POSTPONED
A Paradigm Shift in Clinical Research and Education: The P-value Controversy and the End of Statistical Significance?

POSTPONED

Given guidance and recent reports related to the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19), this event has been postponed.

We hope to reschedule the symposium for later this year. As soon as new details are available, we will share them here.

We apologize for any inconvenience.

What does the p-value controversy mean for clinical research?

The deep controversy surrounding the use and misuse of p-values and statistical significance is evident in the decision by the American Statistical Association to issue a policy statement on the matter in 2016. The statement marked the first occasion the Association has taken a position on a specific matter of statistical practice since its founding in 1839.

This Tufts CTSI symposium, co-sponsored by the Tufts Data Intensive Studies Center (DISC),  aims to inform clinician researchers and statisticians regarding the principles covered in the statement as well as the controversy over the proper use and interpretation of the p-value. Distinguished panelists will speak on use of p-values from their multiple perspectives to reflect the landscape of opinions and provide guidance for investigators and educators going forward. They include scientists, statisticians, epidemiologists, and statistical advisors to prominent journals and policy organizations, with expertise in statistics, genetics, communication, nutrition, obesity, cardiovascular disease, and drug approval.

Learning objectives:

  • Understand the rationale behind the ASA statement that “No single index [i.e., p-value] should substitute for scientific reasoning.
  • Discuss the role that p-values have had on reproducibility and replication and the proposed remedies.
  • Apply alternative remedies for dealing with uncertainty in clinical research and education.


Panelists

John P.A. Ioannidis, MD, DSC

C.F. Rehnborg Chair in Disease Prevention and Professor at Stanford University
Author of “Why Most Published Research Findings are False,” accessed more than three million times. His recent JAMA viewpoint is subtitled “Do Not Abandon Significance.” Dr. Ioannidis has published nearly 1,000 papers and is one of the 10 most-cited scientists worldwide.

David Allison, PhD

Dean and Provost of the Indiana University School of Public Health
Author of “A Tragedy of Errors: Mistakes in Peer-reviewed Papers are Easy to Find but Hard to Fix, Report” and committee member of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine report, “Reproducibility and Replicability in Science.”

David Harrington, PhD

Professor of Biostatistics, Emeritus, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Co-Author of the 2019 New England Journal of Medicine article, “New Guidelines for Statistical Reporting in the Journal.” Dr. Harrington is also the principal investigator of the Statistical Coordinating Center for the Cancer Care Outcomes Research and Surveillance (CanCORS) Consortium and the project leader of the Biostatistics Core and Director of the Biostatistics Research Program in the Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center (DF/HCC).

Allen Schirm, PhD

Recently retired from Mathematica Policy Research
Co-Author of the 2019 The American Statistician editorial, “Moving to a World Beyond ‘p<0.05’.” He and Dr. Ron Wasserstein recently discussed their recommendations on statistical inference at the United States Conference on Teaching Statistics.

 

Details

Tuesday, April 7
8:30-11:30AM
Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging (HNRCA)
711 Washington Street, Boston, MA 02111

All are welcome to attend, especially:

  • Clinician researchers and investigators leading clinical trials.
  • Statisticians working with and educating clinical investigators.

Registration

Space is limited. Please register to attend.

 

About Tufts CTSI Events

Tufts CTSI’s Professional Education programs provide non-degree continuing education and training for clinical and translational research professionals from all Tufts CTSI partners and beyond.

Course enrollment priority is given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions. If your participation needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may provide their contact information when you register for the program.

This course is provided free of charge, and was supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of health, Award Number UL1TR002544.  The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

 

Seminars & Workshops
Center for Quantitative Methods and Data Science Seminar: Karl Broman, PhD

Interested in learning how to make your data analysis and other scientific computations reproducible?

The Center for Quantitative Methods and Data Science, in partnership with the Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Research Design (BERD) Center and the Data-Intensive Studies Center (DISC) will host a virtual seminar series on a Wednesday each month from 2:00-3:00PM.

The session on Wednesday, December 16 will feature Karl Broman, PhD. He will give a talk titled Steps Toward Reproducible Research.

Abstract

A minimal standard for data analysis and other scientific computations is that they be reproducible: that the code and data are assembled in a way so that another group can re-create all of the results (e.g., the figures and table in a paper). Adopting a workflow that will make your results reproducible will ultimately make your life easier; if a problem or question arises somewhere down the line, it will be much easier to correct or explain.

