Conferences & Symposia
5th Annual Asian Health Symposium

Moving Forward, Looking Back: Using Research to Improve Community Health

Interested in hearing the results of research conducted in Boston’s Chinatown/Asian communities? Wondering what’s next for the Addressing Disparities in Asian Populations through Translational Research (ADAPT) Program?

Join Tufts CTSI and ADAPT for the 5th Annual Asian Health Symposium, Moving Forward, Looking Back: Using Research to Improve Community Health. This half-day event will inform participants about research taking place in and around Chinatown. See how academic/community collaborations fueled research and the findings that resulted from that work. Attendees will hear presentations on recent and ongoing studies focused on overlooked health issues or understudied areas, discuss potential next steps, and brainstorm how to further increase community engagement in research.

Researchers and community members are encouraged to attend this exciting event.

After attending this event, participants should be able to:

  • Identify several exciting research projects completed in Boston Chinatown/Asian Communities in the past five years.
  • Describe the key findings/takeaways from these research projects.
  • Recognize the value of increased community engagement and collaboration with research in your community.

Details

Tuesday, April 23, 2019, 9:30AM-1:30PM
Tufts University School of Dental Medicine, Rachel’s Auditorium, Room 1414 (14th Floor)
1 Kneeland Street, Boston MA

Registration

Researchers and community members are encouraged to attend.

Space is limited! Please register here by April 15.

 

 

This event is provided free of charge, and was supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of health, Award Number UL1TR002544. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

Seminars & Workshops
Advancing Confidence and Connection in Public Speaking

Need help finding your voice and engaging your audience? Want to improve your communication skills to convey complex information to others?

Join Tufts CTSI for an exciting two-part workshop, Advancing Confidence and Connection in Public Speaking. In two 90-minute interactive sessions, Bridget Kathleen O’Leary, MFA, Visiting Artist in Directing at Tufts University School of Arts and Sciences, will lead guide attendees through the process of finding confidence in their own voices.

Part One of the workshop will teach you how to pitch your research to audiences large and small through increased confidence and audience engagement techniques.

Part Two will help you to deliver dry information in a clear and engaging way, creating a narrative flow and conversation with an audience.

After attending Parts One and Two of this workshop, participants should be able to:

  • Recognize how voice and speech impact efficient communication
  • Practice elements of relaxation, resonance, and expressiveness during public speaking
  • Recall techniques to command the attention of, and engagement, with their audience
  • Identify techniques to communicate ideas and objectives with clarity and authenticity

Participants are expected to attend both 90-minute sessions and should bring to Part Two a 2-3 minute sample piece (lecture, presentation, pitch, or persuasive argument).

Details

Part One: Tuesday, March 12, 3:30-5:00PM, 8th Floor Large Conference Room, 35 Kneeland Street, Boston MA

Part Two: Friday, March 15, 2:30-4:00PM, 8th Floor Large Conference Room, 35 Kneeland Street, Boston MA

Registration

Please register here.

Tufts CTSI Professional Education & Expectation for Course Participants

Tufts CTSI’s Professional Education programs provide non-degree continuing education and training for clinical and translational research professionals from all Tufts CTSI partners and beyond.

Course enrollment priority is given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions. If your participation needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may provide their contact information when you register for the program.

This course is provided free of charge, and was supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of health, Award Number UL1TR002544. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

Seminars & Workshops
Civic Life and Health Research

Civic Life and Health Research seminar slides (PDF)

What is civic life, and why is it important to consider in clinical research? Understand the relevance of civic engagement to clinical and other health research at Civic Life and Health Research, a seminar by Peter Levine, PhD, Associate Dean and Lincoln Filene Professor of Citizenship and Public Affairs at Tufts University’s Jonathan M. Tisch College of Civic Life. Get oriented to current research and debates about civic engagement in the US; challenge the frequent definition of civic engagement as professionals consulting stakeholders; and instead begin to see medical researchers and health professionals as citizens who should relate to other people as fellow citizens.

By the end of this seminar, participants will be able to:

  • Define the concept of civic life and related terms such as civic engagement, social capital, democratic participation, and community engagement from social science perspectives.
  • Value civic engagement as relevant to the clinical research process.
  • Explore differences in theory and practice depending on whether one thinks in terms of clients, patients, stakeholders, communities, publics, or citizens.
  • Illustrate exemplary actions that investigators can take that involve civic life.

Details

Wednesday, January 25, 9:30-11:00AM
Arthur M. Sackler Center for Medical Education, Room 216A
145 Harrison Avenue, Boston MA

Or via live, interactive webcast (a link will be provided to those who register).

Registration

All are welcome to attend. Please register here.

 

Seminars & Workshops
Community Engagement to Improve Asian Health

After completing this lecture, you will be able to:

  • Describe the goals of ADAPT
  • Discuss the current status of Asian health data in Boston
  • Identify how to build a working partnership between academics and community partners
  • Discuss the importance of Asian health research
  • Explain the stakeholder engagement methods used by ADAPT.

