Seminars & Workshops
2nd Annual Dissemination of Research Results Open House

Tufts CTSI cordially invites you to attend our 2nd Annual Dissemination of Research Results Open House!

This online event, held Wednesday, March 29 at 6:00PM EST, is an opportunity to learn about research happening at Tufts University and Baystate Health. Study participants will also have an opportnunity to learn about the results of the study in which they participated. This hour-long event will include two 15-minute presentations given by the researchers. The audience will also have a chance to ask questions following each presentation.

Presenters

Dr. Nancy Baker, Associate Professor, Occupational Therapy, Tufts University | “The Feasibility of Immersive Virtual Reality as a Treatment for Chronic Back Pain”

 

 

Dr. Elizabeth Peacock-Chambers, Department of Pediatrics, Baystate Health; Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, UMass Chan Medical School | “Assessment of a Train-the-Trainer Model for a Parenting Intervention for Mothers in Recovery”

 

Details

Live session via Zoom: Wednesday, March 29, 2023, 6:00PM-7:00PM EST 

Registration

Registration is required! Click here to register.

Information

If you have any questions, please contact Stasia Swiadas.

Seminars & Workshops
Obtaining Informed Consent: A Practical Approach

Does your work involve recruiting human research volunteers?

Join Tufts CTSI for a blended synchronous/asynchronous workshop focused on providing hands-on practice consenting simulated research participants. This two-part training includes a short online tutorial followed by a live Zoom meeting on January 31 where you will practice obtaining informed consent with community members, many of whom have been research participants themselves.  This is a learning and skill building opportunity for you and will not be evaluated in any way.

Participants must complete all of the pre-work on Tufts CTSI I LEARN in order to receive the Zoom link for the live training. While in the live workshop your active participation in the live role-play activity is required. You will also learn through providing feedback to others and engaging in group discussion. This will ensure that you get the most out of what this training has to offer.

Clinical research coordinators, investigators, research fellows, research nurses, and anyone involved in obtaining informed consent are encouraged to attend.

By the end of this workshop, participants of Parts 1 & 2 will be able to:

  • List the essential elements of informed consent.
  • Demonstrate (using plain language) in explaining the informed consent process, in a virtual setting.
  • Demonstrate multiple techniques to verify participants’ comprehension.
  • Identify 2-3 key considerations for obtaining informed consent in a remote or virtual setting.

Details

Live session via Zoom: Tuesday, January 31, 2022, 1:00PM-3:00PM 

Registration

To attend, please register here via Tufts CTSI I LEARN.

Prerequisite

CITI basic human subjects protection training. Participants will be required to upload proof of CITI completion to the Tufts CTSI I LEARN course site before the live session.

Seminars & Workshops
Biomedical and Health Data Science Collaborative (BHDSC) Virtual Seminar: “The Elephant in the Room: Unmeasured Confounding in Pharmacoepidemiology”

The Biomedical and Health Data Science Collaborative (BHDSC), a cross-disciplinary group formed by the Tufts Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI) and Institute for Clinical Research and Health Policy Studies (ICRHPS) at Tufts Medical Center, invites you to attend a virtual seminar on Wednesday, January 25, from 2:00PM-3:00PM. Jeremy P. Brown, PhD will give a talk titled “The Elephant in the Room: Unmeasured Confounding in Pharmacoepidemiology”.

Abstract

Unmeasured confounding is a major challenge to causal inference in pharmacoepidemiological research, as it can introduce bias and lead to incorrect conclusions. In this presentation, I will discuss methods for diagnosing, reducing, and quantifying unmeasured confounding in pharmacoepidemiological studies. These methods include negative controls, the high-dimensional propensity score, self-controlled study designs, and quantitative bias analysis. I will provide examples of these methods in action, as applied to two non-interventional studies conducted using UK electronic health records: one investigating the effect of proton pump inhibitors on mortality, and the other examining the effect of fluoroquinolones on aortic aneurysm or dissection. By using methods such as these, we can improve the accuracy and reliability of our findings and make more informed decisions about the safety and effectiveness of medications.

Speaker Bio

Jeremy Brown is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the CAUSALab at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. His research focuses on methods, and in particular causal inference methods, in pharmacoepidemiology and their application to understanding the safety and effectiveness of medications using insurance claims and electronic health records data. Prior to Harvard T.H. Chan he conducted his PhD in pharmacoepidemiology at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.