But organizing analyses so that they are reproducible is not easy. It requires diligence and a considerable investment of time: to learn new computational tools, and to organize and document analyses as you go. Nevertheless, partially reproducible is better than not at all reproducible. Just try to make your next paper or project better organized than the last. There are many paths toward reproducible research, and you shouldn’t try to change all aspects of your current practices all at once. Identify one weakness, adopt an improved approach, refine that a bit, and then move on to the next thing. Dr. Karl Broman will offer some suggestions for the initial steps to take towards making your work reproducible.

Faculty

Dr. Karl Broman is a Professor in the Department of Biostatistics & Medical Informatics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Dr. Broman is an applied statistician working on the genetics of complex diseases in experimental organisms. He develops the R package, R/qtl, has written a number of short tutorials useful for data scientists, and is very keen to develop tools for interactive data visualization (to view an example, click here).

Details

Date: Wednesday, December 16, 2020, 2:00-3:00PM

Registration

To attend, please enroll via Tufts CTSI I LEARN here.

 

CANCELLED
Center for Quantitative Methods and Data Science Seminar: Tanya Karagiannis, MS

This event is cancelled. We apologize for any inconvenience.

The Center for Quantitative Methods and Data Science, in partnership with the Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Research Design (BERD) Center and the Data-Intensive Studies Center (DISC) will host a Zoom seminar series on a Wednesday each month from 2:00-3:00PM.

The November session on Wednesday, November 11 will feature Tanya Karagiannis, MS. She will give a talk titled Analysis of Single Cell Transcriptomics Data as it Relates to Aging and Longevity.

Abstract

Studies of aging have shown a gradual decline in the immune system, such that people experience age-related disabilities and diseases as well as differences in immune population composition and functions over time. However, a rare population of individuals who reach 100 years of age known as centenarians, experience delay in age-related disabilities and diseases and in fact live the majority of their lives in good health. In order to investigate how centenarians delay and defy aging, we utilize single cell transcriptomic methods to investigate longevity related differences in the peripheral blood immune system of centenarians. Single cell level transcriptomic data has allowed for the profiling of thousands of cells to characterize cell states and populations in specific tissues. More specifically, these methods can be used to identify rare populations and assess transcriptional similarities and differences within a population of cells. We describe integrated analyses using four single cell RNA-sequencing datasets that we conducted to investigate compositional and gene expression differences in immune populations of centenarians and younger age controls (20-80 years). Early findings demonstrate gene expression differences between centenarians and younger age controls that are specific to populations of cells. We also find centenarians not only have cell type specific compositional differences but overall have more cell type diversity than younger age controls.

Faculty

Tanya Karagiannis is a Research Assistant at Tufts Medical Center in the Institute for Clinical Research and Health Policy Studies, working with Dr. Paola Sebastiani. She has an MS in Bioinformatics from Boston University where she is also continuing her PhD in Bioinformatics under the advisement of Dr. Paola Sebastiani and Dr. Stefano Monti. Her research focus is in the application and development of single cell transcriptomic methods utilizing machine learning and Bayesian statistics, with interest in multi-omics as well.

Details

Date: Wednesday, November 11, 2020, 2:00-3:00PM

Location: Zoom video conference.

Registration

To receive the link to the Zoom video conference, please register here.

 

Seminars & Workshops
Center for Quantitative Methods and Data Sciences Seminar: Cody Meissner, MD and Norma Terrin, PhD

The Center for Quantitative Methods and Data Sciences, in partnership with the Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Research Design (BERD) Center and the Data-Intensive Studies Center (DISC) will host a Zoom seminar series on a Wednesday each month from 2:00-3:00PM.

The October session on Wednesday, October 21 will feature Cody Meissner, MD, and Norma Terrin, PhD. They will speak about the promise of COVID-19 vaccines in controlling the pandemic.

Abstract

The discussion will cover approaches to SARS-CoV-2 vaccine development; emergency use authorization (EUA) vs. biologic license application (BLA); acceptable safety and effectiveness; unanticipated serious adverse reactions that occurred following introduction of previous vaccines; and vaccine trial sample size justification.

Faculty

Dr. Meissner is Professor of Pediatrics at Tufts University School of Medicine and Head of the Pediatric Infectious Disease Service at Tufts Medical Center. He is a Consultant to the Committee on Infectious Disease and an Associate Editor of the Red Book for the American Academy of Pediatrics. He has served as a member of the Advisory Committee on Infectious Diseases (ACIP) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and continues to advise CDC Work Groups. He presently serves as a member of the National vaccine Advisory Committee (NVAC) and as a member of the Vaccines and Related Biologic Products Advisory Committee (VRBPAC) for the Food and Drug Administration. He serves as a member of the Massachusetts Vaccine Purchasing Council. He has published over 250 papers on various aspects of infectious disease.