Taught by: Carolyn Rubin EdD, MA and Mei-Hua Fu, MS, MEd.

Seminars & Workshops
Engaging Stakeholders in Community-Based Participatory Research Partnerships

Seminar slides (PDF)

Interested in identifying potential stakeholders in local communities? what are some effective models of academic-community partnerships in translational research?

Join us for for Engaging Stakeholders in Community-Based Participatory Research, a seminar led by Carolyn Rubin, EdD, MA, Tufts CTSI’s Director of Addressing Disparities in Asian Populations through Translational Research (ADAPT) and Assistant Professor at Tufts University School of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Community Medicine.

Dr. Rubin will discuss how researchers and communities can collaborate to identify and address community priorities in translational science.

In this interactive, 90-minute seminar, you will learn what community-based participatory research (CBPR) is, and why you might pursue it.

By the end of this seminar, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the definition and benefits of CBPR
  • Identify strategies for building authentic, long-term partnerships
  • Reflect on your (or your institution’s) relationships with local communities and potential next steps toward CBPR.

Details

Tuesday, February 7, 9:30-11:00AM
Arthur M. Sackler Center for Medical Education, Room 114 East
145 Harrison Avenue, Boston MA

Or via live, interactive webcast (a link will be provided to those who register).

Registration

All are welcome to attend. Please register here by Tuesday, January 31.

 

Seminars & Workshops
Issues of Trust in Research Participation

Seminar Info

Are you a researcher experiencing difficulties with recruiting research participants? Are you a physician, nurse, or staff member who refers patients to clinical trials?

Trust is a major barrier to patients considering enrollment in research trials. Explore the causes and results of mistrust and learn why “trust me” is not enough at Issues of Trust in Research Participation, a Tufts Medical Center Grand Rounds event. This hour-long seminar will be led by Robert Sege, MD, PhD, Co-Director of Tufts CTSI’s Stakeholder and Community Engagement Program, Chief Medical Officer & Director of The Medical Foundation at Health Resources in Action (HRiA), and Adjunct Professor of Medicine and Pediatrics at Tufts University School of Medicine. Dr. Sege will present a history of unethical studies conducted with vulnerable populations, and will discuss more recent controversies surrounding placebo-controlled trials at the beginning of the AIDS epidemic. Following his presentation, there will be a panel discussion on patient advocacy and community perspectives.

After attending this session, you should be able to:

  • Describe current and historical reasons for mistrust of medical research.
  • Recognize the need to examine issues of trust in the design and communication of clinical studies.
  • Understand patients who hesitate to enroll in clinical studies and trials.
  • Utilize Tufts CTSI expertise to better communicate with participants and research teams.

Details

Friday, February 2, noon-1:00PM
Wolff Auditorium, Tufts Medical Center
800 Washington Street, Boston

You are welcome to bring your own lunch.

 

Seminars & Workshops
Methods of Stakeholder Engagement

After completing this lecture, you will be able to:

  • Review the Tufts CTSI framework for stakeholder and community engagement
  • State different methods for engaging stakeholders and community members in research
  • Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of different methods of stakeholder engagement.

Taught by: Carolyn Rubin, EdD, MA and Laurel K. Leslie, MD, MPH.

Seminars & Workshops
Museum of Science-Tufts CTSI Forum Collaboration: Topic Selection Workshop

Would you like to help to determine the topics and questions to be discussed at upcoming Museum of Science/Tufts CTSI public forums on health research?

Tufts CTSI and Museum of Science, Boston are planning four public forums on important topics in health research. At each forum, we will invite the public to engage in interactive and facilitated discussions as they work together to make decisions or solve a problem.

We need your help to choose a topic for deliberation at the first forum, to be held at the Museum of Science in fall 2019.

We are looking for people with different values, opinions, and ideas to come together at an all-day Topic Selection Workshop on Friday, March 1 to select a forum topic that will help inform local researchers about the needs, concerns, and ideas of the community.

Workshop participants will hear lightning talks from community members and experts in the fields of addiction, precision medicine, and exercise/nutrition research and form small groups to discuss, narrow down, and select questions that will be important and interesting for the public to deliberate. By involving community partners and other stakeholders in the beginning of the process, we hope to leave this workshop with the topic of the fall 2019 forum and a plan to move forward to further engage the local community in science and research.

Details

Friday, March 1, 8:30AM-5:00PM (breakfast and lunch will be provided)
Arthur M. Sackler Center for Medical Education, Room 114 East
145 Harrison Avenue, Boston MA

Registration

Registration is required. Please register here by February 25.

Tufts CTSI Professional Education & Expectation for Course Participants

Tufts CTSI’s Professional Education programs provide non-degree continuing education and training for clinical and translational research professionals from all Tufts CTSI partners and beyond.

Course enrollment priority is given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions. If your participation needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may provide their contact information when you register for the program.