Details

Wednesday, January 25, 2023
2:00PM-3:00PM EST
Zoom Link: https://wellforce.zoom.us/j/91467788400?pwd=U2FXdTZRZENkdzdnQTYxczlWVCtFdz09&from=addon

Contact

Please contact Anastasia Gurinovich (agurinovich@tuftsmedicalcenter.org) and Ellaina Reed (ereed1@tuftsmedicalcenter.org) if you have any questions.

Feel free to pass on to others who may be interested.

Seminars & Workshops
Panel Discussion on Modern Computing Resources for Biomedical Data Science

You are invited to a panel discussion on “Modern Computing Resources for Biomedical Data Science” organized by the Biomedical and Health Data Science Collaborative (BHDSC), a cross-disciplinary group formed by Tufts CTSI and Institute for Clinical Research and Health Policy Studies (ICRHPS) at Tufts Medical Center.

The panel will be held Wednesday, December 7, 2022 from 2:00PM-4:00PM EST via Zoom (link below).

The goal of the panel is provide an overview of modern computing resources for omics data analyses, including in-house high-performance computing clusters, shared computing clusters, cloud computing, and hybrid solutions. Keeping in mind that one solution does not address all needs, we will invite a series of experts to share their own decisions and experiences with various computing solutions, their pros and cons, and their vision on where the field is going. The panel will also include few users who can share their own challenges/experiences.

Who Should Attend

Researchers who analyze genetic and genomic data.

Details

Wednesday, December 7, 2022, 2:00PM-4:00PM EST via Zoom.

Registration

Researchers and community members are encouraged to attend.

Language interpretation and translation services in Chinese Mandarin and Cantonese will be provided.

Space is limited! Please register here by September 23.

Flyer

Download, print, and share by clicking here.

Registration

For the event Zoom link, please click here.

Schedule

Opening remarks. 2:00-2:05. Dr Paola Sebastiani, ICRHPS, Tufts Medical Center

Part I: Example of existing system [2:05-3:15pm].
Moderator: Dr Rebecca Batorsky, Data Intensive Study Center (DISC), Tufts University. DISC is one of the centers that collaborate with the BHDSC.

  • 2:05-2:30. Dr Geraldine van der Aurwera, The Broad Institute. Computing challenges and emerging technology solutions in genetics and genomics.
  • 2:30-2:45. Dr Adelaide Rhodes, Tufts Technology Services, Tufts University. Emerging Challenges: A Bioinformatics Perspective.
  • 2:45-3:00. Dr Joseph Gormley, Tufts CTSI. AI applications and needed resources.
  • 3:00-3:15. Patrick Florance and Shawn Doughty, Research Technology, Tufts Technology Services. Tufts University Resources.

Part II: Panel Discussion: Experiences with different systems [3:15-4:00pm]
Moderators: Drs Batorsky, Rhodes and Sebastiani.

Panelists:

  • Dr Vijaya B. Kolachalama, Center for Computational Biomedicine. Boston University
  • Dr Honghuang Lin, Division of Health Systems Science and Program in Digital Medicine, University of Massachusetts Chan Medical School
  • Dr Albert Tai, Director of Tufts Genomics Core, Tufts University
  • Dr Heather Gardner, Department of Clinical Sciences, Tufts University
  • Dr Shira Rockowitz, Data Science Director at Boston Children’s Hospital
Seminars & Workshops
Panel Discussion on Modern Computing Resources for Biomedical Data Science

You are invited to a panel discussion on “Modern Computing Resources for Biomedical Data Science” organized by the Biomedical and Health Data Sciences Collaborative (BHDSC), a cross-disciplinary group formed by Tufts CTSI and Institute for Clinical Research and Health Policy Studies (ICRHPS) at Tufts Medical Center.

The panel will be held Wednesday, December 7, 2022 from 2:00PM-4:00PM EST via Zoom (link below).

The goal of the panel is provide an overview of modern computing resources for omics data analyses, including in-house high-performance computing clusters, shared computing clusters, cloud computing, and hybrid solutions. Keeping in mind that one solution does not address all needs, we will invite a series of experts to share their own decisions and experiences with various computing solutions, their pros and cons, and their vision on where the field is going. The panel will also include few users who can share their own challenges/experiences.

Who Should Attend

Researchers who analyze genetic and genomic data.

Details

Wednesday, December7, 2022, 2:00PM-4:00PM EST via Zoom.

Flyer

Download, print, and share by clicking here.

Registration

For the event Zoom link, please click here.

Schedule

Opening remarks. 2:00-2:05. Dr Paola Sebastiani, ICRHPS, Tufts Medical Center

Part I: Example of existing system [2:05-3:15pm].
Moderator: Dr Rebecca Batorsky, Data Intensive Study Center (DISC), Tufts University. DISC is one of the centers that collaborate with the BHDSC.