Dr. Terrin is the Scientific Director of the BERD Center at Tufts Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI) and Professor at Tufts University School of Medicine. She has collaborated with clinical investigators, including infectious disease researchers, throughout her career, and she served as Statistics Editor at Clinical Infectious Diseases for 12 years.

Details

Date: Wednesday, October 21, 2020, 2:00-3:00PM

Location: Zoom video conference. To receive the Zoom link and passcode, please email Lori Lyn Price, MAS at lprice1@tuftsmedicalcenter.org.

 

 

Seminars & Workshops
Center for Quantitative Methods and Data Sciences Seminar: Karin Knudson, PhD

The Center for Quantitative Methods and Data Sciences, in partnership with the Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Research Design (BERD) Center and the Data-Intensive Studies Center (DISC) will host a Zoom seminar series on the fourth Wednesday of the month from 2:00-3:00PM.

The first session on Wednesday, September 23 will feature Karin Knudson, PhD, Senior Data Scientist with DISC. She will speak about the estimation of ataxia severity and disease classification from wearable sensor recordings.

Abstract

Wearable sensor data offer the potential for rich and interpretable descriptions of behavioral characteristics of ataxia and other neurodegenerative diseases. High quality behavioral biomarkers are important for understanding disease progression, assessing efficacy in clinical trials, and supporting early diagnosis and targeted interventions. In this talk we present methods for using accelerometer and gyroscope time series data from wearable sensors in order to accurately distinguish patients with ataxia from healthy controls and to estimate disease severity. We combine information from an autoregressive hidden Markov model variant and time-frequency analysis to create a flexible, extensible, and meaningful quantitative description of movement and to perform severity estimation and disease classification with short periods of data collection.

Faculty

Dr. Knudson is a Senior Data Scientist with the Tufts Data Intensive Studies Center (DISC). Her research has involved the development and application of methods from machine learning, Bayesian statistics, and compressive sensing, particularly to neural data. Before joining Tufts, she was a Research Fellow in the Department of Neurology at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, and was previously the Chair of the Department of Mathematics, Statistics, and Computer Science at Phillips Academy. She completed her PhD in Mathematics at the University of Texas at Austin.

Details

Date: Wednesday, September 23, 2020, 2:00-3:00PM

Location: Zoom video conference. To receive the Zoom link and passcode, please email Lori Lyn Price, MAS at lprice1@tuftsmedicalcenter.org.

 

 

Meeting
Dissemination and Implementation Science Special Interest Group Meeting

Interested in learning more about implementation science and dissemination and implementation strategies?

You are invited to a virtual Dissemination and Implementation Science Special Interest Group Meeting on Tuesday, December 1, 10:00-11:00AM to present your research project, solicit feedback from other members, and receive advice from Tufts CTSI faculty leads Denise Daudelin, RN, MPH, and Sara Folta, PhD.

Even if you do not have a current project, you are welcome to join to learn more about this emerging field and hear from fellow researchers.

Details

Date: Tuesday, December 1, 10:00-11:00AM

Registration

To attend, please enroll here via Tufts CTSI I LEARN.

Seminars & Workshops
Evaluating Scientific Journal Articles

View the slides for this seminar (PDF).

View the article that will be discussed during this seminar (PDF).

 

What makes a journal article successful?

Join us for Evaluating Scientific Journal Articles and learn the questions you should ask yourself, whether reviewing journal articles or writing your own. This interactive seminar will be presented by Lori Lyn Price, MAS, Statistician in the Biostatistics, Epidemiology, and Research Design (BERD) Center.

By the end of this seminar you will be able to:

  • List the questions you should ask yourself when evaluating a scientific journal article.
  • Identify the specific, testable hypothesis of the paper.
  • Identify what type of study design was used.
  • Evaluate whether the results of the study were affected by bias.
  • Explain why this study was important, what it added to the literature, or how it changed health practice.
  • Appraise the compatibility of the conclusions of the study with the study objectives.

Details

Thursday, April 28th, 2016 1:00 – 2:30PM
Tufts Center for Medical Education, Room 114
145 Harrison Avenue, Boston

Or via live, interactive webcast (a link will be provided to those who register).