This course is provided free of charge, and was supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of health, Award Number UL1TR002544. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

Seminars & Workshops
Preparing for Patient-Centered and Stakeholder-Engaged Research

Need to incorporate stakeholder engagement into your study, but not sure where to start? Learn how to make your research patient-centered, and find out how engagement fits into your research process at Preparing for Patient-Centered and Stakeholder-Engaged Research. Thomas Concannon, PhD, Tufts CTSI’s Director of Stakeholder and Community Engagement and Assistant Director of Comparative Effectiveness Research, will share his expertise and explain several models for engaging with stakeholders.

By the end of this seminar, participants will be able to:

  • Define patient-centered comparative effectiveness research (CER)
  • Describe the potential value of using Stakeholder and Community Engagement (SCE) and CER frameworks in your research.
  • Identify how engagement fits into the research process based on the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI), Deverka, and Concannon models
  • Discuss the potential value of establishing a partnership with patients
  • Explain how to make your research patient-centered

Details

Tuesday, October 25, 9:30-11:00AM
Arthur M. Sackler Center for Medical Education, Room 114 East
145 Harrison Avenue, Boston MA

Or via live, interactive webcast (a link will be provided to those who register).

Registration

All are welcome to attend. Please register here.

 

Conferences & Symposia
Stakeholder and Community Engagement Symposium

Interested in the science of stakeholder & community engagement?

Want to meet collaborators and develop grant proposals?

Join Tufts CTSI for a Stakeholder and Community Engagement Symposium on Tuesday, March 7, 9:30AM-3:00PM, at Tufts University School of Dental Medicine, Rachel’s Amphitheater (1 Kneeland Street, 14th Floor, Boston).

Please RSVP here by Friday, March 3.

Agenda

  • 9:30AM: Registration and welcome
  • 10:00AM: Introductions
  • 10:30AM: Project presentations
  • 12:30PM: Lunch
  • 1:15PM: Breakout sessions
  • 2:30PM: Report-back, summary, evaluation, and next steps

Topics

The workshop will focus on the following projects, with the objective of assisting teams to develop proposals for future grant submission:

  • Expanding on the science of community-engaged research: Building bridges and strengthening relationships with communities; Linda B. Hudson, ScD, MSPH; Tufts University School of Medicine
  • Family Goals and Preferences for Treatments for Autism Spectrum Disorder; Tara Lavelle, PhD; Tufts Medical Center
  • Effectiveness of Community-Based Diabetes Care Model (C-DCM) in addressing Health Disparities in Immigrant Populations; Mohan Thanikachalam, MD; Tufts University School of Medicine
  • HCV Testing and Treatment Pathways in Jails; Alysse Wurcel, MD, MS; Tufts Medical Center

Contact

For more information, please contact Thomas W. Concannon, PhD, Tufts CTSI Director of Stakeholder and Community Engagement.

 

Seminars & Workshops
Stakeholder and Community Engagement: Lessons Learned

After completing this lecture, you will be able to:

  • State which community and stakeholder groups were used in the research project examples
  • Explain how utilizing stakeholder and community engagement helped the projects
  • Describe what engagement strategies were employed in the projects
  • Apply our approach for mapping the needs of your research project to an appropriate engagement strategy.

Taught by: Laurel K. Leslie, MD, MPH and Carolyn Rubin EdD, MA.

Seminars & Workshops
Stakeholder and Community Engagement: Why It’s Important

After completing this lecture, you will be able to:

  • Define patient, stakeholder, and community engagement
  • Explain national trends in engagement in requests for proposals from federal and private, non-profit research funder
  • State reasons for using stakeholders (including patients) and community members in your research
  • Discuss an approach for mapping the needs of your research project to an appropriate engagement strategy.

Taught by: Laurel K. Leslie, MD, MPH

Seminars & Workshops
Stakeholder Engagement in Patient-Centered Comparative Effectiveness Research

Seminar slides (PDF)

What is stakeholder and community engagement (SCE), and why is it important? Learn the benefits, strategies, and methods at Stakeholder Engagement in Patient-Centered Comparative Effectiveness Research. This seminar, taught by Thomas Concannon, PhD, Tufts CTSI’s Director of Stakeholder and Community Engagement and Assistant Director of Comparative Effectiveness Research, will review previous patient-centered studies and assess the strengths and weaknesses of their engagement efforts, and their impact on research outcomes.

By the end of this seminar, participants will be able to:

  • Define stakeholder and stakeholder and community engagement (SCE)
  • State different methods for engaging stakeholders and community members in research
  • Outline a framework for SCE utilizing the 7Ps Framework and 6 Stage Model of Comparative Effectiveness Research (CER)
  • Discuss the strengths and weaknesses of SCE in the ACT UP and breast cancer screening guideline examples
  • Identify key lessons learned in the SCE process over time

Details

Wednesday, September 28, 9:30-11:00AM
Arthur M. Sackler Center for Medical Education, Room 114 East
145 Harrison Avenue, Boston MA

Or via live, interactive webcast (a link will be provided to those who register).

Registration

All are welcome to attend. Please register here.