  • 2:05-2:30. Dr Geraldine van der Aurwera, The Broad Institute. Computing challenges and emerging technology solutions in genetics and genomics.
  • 2:30-2:45. Dr Adelaide Rhodes, Tufts Technology Services, Tufts University. Emerging Challenges: A Bioinformatics Perspective.
  • 2:45-3:00. Dr Joseph Gormley, Tufts CTSI. AI applications and needed resources.
  • 3:00-3:15. Patrick Florance and Shawn Doughty, Research Technology, Tufts Technology Services. Tufts University Resources.

Part II: Panel Discussion: Experiences with different systems [3:15-4:00pm]
Moderators: Drs Batorsky, Rhodes and Sebastiani.

Panelists:

  • Dr Vijaya B. Kolachalama, Center for Computational Biomedicine. Boston University
  • Dr Honghuang Lin, Division of Health Systems Science and Program in Digital Medicine, University of Massachusetts Chan Medical School
  • Dr Albert Tai, Director of Tufts Genomics Core, Tufts University
  • Dr Heather Gardner, Department of Clinical Sciences, Tufts University
  • Dr Shira Rockowitz, Data Science Director at Boston Children’s Hospital
Seminars & Workshops
Dissemination and Implementation (D&I) Science Special Interest Group Meeting, November 30

Interested in learning how researchers can address implementation in their effectiveness studies?

You are invited to a virtual Dissemination and Implementation Science Special Interest Group Meeting on Wednesday, November 30, 2022, 1:00PM-2:00PM EST.

The guest speaker for the meeting will be Rachel Gold, PhD, MPH. An open discussion will follow her presentation.

Dr. Gold is an epidemiologist and health services researcher. Her work focuses on using health information technology to improve care quality in public clinics and reduce health disparities, and on the implementation methods needed to support adoption of such technologies. She has partnered with the OCHIN practice-based research network since 2005; she now has a joint appointment at the Center for Health Research, where she is a Senior Investigator, and OCHIN, where she is the lead research scientist. Her work includes studying how to implement a multi-faceted quality improvement initiative that targeted cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes care in the Kaiser Permanente setting, in the context of community health centers serving socioeconomically vulnerable patient populations.

Dr. Gold is also studying the adoption and impact of an innovative point-of-care shared decision-making tool on CVD outcomes in community clinics. She also pilot-tested electronic health record-based tools for collecting and acting on patient-reported social risks (adverse social determinants of health), and is now studying how to help community clinics implement systematic social risk screening, and how to use patient-reported social risk data in clinical decision-making. Past efforts include analyzing the impact of state insurance policy changes on pediatric care in safety net clinics, and the relationship between continuous insurance coverage and receipt of diabetes care in community clinic settings.

Dr. Gold earned her MPH from Temple University and her PhD in epidemiology from the University of Washington.

Details

Live session via Zoom: Wednesday, November 30, 1:00PM-2:00PM EST

Registration

To receive the Zoom link to this event, please email Anna Thompson. All are welcome to attend and learn more about D&I!

Seminars & Workshops
Clinical Research Staff Quarterly Training: Integrating the Clinical Trials Management System into Your Research Workflow

Tufts Medical Center and Tufts CTSI Professional Education invite you to join them on Zoom on Thursday, December 15 at 1:00PM for the next Clinical Research Staff Quarterly Training session: “Integrating the “Clinical Trials Management System into Your Research Workflow.”

This quarter’s session is all about how research staff can use the Clinical Trials Management System (CTMS) to its full potential. Using the system is a requirement at Tufts MC and it’s designed to address the needs of research staff for activating new clinical studies, tracking clinical progress, and managing financials.

You’ll get a brief overview of the CTMS, then take a deeper look from four different perspectives: clinical research billing review, Research Administration, Research IT, and clinical research coordinator workflow. Learn from your peers in breakout rooms to see live demonstrations of the CTMS in action for different study activities. This is a great opportunity for advanced CTMS users to share their own tips and tricks with their peers, and for newer users to learn how other departments are using the CTMS. Come prepared to discuss your experience with the CTMS in breakout rooms.

Who Should Attend?

All clinical research staff involved in entering clinical trial data through the CTMS at Tufts MC are invited to attend. Both experienced and new users of the CTMS should attend.