 

Seminars & Workshops
Research Database Creation: Basics and Best Practices

Overview

Are you involved in building a database for your research project?

Building an appropriate database for your study is critical to ensuring successful data collection and analysis. Learn how to build a database in this 90-minute Tufts CTSI workshop, Research Database Creation: Basics & Best Practices. This session will begin with an interactive lecture presented by Rachael Huebner, a Clinical Data Manager at Tufts CTSI, followed by a workshop in which participants will practice building a simple database in Excel.

This workshop is a prerequisite to a subsequent workshop, Research Database Creation: Building a REDCap Database.

After attending this event, you should be able to:

  • Recognize database creation best practices
  • Identify the clinical and demographic data needed to answer a study question
  • Effectively name and code variables
  • Create an Excel sheet appropriate for study data collection

Details

Date: Tuesday, October 29, 1:00-2:30PM

Location: Tufts Medical Center, IS Training Room, Ziskind Building, 1st Floor, Room 114A

This workshop is a prerequisite to a subsequent workshop, Research Database Creation: Building a REDCap Database.

Registration

This workshop is designed for research assistants, clinical research coordinators, investigators, residents, and fellows who will be creating or working with databases for research projects.

The workshop is now full. To add your name to the waitlist, please register here.

Tufts CTSI Professional Education & Expectation for Course Participants

Tufts CTSI’s Professional Education programs provide non-degree continuing education and training for clinical and translational research professionals from all Tufts CTSI partners and beyond.

Course enrollment priority is given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions. If your participation needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may provide their contact information when you register for the program.

This course is provided free of charge, and was supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of health, Award Number UL1TR002544. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

 

Seminars & Workshops
Research Database Creation: Basics and Best Practices 2020

Overview

Are you involved in building a database for your research project?

Building an appropriate database for your study is critical to ensuring successful data collection and analysis. Learn how to build a database in this 90-minute Tufts CTSI workshop, Research Database Creation: Basics & Best Practices. This session will begin with an interactive lecture presented by Rachael Huebner, a Clinical Data Manager at Tufts CTSI, followed by a workshop in which participants will practice building a simple database in Excel.

This workshop is a prerequisite to a subsequent workshop, Research Database Creation: Building a REDCap Database.  Please note, in this workshop, we will not be using REDCap, but we will be learning the fundamentals required for database creation, which will inform our second session where REDCap will be used.

After attending this event, you should be able to:

  • Recognize database creation best practices
  • Identify the clinical and demographic data needed to answer a study question
  • Effectively name and code variables
  • Create an Excel sheet appropriate for study data collection

Details

Date: Thursday, March 12, noon-1:30PM

Location: ONLINE ONLY

This workshop is a prerequisite to a subsequent workshop, Research Database Creation: Building a REDCap Database.

Registration

This workshop is designed for research assistants, clinical research coordinators, investigators, residents, and fellows who will be creating or working with databases for research projects.

To attend, please register here by March 5.

Tufts CTSI Professional Education & Expectation for Course Participants

Tufts CTSI’s Professional Education programs provide non-degree continuing education and training for clinical and translational research professionals from all Tufts CTSI partners and beyond.

Course enrollment priority is given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions. If your participation needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may provide their contact information when you register for the program.

This course is provided free of charge, and was supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of health, Award Number UL1TR002544. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

 

Seminars & Workshops
Research Database Creation: Building a REDCap Database

Overview

Are you involved in building a REDCap database for your research project?

REDCap is an online application that can be used to create research databases. It has many advantages over Excel, and is often the preferred tool for database creation. Learn how to create REDCap databases for your research projects in this 90-minute Tufts CTSI workshop, Research Database Creation: Building a REDCap Database.

This session will begin with a lecture presented by Rachael Huebner, a Clinical Data Manager at Tufts CTSI, followed by a workshop in which participants will practice building a simple database in REDCap.

To attend this event, participants must attend the first workshop in this series, Research Database Creation: Basics & Best Practices.

After attending this event, you should be able to:

  • Describe the differences between classic and longitudinal projects, and identify when to use each
  • Create projects, forms, and fields in REDCap
  • Export data from REDCap to Excel

Details

Date: Tuesday, November 12, 2:00-3:30PM

Location: Tufts Medical Center, IS Training Room, Ziskind Building, 1st Floor, Room 114A

To attend this event, participants must attend the first workshop in this series, Research Database Creation: Basics & Best Practices.

