
8:30AM-3:30PM
Tufts Medical Center
Wolff Auditorium
800 Washington Street, Boston, MA 02111

Download and share the Translational Research Day 2020 flyer (PDF).

Watch the livestream on March 6 starting at 9:00AM EST!

Access the Translational Research Day slides here (PDF).

Registration

Please register to attend.

Keynote

The Grand Rounds keynote address will be given by Sharon Terry, MA, President and CEO of Genetic Alliance in Washington, DC. Ms. Terry is internationally known for her work on engaging individuals, families and communities to transform health and further biomedical research. She played a central role in identifying the gene for a rare disease affecting her two children.

Agenda

  • 8:30AM: Registration, breakfast, and digital poster session
  • 9:00AM:
  • 9:15AM: Taming the Wild Beast: Fueling the Power of Collaborative Innovation (Gigi Hirsh, MD, MIT Center for Biomedical Innovation)
    • NewDigs is a collaborative biomedical innovation platform that for the past 10 years has developed new methods for delivering value faster to key stakeholders. Dr. Hirsch will share her extensive experience gained in identifying and working with the value chain of decisionmakers, including the critical role of effective communication processes in sustaining collaboration. She will also discuss new tools that have emerged from these processes that drive value to stakeholders.
    • Moderator: Harry Selker, MD, MSPH, Tufts CTSI)
  • 9:45AM: Scientific Talks: Handbook of Broadly-Engaged Team Science
    • Anticipating the Growing Use of Real-World Data in Clinical Research (Kenneth Getz, MBA, Tufts Center for the Study of Drug Development)
      • Dr. Getz will discuss the shift towards the use of real-world data in the drug development and drug approval process. The use of real-world data in drug innovation and approval reflects the growing importance of obtaining insights directly from patients and their caregivers and others involved in patient care. Access to and use of real-world data requires a new level of collaboration and teamwork among multiple stakeholders, which is now occurring.
    • The Changing Role of Patient Advocates in Oncology Research (Susan Parsons, MD, MRP, Tufts Medical Center)
      • Dr. Parsons will draw on her extensive experience as a Principal Investigator on numerous studies of patient-centered cancer care and her key role in clinical trial development for the National Cancer Institute as a member of the NCI’s Scientific Steering Committee for Cancer Care Delivery an NCI-funded inter-group study of newly diagnosed patients with Hodgkin Lymphoma. Dr. Parsons will discuss the emerging role and importance of advocates in planning and conducting clinical trials as well as the challenges and benefits of integrated research teams.
    • Moderator: Jonathan Davis, MD, Tufts CTSI
  • 10:25AM: Break
  • 10:40AM: Panel: Authentic Engagement of Non-researchers in Team Science (Robert Sege, MD; Linda Hudson, PhD; Sara Folta, PhD, Tufts CTSI)
    • We will hear from three experts in community engagement in research. Dr. Hudson will discuss the value of partnering with communities, and the critical role of relationship-building, including how to engage and retain the interest of community stakeholders. Dr. Folta will draw upon an innovative theory to discuss principles of creating equity in research partnerships between scientists and community members. She will identify the six different types of capital non-scientist stakeholders bring to research and examples of how to achieve equity in these relationships. Dr. Sege will discuss his innovative work with community-based pediatric providers to achieve change in community-based clinical practices.
    • Moderator: Jonathan Garlick, DDS, PhD, Tufts CTSI
  • 11:25AM: Digital poster session, lunch, networking
  • 12:00PM: Keynote Address and Medical Grand Rounds
    • If You Are Not At the Table, You Are On the Menu: Building Research Teams for Impact on Health (Sharon Terry, MA, Genetic Alliance)
    • Moderator: Harry Selker, MD, MSPH, Tufts CTSI
  • 1:00PM: Travel to Dental Building, 14th Floor, for afternoon sessions
  • 1:15PM: 
    • Session A: Engaging Diverse Stakeholders in Basic Science Research (Jonathan Garlick, DDS, PhD, Tufts CTSI; Cheryl London, DVM, PhD, Tufts CTSI; Jens Rueter, MD, The Jackson Laboratory. Moderator: John Castellot, PhD, Tufts CTSI)
      • This groundbreaking session will involve presentations from three major basic scientists who have done pioneering work in diversification of research teams, demonstrating partnerships to advance research and leading to innovative approaches to research design and implementation. Dr. Garlick will discuss his transformation as a scientist researching scleroderma based on inclusion of patients in conceptualizing and implementing studies. He has since developed the Civic Communication curriculum, which engages scientists and all stakeholders in acquiring skills in authentic collaboration. Dr. London, a leader in the One Health initiative, will discuss the necessity and complexity of cross-species research and her new approaches that blend multi-team, multi-institutional resources to include mouse, dog and human models. Dr. Rueter from The Jackson Laboratory is leading a project at the other end of the translational spectrum — he is conducting implementation research community based health care providers. This is research on the use of genomic testing to improve the care of cancer patients in rural Maine. Dr. Rueter’s project is at a critical flexion point in scientific research—the translation from laboratory to widespread use. This project is using a collaborative model in which the lab is partnering with cancer care providers in local clinics to improve access to and use genomic testing by patients and their physicians in cancer care. The use of genomic testing in precision medicine is relatively new and integration into community use is challenging.
    • Session B: Innovative Broadly-Engaged Team Science Tools, Methods, and Frameworks (Peter Levine, PhD, Tufts University; Sarah Goff, MD, PhD, Baystate Medical Center; Kathleen Szegda, PhD, MPH, MS, Public Health Institute of Western Massachusetts; Denise H. Daudelin, RN, MPH, Tufts CTSI; Moderator: Robert Sege, MD, PhD, Tufts CTSI)
      • This session is a unique opportunity to hear from experts in community-based research and stakeholder engagement. Drs. Goff and Szegny have developed a training program for community leaders designed to model authentic partnerships in research. Additionally, they developed a training course, community-engaged research 101, focused on researchers and building relationships with communities. Drs. Goff and Szegny will talk about their training, giving examples of key concepts and approaches. Attendees will participate in a short exercise to demonstrate these ideas. Ms. Daudelin will discuss the Math Equipoise project, which was a large-scale project in which diverse stakeholders were involved in designing research to address the outcomes of osteoarthritis. This presentation will focus on the approaches used to create a patient and scientist integrated research team. Peter Levine has extensive experience developing partnerships for health improvement with members of social movements. Social movements such as ACT-UP have changed the course of scientific research; however, many researchers do not have knowledge of social movements or how to effectively engage with them. He will present a framework to assist researchers to engage effectively with social movements relevant to their research interests.
  • 3:00PM: Networking and refreshments (Alice Rushforth, PhD; Debra Lerner, MS, PhD, Tufts CTSI)