Featured Speakers

Swetha Chinta, Research Analyst II, Tufts CTSI

Christian Lawlor, Clinical Research Coordinator III, Neely Cancer Center, Tufts Medical Center

Olivia Lovegreen, Director of Clinical Trials Office & Regulatory Operations, Tufts Medical Center

Danielle Riggs, Executive Director of Research Administration, Tufts Medical Center

Ajay Tupil, Clinical Research Coordinator I, Neely Cancer Center, Tufts Medical Center

Learning Objectives

By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the benefits of using the CTMS
  • Identify points in the research process when data should be entered into the CTMS
  • Describe the process for entering patient and study data into the CTMS
  • Describe how study data entered into the CTMS are used by Research Administration and clinical research billing review

Details

Thursday, December 15, 2022
1:00-2:00PM
Live online (a link will be sent to those who register).

Registration

To attend, please enroll here via Tufts CTSI I LEARN by noon on December 15, 2022.

For questions and further information, please email training@tuftsctsi.org.

Seminars & Workshops
Clinical Research Staff Quarterly Training: Best Practices for Completing Regulatory Documents

Are you utilizing best practices when completing regulatory documents?

Tufts Medical Center and Tufts CTSI Professional Education invite you to join us on September 15 for the next Clinical Research Staff Quarterly Training session. This interactive, live session will highlight best practices for completing and managing regulatory documents for industry-funded clinical trials. We will focus on the regulatory documents that are required before study initiation. You will also learn strategies for keeping a well-organized digital regulatory binder. Plus – participate in a team-based scavenger hunt activity for a chance to win a $5 Dunkin gift card for all team members.

Who Should Attend?

All clinical research staff involved in study start-up for industry-funded trials at Tufts MC are invited.

Featured Speaker

Vidya Iyer, MBBS, CPI, Director of Clinical Research at Tufts Medical Center

Learning Objectives

By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Identify the required documents for study start up
  • Distinguish between FDA-required and sponsor-specific forms
  • Discuss tips and tricks for completing regulatory documents
  • Utilize best practices for organizing regulatory forms in digital format (“Regulatory Binder”)

Details

Thursday, September 15, 2022
1:00-2:00PM
Live online (a link will be sent to those who register).

Registration

To attend, please enroll here via Tufts CTSI I LEARN by noon on September 15, 2022.

For questions and further information, please email Shane Cox.

 

Conferences & Symposia
第七屆亞裔健康研討會

屆亞裔健康研討會

揭開亞裔社區賭博問題的根源 : 從研究到行動

立即註冊,參加Tufts CTSIADAPT (通過轉化研究解決亞人口差異)聯盟的第七屆亞健康研討會揭開亞洲社區賭博問題的根本原因:從研究到行動

這個為期半天的研討會將於 2022,930, 星期五上午 9:00 至下午1:30 在塔夫茨醫學教育中心, #114 室, 145 Harrison Ave.波士頓唐人街舉行。

(早餐和登記: 9:00AM-9:30AM ;午餐和交流:12:30PM-1:30PM )

 

最近發布的Asian CARES 報告闡明了問題賭博如何成為亞社區的“煤礦中的金絲雀”。參加我們的研討會, 了解賭博成癮對兒童, 家庭和更廣泛的亞社區的根本原因及短期和長期影響, 以及如何通過使用公共衛生方法來解決賭博問題。

學習目標

  • 認識到導致賭博成為亞移民所支持的娛樂形式的根本原因和系統性條件。
  • 了解社區主導組織作為文化經紀人的作用, 非常適合提供語言項目, 服務和乾預措施,以解決亞移民社區的賭博問題。
  • 描述針對亞移民社區的賭場營銷策略示例, 並確定解決此問題的利益相關者和策略

細節

9月30日,星期五, 上午 9:00 -下午 1:30

塔夫茨醫學教育中心,#114 室 | 145 Harrison Ave.波士頓唐人街

 

傳單

請下載和分享活動傳單  英文版! 中文版!

登記

鼓勵研究人員和社區成員參加。

將提供中文(普通話和粵語)的翻譯服務。

座位有限!請在9月23日前註冊請在這裡註冊

 

議程

9:00-9:30   註冊及早餐

9:30-9:45   歡迎致辭

Alice Rushforth, 項目與合作副院長, Tufts CTSI

Kanchana Bhat,執行董事, Tufts CTSI

MyDzung Chu, ADAPT 主任, Tufts CTSI

Dawn Sauma ,ADAPT 聯合主席

亞洲反家庭暴力工作組 (ATASK) 聯合執行主任

 

9:45-10:00  主題演講

Ben Hires, 首席執行官 (Asian CARES 聯合首席研究員)