Registration

This workshop is designed for research assistants, clinical research coordinators, investigators, residents, and fellows who will be creating or working with databases for research projects.

Space is limited. To reserve your seat, please register here by October 24.

Tufts CTSI Professional Education & Expectation for Course Participants

Tufts CTSI’s Professional Education programs provide non-degree continuing education and training for clinical and translational research professionals from all Tufts CTSI partners and beyond.

Course enrollment priority is given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions. If your participation needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may provide their contact information when you register for the program.

This course is provided free of charge, and was supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of health, Award Number UL1TR002544. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

 

Seminars & Workshops
Research Database Creation: Building a REDCap Database 2020

Overview

Are you involved in building a REDCap database for your research project?

REDCap is an online application that can be used to create research databases. It has many advantages over Excel, and is often the preferred tool for database creation. Learn how to create REDCap databases for your research projects in this 90-minute Tufts CTSI workshop, Research Database Creation: Building a REDCap Database.

This session will consist of a guided tutorial, led by Rachael Huebner, Clinical Data Manager at Tufts CTSI, in which participants will build a simple database in REDCap.

To attend this event, participants must attend the first workshop in this series, Research Database Creation: Basics & Best Practices.

After attending this event, you should be able to:

  • Describe the differences between classic and longitudinal projects, and identify when to use each
  • Create projects, forms, and fields in REDCap
  • Export data from REDCap to Excel

Details

Date: Thursday, March 26, noon-1:30PM

Location: Tufts Center for Medical Education, Room 514 (Computer Lab), 145 Harrison Avenue, Boston

To attend this event, participants must attend the first workshop in this series, Research Database Creation: Basics & Best Practices.

Registration

This workshop is designed for research assistants, clinical research coordinators, investigators, residents, and fellows who will be creating or working with databases for research projects.

Space is limited.

To reserve your seat, please register here by March 19.

Tufts CTSI Professional Education & Expectation for Course Participants

Tufts CTSI’s Professional Education programs provide non-degree continuing education and training for clinical and translational research professionals from all Tufts CTSI partners and beyond.

Course enrollment priority is given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions. If your participation needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may provide their contact information when you register for the program.

This course is provided free of charge, and was supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of health, Award Number UL1TR002544. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

 

Seminars & Workshops
Research Database Development Part 1: Basics & Best Practices

Overview

Are you involved in building a REDCap database for your research project?

Building an appropriate database for your study is critical to ensuring successful data collection and analysis. Learn how to build your database in this three-part Research Database Development course presented by Tufts CTSI. There are no pre-requisites required for any of the three course registrations, but participation in all three courses is encouraged as they build on each other.

Part 1: Basics & Best Practices

This two-hour session will begin with an interactive lecture presented by Rachael Huebner, MPH, Clinical Data Manager at Tufts CTSI, followed by a workshop in which participants will practice building a simple database in Excel. Participation will be required for the workshop portion.

Pre-requisite: none

Topics covered include:

  • Database development best practices
  • Determining which data to collect
  • Choosing variable types
  • Naming variables
  • Assigning numbers to variables
  • Using Excel to create a database

After attending this session, participants should be able to:

  • Recognize database creation best practices
  • Identify the clinical and demographic data needed to answer a study question
  • Effectively name and code variables
  • Create an Excel sheet appropriate for study data collection

Details

Date: Wednesday, August 26, 10:00AM-noon

Location: online via Zoom

Registration

Members of any Tufts CTSI-affiliated institution are welcome to attend.

To receive the Zoom link, please register here.

Instructors

Rachael Huebner, MPH is the Clinical Data Manager at Tufts CTSI, providing data management support and training to researchers. Prior to joining Tufts, she worked in data management for industry-sponsored clinical trials after receiving her MPH from Boston University School of Public Health.

Ethan Goldstein is a Project Coordinator for the Informatics team at Tufts CTSI. He is responsible for REDCap user and application support. Ethan has been involved in REDCap database development for more than four years. He started at Brigham and Women’s Hospital where he designed REDCap-based systems for issue tracking and subject recruitment. He is a native of Boston, and a graduate of Clark University with a degree in Biology.

Tufts CTSI Professional Education & Expectation for Course Participants

Tufts CTSI’s Professional Education programs provide non-degree continuing education and training for clinical and translational research professionals from all Tufts CTSI partners and beyond.

Course enrollment priority is given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions. If your participation needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may provide their contact information when you register for the program.