Poster Session

Present your translational research at our poster session!

Posters will be displayed electronically (on HD screens from ePosterBoards) from 8:30AM-noon. Previously presented posters are welcome. Learn more and submit your abstract by Friday, February 21. 

Get Social

Look for #TranslationalTufts2020 on social media and join the conversation.

 

Conferences & Symposia
Translational Research Day 2021

Download a handout of our presenter biographies and abstracts (PDF).

Translational Research Across the Spectrum

Interested in learning about how research that spans translational phases leads to discoveries like the COVID-19 vaccines? Mark your calendar for Translational Research Day 2021:

Tuesday, April 27
9:00AM-3:00PM
Online via Zoom

Registration

Please register here to attend.

Keynote

The keynote address will be given by John R. Mascola, MD, Director of the Dale and Betty Bumpers Vaccine Research Center (VRC) at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), National Institutes of Health (NIH). Dr. Mascola will highlight the scientific discoveries that laid the foundation for rapid COVID-19 vaccine development.

Agenda

  • 9:00-9:15AM: Welcoming remarks
    • Harry Selker, MD, MSPH
      Dean and Principal Investigator, Tufts CTSI; Executive Director, Institute for Clinical Research and Health Policy Studies, Tufts Medical Center
  • 9:15-10:00AM: Keynote address:
    • John R. Mascola, MD
      Director of the Dale and Betty Bumpers Vaccine Research Center (VRC) at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), National Institutes of Health (NIH)
      Rapid Response to a Novel Pathogen: COVID-19 Vaccine Development
  • 10:00-10:05AM: Break
  • 10;05AM-noon: Plenary: Scientific talks
  • noon-12:30PM: Lunch break
  • 12:30PM-2:00PM: Concurrent breakout sessions
    • Jonathan Garlick, DDS, PhD
      Director of Science Communications, Tufts CTSI; Director, Tufts Initiative In Civic Science; Professor, School of Dental Medicine, School of Medicine, School of Engineering, Tufts University
      Building Trustworthiness and Vaccine Confidence through Dialogue in COVID-19-vulnerable Communities
    • Kinna Thakarar, DO, MPH
      Assistant Professor of Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine; Attending Physician, Maine Medical Center
      Improving Discharge Decision-making among Vulnerable Hospitalized Patients
  • 2:00-2:05PM: Break
  • 2:05-2:45PM: Plenary: Report-out and next steps
  • 2:45-3:00PM: Closing Remarks
    • Harry Selker, MD, MSPH

Get Social

Look for #TranslationalTufts2021 on social media and join the conversation.

 

Conferences & Symposia
Tufts CTSI-Northeastern Joint Summit: Exercise, Aging, and Cognitive Function

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Northeastern logo

 

Want to learn about research from experts in the field and meet potential research collaborators?

The Tufts CTSI-Northeastern Joint Summit Exercise, Aging, and Cognitive Function, is an invitation-only, half-day event that brings together seasoned researchers for a collaborative event showcasing expert research, brainstorming, and networking sessions to build potential collaborations. Featuring an overview by Arthur Kramer, PhD (Northeastern University, Senior Vice Provost for Research & Graduate Education), this event promises to foster connections across institutions.

Details

Wednesday, September 13
9:00AM-2:00PM
Tufts Health Sciences Campus, Boston
(Room location to be announced soon)

Registration

This event is by invitation only.