波士頓華埠社區中心 (BCNC)

 

10:00-11:00 小組討論(1):Asian CARES(解決研究、教育和服務中心)研究結果和建議:亞社區的賭博問題

主持人:Dawn Sauma ,聯合執行主任 (ADAPT 聯合主席)

亞洲反家庭暴力工作組 (ATASK)

 

小組成員:

Heang Leung Rubin, Asian CARES 聯合首席研究員

負責人兼創始人, CHIC Community Engagement Consulting, LLC

 

Yoyo Yau, 項目總監(Asian CARES 聯合首席研究員)

波士頓華埠社區中心(BCNC)

 

Geumhee Cho,Asian CARES 社區實地工作者

亞洲反家庭暴力工作組 (ATASK)

 

Shirley Zhen, 精神科-心理健康執業護士

南灣社區健康中心 (SCCHC)

 

討論/問答

 

11:00-11:10  休息

 

 

11:10-12:20 小組討論(2):股權審計:有針對性的賭場營銷對亞裔社區的影響

主持人Carolyn Wong,研究助理

亞裔美國人研究所 (Institute for Asian American Studies, UMASS Boston)

 

小組成員:

Ben Hires,首席執行官 (Asian CARES 聯合首席研究員)

波士頓華埠社區中心(BCNC)

 

Frank Poon, 董事

公盟教育 (Civic Education Alliance)

 

Sothea Chiemruom 執行董事

大洛厄爾柬埔寨互助協會(CMAA Lowell)

 

Mark Vander Linden,研究和負責任博彩總監

馬薩諸塞州博彩委員會 (Massachusetts Gaming Commission)

 

Mark Gottlieb, 執行董事

東北大學公共衛生倡導研究所 (Public Health Advocacy Institute, Northeastern University)

 

討論/問答

 

12:20-12:30 總結和閉幕詞

MyDzung Chu, ADAPT 主任, Tufts CTSI

 

12:30-1:30  午餐與交流

 

本次活動免費提供,並得到了美國國立衛生研究院國家轉化科學促進中心的支持,獎號為 UL1TR002544。內容完全由作者負責,並不一定代表 NIH 的官方觀點。

 

This event is provided free of charge, and was supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of health, Award Number UL1TR002544. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

Conferences & Symposia
7th Annual Asian Health Symposium

Thank you for your interest in Tufts CTSI’s 7th Annual Asian Health Symposium! Registration has closed. The event will be recorded. If you would like to be notified when recordings are available, please email Tufts CTSI Professional Education.

 

*To translate this page, please click here*

Unpacking the Root Causes of Problem Gambling in the Asian Community: From Research to Action

Register now to join Tufts CTSI and the Addressing Disparities in Asian Populations through Translational Research (ADAPT) Coalition for the 7th Annual Asian Health Symposium “Unpacking the Root Causes of Problem Gambling in the Asian Community: From Research to Action.”

This half-day in-person event will be held Friday, September 30, 2022 from 9:00AM-1:30PM on the Tufts Health Sciences Campus. (Breakfast and Registration: 9:00AM-9:30AM; Lunch and Networking: 12:30PM-1:30PM)

The recently launched Asian CARES report illuminates how problem gambling is the “canary in the coal mine” for the Asian community. Join us to learn about the root causes as well as the short and long-term impacts of gambling addiction on children, families, and the broader Asian community and how problem gambling can be addressed by using a public health approach.

Learning Objectives:

  • Recognize the root causes and systemic conditions that lead to gambling as the espoused form of entertainment for Asian immigrants.
  • Understand the role of community-led organizations as cultural brokers well-suited to provide in-language programs, services, and interventions addressing problem gambling in the Asian immigrant communities.
  • Describe examples of casino marketing tactics targeting the Asian immigrant communities and identify stakeholders and strategies to address this issue.

Details

Friday, September 30, 2022, 9:00AM-1:30PM
Center for Medical Education, Room #114 | 145 Harrison Ave. — Chinatown, Boston

Flyer

Download and share the English version and translated version!

To visit the translated version of this event page, please click here.

Registration

Researchers and community members are encouraged to attend.

Language interpretation and translation services in Chinese Mandarin and Cantonese will be provided.

Space is limited! Please register here by September 23.

Speaker Biographies

To download biographies of all our panelists and speakers, please click here.