This course is provided free of charge, and was supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of health, Award Number UL1TR002544. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

 

Seminars & Workshops
Research Database Development Part 2: Building a REDCap Database

Overview

Are you involved in building a REDCap database for your research project?

Building an appropriate database for your study is critical to ensuring successful data collection and analysis. Learn how to build your database in this three-part Research Database Development course presented by Tufts CTSI. There are no pre-requisites required for any of the three course registrations, but participation in all three courses is encouraged as they build on each other.

Part 2: Building a REDCap Database

This two-hour session will consist of a guided tutorial led by Ethan Goldstein, Informatics Project Coordinator at Tufts CTSI, followed by a discussion on building REDCap databases for your own research. Participants should be prepared to discuss their research projects. Instructors will work with you to create REDCap accounts prior to this session.

Topics covered include:

  • Introduction to REDCap
  • Creating projects, forms, and fields
  • Exporting data

After attending this session, participants should be able to:

  • Describe the differences between classic and longitudinal projects, and identify when to use each
  • Create projects, forms, and fields in REDCap
  • Export data from REDCap to Excel

Details

Date: Thursday, August 27, 10:00AM-noon

Location: online via Zoom

Registration

Members of any Tufts CTSI-affiliated institution are welcome to attend.

To receive the Zoom link, please register here.

Instructors

Rachael Huebner, MPH is the Clinical Data Manager at Tufts CTSI, providing data management support and training to researchers. Prior to joining Tufts, she worked in data management for industry-sponsored clinical trials after receiving her MPH from Boston University School of Public Health.

Ethan Goldstein is a Project Coordinator for the Informatics team at Tufts CTSI. He is responsible for REDCap user and application support. Ethan has been involved in REDCap database development for more than four years. He started at Brigham and Women’s Hospital where he designed REDCap-based systems for issue tracking and subject recruitment. He is a native of Boston, and a graduate of Clark University with a degree in Biology.

Tufts CTSI Professional Education & Expectation for Course Participants

Tufts CTSI’s Professional Education programs provide non-degree continuing education and training for clinical and translational research professionals from all Tufts CTSI partners and beyond.

Course enrollment priority is given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions. If your participation needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may provide their contact information when you register for the program.

This course is provided free of charge, and was supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of health, Award Number UL1TR002544. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

 

Seminars & Workshops
Research Database Development Part 3: Advanced REDCap Features

Overview

Are you involved in building a REDCap database for your research project?

Building an appropriate database for your study is critical to ensuring successful data collection and analysis. Learn how to build your database in this three-part Research Database Development course presented by Tufts CTSI. There are no pre-requisites required for any of the three course registrations, but participation in all three courses is encouraged as they build on each other.

Part 3: Advanced REDCap Features

This two-hour session will begin with a demonstration of commonly used advanced REDCap features, led by Ethan Goldstein, Informatics Project Coordinator at Tufts CTSI, followed by an interactive conversation answering participants’ real-life REDCap questions.

Topics covered include:

  • Complex piping and calculations within REDCap forms
  • Establishing workflows with the Survey Queue and Alerts and Notifications sections
  • Understanding how Action Tags can be used to help guide data collection
  • Ensuring high-quality input by establishing Data Quality rules

After attending this session, participants should be able to:

  • Identify use cases for advanced REDCap features
  • Implement commonly-used advanced features in REDCap projects

Details

Date: Friday, August 28, 10:00AM-noon

Location: online via Zoom

Registration

Members of any Tufts CTSI-affiliated institution are welcome to attend.

To receive the Zoom link, please register here.

Instructors

Rachael Huebner, MPH is the Clinical Data Manager at Tufts CTSI, providing data management support and training to researchers. Prior to joining Tufts, she worked in data management for industry-sponsored clinical trials after receiving her MPH from Boston University School of Public Health.

Ethan Goldstein is a Project Coordinator for the Informatics team at Tufts CTSI. He is responsible for REDCap user and application support. Ethan has been involved in REDCap database development for more than four years. He started at Brigham and Women’s Hospital where he designed REDCap-based systems for issue tracking and subject recruitment. He is a native of Boston, and a graduate of Clark University with a degree in Biology.

Tufts CTSI Professional Education & Expectation for Course Participants

Tufts CTSI’s Professional Education programs provide non-degree continuing education and training for clinical and translational research professionals from all Tufts CTSI partners and beyond.

Course enrollment priority is given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions. If your participation needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may provide their contact information when you register for the program.

This course is provided free of charge, and was supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of health, Award Number UL1TR002544. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.