Agenda

9:00-9:30         Registration and Breakfast

 

9:30-9:45         Welcome and Opening Remarks

Alice Rushforth, Associate Dean of Programs and Partnerships, Tufts CTSI

Kanchana Bhat, Executive Director Tufts CTSI

MyDzung Chu, ADAPT Director, Tufts CTSI

Dawn Sauma, ADAPT Co-Chair

Co-Executive Director, Asian Task Force Against Domestic Violence (ATASK)

 

9:45-10:00       Keynote

Ben Hires, Chief Executive Officer, Asian CARES Co-Principal Investigator

Boston Chinatown Neighborhood Center (BCNC)

 

10:00-11:00     Panel 1: Asian CARES (Center for Addressing Research, Education and Services) Research Findings and Recommendations: Problem Gambling in the Asian Community

Moderator: Dawn Sauma, ADAPT Co-Chair

Co-Executive Director, Asian Task Force Against Domestic Violence (ATASK)

 

Heang Leung Rubin, Asian CARES Co-Principal Investigator

Principal and Founder, CHIC Community Engagement Consulting, LLC

 

Yoyo Yau, Chief Program Officer (Asian CARES Co-Principal Investigator)

Boston Chinatown Neighborhood Center (BCNC)

 

Geumhee Cho, Korean Client Navigator (Asian CARES Community Fieldworker)

Asian Task Force Against Domestic Violence (ATASK)

 

Shirley Zhen, Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurse Practitioner

South Cove Community Health Center (SCCHC)

 

Discussion / Q & A

 

11:00-11:10    BREAK

 

11:10-12:20     Panel 2: Equity Audit: Impact of Targeted Casino Marketing on the Asian                                 Communities

Moderator: Carolyn Wong, Research Associate

Institute for Asian American Studies, UMass Boston

Panelists:

Ben Hires, Chief Executive Officer, Asian CARES Co-Principal Investigator

Boston Chinatown Neighborhood Center (BCNC)

 

Frank Poon, Director

Civic Education Alliance Inc.

 

Mark Vander Linden, Director of Research and Responsible Gaming

Massachusetts Gaming Commission

 

Mark Gottlieb, Executive Director

Public Health Advocacy Institute, Northeastern University

 

Discussion / Q & A

 

12:20-12:30     Summary and Closing Remarks

MyDzung Chu, ADAPT Director, Tufts CTSI

 

12:30-1:30       Lunch & Networking

 

This event is provided free of charge, and was supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of health, Award Number UL1TR002544. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

Seminars & Workshops
Obtaining Informed Consent: A Practical Approach

Are you a clinical research team member, obtaining informed consent from human research volunteers?

Could you or your team use information on best practices and strategies for obtaining informed consent?

Join Tufts CTSI for a blended synchronous/asynchronous workshop focused on providing hands-on practice consenting research participants. This training will take place in two parts.

Part 1 of this workshop will be offered online, self-paced through Tufts CTSI I LEARN.

Part 2 of the workshop will take place in a live Zoom meeting and provide an opportunity to practice obtaining informed consent with members of Tufts CTSI’s Stakeholder Expert Panel. Panel members are former research participants and individuals with experience as simulated patients. This is a learning and skill building opportunity for you and will not be evaluated in any way.

Participants must complete all of the pre-work on Tufts CTSI I LEARN in order to receive the Zoom link for the live training. While in the live workshop your active participation in the live role-play activity is required. You will also learn through providing feedback to others and engaging in group discussion. This will ensure that you get the most out of what this training has to offer.

Clinical research coordinators, investigators, research fellows, research nurses, and anyone involved in obtaining informed consent are encouraged to attend.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this workshop, participants of Parts 1 & 2 will be able to:

  • List the essential elements of informed consent.
  • Demonstrate (using plain language) in explaining the informed consent process, in a virtual setting.
  • Demonstrate multiple techniques to verify participants’ comprehension.
  • Identify 2-3 key considerations for obtaining informed consent in a remote or virtual setting.

Details

Live Session: Thursday, June 23, 2022
10:00AM-noon
Online via Zoom (a link will be sent to those who register and complete the I LEARN pre-work).

Registration

To attend, please enroll here via Tufts CTSI I LEARN by Thursday, June 16, 2022.

Prerequisite: CITI basic human subjects protection training. Participants will be required to upload proof of CITI completion to the Tufts CTSI I LEARN course site before the live session.

Seminars & Workshops
An Evening With CREST: A Collaboration for Research, Equity, Sustainability, and Trust

Come get to know CREST! An academic-community collaboration dedicated to improving the health of Black and Brown Bostonians.

The Collaboration for Research, Equity, Sustainability, and Trust (CREST) invites you to join us for An Evening with CREST: Improving the Health of our Black and Brown Communities on Monday, May 23 from 6:00PM-7:30PM at Roxbury Community College.

The event will feature:

  • An introduction to CREST and its core partner organizations
  • A panel discussion on healing communities and promoting health equity through community-partnered research
  • Networking opportunities for researchers, community members, and other stakeholders

We are delighted to present our current membership which consists of five grassroots organizations: Rounding the Bases, Inc., Union Capital Boston, CSI Support & Development, Greater Boston Section – National Council of Negro Women, and the Authentic Caribbean Foundation.

Light refreshments will be served.

We hope you can join us for CREST’s first public event!

Details

Monday, May 23, 2022

6:00PM-7:30PM

In person: Roxbury Community College, 1234 Columbus Ave., Boston, MA 02120

Via Zoom: see below

Registration

To attend, please register here as in-person space will be limited. Please indicate whether you will be attending in-person or via Zoom on your order form.

 

 

Seminars & Workshops
FRESH& Joyful Cooking Cooking Class: Juneteenth Recipes with Janna Adkins

Want to experience the joy of Juneteenth this summer with some amazing, healthy recipes?

The National Council of Negro Women (NCNW)-Greater Boston Section and Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy have partnered to develop FRESH& – a monthly webinar series that will explore a range of nutrition topics. FRESH& is designed to engage Black women in discussing their diet and nutrition in a culturally competent, celebratory way. Each month attendees will explore topics like how to make healthy, culturally relevant meals, boost their immune systems through diet, and coping with stress through food.

This month, we are excited to present FRESH& Joyful Cooking: Juneteenth Recipes with Janna Adkins on Thursday, May 19, 6:00PM-7:00PM EST. During the event, we will review simple changes to some of Janna’s favorite recipes that can have a big impact on health. Don’t worry about skipping out on your favorites. FRESH& has you covered so you can experience the joy of Juneteenth this summer!

Janna earned her MS in Nutrition Interventions, Communication, and Behavior Change in May 2021 and is a current doctoral student at Tufts FSNSP. She studies how to make nutritious food accessible to everyone. During her studies at Tufts FSNSP, Janna has learned the importance of social justice and food equity, and she hopes to apply these concepts to her work. She is interested in developing community nutrition interventions and building social capital. She believes that food is a universal language with the power to connect us all. In her free time, she likes to ride her bike and go on long nature walks. Janna is excited to exchange her nutrition knowledge with everyone who seeks to lead healthier lives.

Details

Thursday, May 19, 2022
6:00-7:00PM
Online (a link will be sent to those who register).

Registration

To attend, please register here.

 

 

Meeting
Dissemination and Implementation Science Special Interest Group Meeting, June 14

Interested in learning more about implementation science and dissemination and implementation strategies?

You are invited to a virtual Dissemination and Implementation Science Special Interest Group Meeting on Tuesday, June 14, 2022, 3:00-4:00PM EST. We hope you will join us to discuss dealing with unintended consequences in D&I research.

Dr. Sara Folta will discuss how screening tools can adversely affect enrollment of underrepresented persons, and will also share a recent example of building in qualitative methods to detect unintended consequences as part of a proposed study to evaluate an intervention.

Dr. Jacob van den Berg will discuss how to closely monitor and respond to the community’s perception of a study through social media.

There will be plenty of time for open discussion around this topic.

Details

Date: Tuesday, June 14, 3:00-4:00PM EST, via Zoom

Registration

If you are interested in joining and do not already have the Zoom link, please email Alyssa Cabrera, MPH. All are welcome to attend and learn more about D&I!

Seminars & Workshops
Clinical Research Staff Quarterly Training: Career Paths in Research

Where can you go from here?

Tufts Medical Center and Tufts CTSI Professional Education invite you to join us on May 19 for the next Clinical Research Staff Quarterly Training session.

In this session we feature a panel discussion focused on the variety of traditional and non-traditional careers in clinical and translational research. Hear success stories of Tufts Medical Center research staff. Learn how you can leverage the skills you are developing now into avenues you might not have considered. This will be an interactive session, and we encourage you to send us your questions in advance – we can’t wait to see you there!

Research coordinators and anyone else interested in learning about research career paths are invited to attend.

Learning Objectives

After attending this event, participants should be able to:

  • Identify at least three possible career paths for research coordinators.
  • Describe the transferable skills developed by working as research staff.
  • Identify certifications and other educational options for career advancement.

Details

Thursday, May 19, 2022
1:00-2:00PM
Live online (a link will be sent to those who register).

Registration

To attend, please enroll here via Tufts CTSI I LEARN by noon on May 19, 2022.

For further information, please email Shane Cox.

 

Conferences & Symposia
24th Annual Clinical and Translational Science Graduate Program Symposium

Overview

The 24th Annual Clinical and Translational Science (CTS) Graduate Program Symposium will be Friday, May 6, 2022, 8:00AM-1:00PM, in Wolff Auditorium and the Atrium at Tufts Medical Center.

This year’s keynote speaker is Moira Kapral, MD, MSc, FRCPC, Professor of Medicine and Director, Division of General Internal Medicine at the University of Toronto and the Lillian Love Chair in Women’s Health, University Health Network and University of Toronto.

Dr. Kapral will give a talk at the Tufts Medical Center Grand Rounds at noon.

The event will also feature presentations and posters by students enrolled in the CTS Graduate Program.

A detailed schedule will be available soon.

Schedule of Events

  • 8:00AM: Continental Breakfast, Tufts Medical Center’s Stearns Auditorium
  • 8:15AM: Welcome
    • David Kent, MD, MSc
      Director, Graduate Program in Clinical and Translational Science
  • 8:30AM: Presentations by Graduating Students
    • Emma Price, VMD, MS
    • Caroline Hsu, MD, MS
    • Dara Azuma, MD, MS
    • Anita Kumar, PhD, MD, MSCE
  • 9:30AM: Academic Poster Exhibit and Photo Opportunity for Students and Faculty, Tufts Medical Center Atrium
  • 10:30AM: Presentations by Graduating Students
    • Natalie Pawlak, MD, MS
    • Jessica Penney, MD, MS
    • Charles Cummings, DVM, MS
  • 11:15AM: Closing Remarks
    • David Kent, MD, MSc
  • 11:30AM: Adjourn in Stearns Auditorium
  • 12:00PM: Keynote Lecture/Medical Grand Rounds in Tufts Medical Center’s Wolff Auditorium

Registration

To RSVP, please email info@tuftsctsi.org.

Seminars & Workshops
Scientific Manuscript Writing Workshops – Summer 2022

Need to transform your ideas into a publishable peer reviewed manuscript?

Finding it difficult to write alone without assistance and constructive feedback?

Join Tufts CTSI this summer to begin writing and refining the core sections of your manuscript draft with your colleagues and a highly experienced editor.

Details

Overview

Tufts CTSI is excited to recruit up to 10 motivated clinical or public health researchers to join a live, online workshop series designed to get you started on efficient manuscript writing. Our experienced editor and chronic disease epidemiologist, Robert Goldberg, PhD,  will provide guidance on the elements of preparing successful manuscripts for peer reviewed scientific journals including navigating major journals, scientific writing style, and approaches to sentence composition.The program is focused solely on hands-on writing exercises and peer review with expert coaching on manuscript style and content. The participants will incorporate class feedback and submit a new draft each session with a goal of polishing each section of their scientific manuscript in the IMRAD (Introduction, Methods, Results, and Discussion) format.

By the end of this series, you will have completed a solid working draft of a manuscript that will be either ready for peer reviewed submission to a journal or will be close to submission with some additional final polishing needed.

Workshop Faculty

  • Main Instructor: Robert J. Goldberg, PhD, Professor, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Department of Population and Quantitative Health Sciences

Learning Objectives

By the end of this workshop series, you should be able to:

  • Discuss the core components of a successful scientific manuscript.
  • Identify strategies and steps for completing a full manuscript for peer review submission.
  • Anticipate reviewers’ concerns in discussing and presenting your research and how to best respond to these concerns.

Expectation for Homework and Your Commitment

Registration is on a first come, first served, basis and priorities are given to members of Tufts CTSI partner institutions. All participants will be required to submit, at the time of application, a draft manuscript with a minimum of the introduction and methods sections. Data/results are preferred but are not required for participation. We will confirm your enrollment as soon we finalize the registration list.

Class attendance is critical to this peer review-based format. If your participation in these workshops needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, please secure that approval before submitting your registration application.

You will be expected to be actively engaged in classroom discussion, including presenting your drafts for critique by the course instructor and other course attendees. We ask participants to come open-minded and be receptive to both provide and receive constructive feedback.

Dates and Location

Location: Online via Zoom

  • Session I: Tuesday, June 14 1:30PM–3:00PM
  • Session II: Tuesday, June 28, 1:30PM–3:00PM
  • Session III: Tuesday, July 12, 1:30PM-3:00PM

Additionally, Dr. Goldberg will be available the week of July 25 to provide final feedback on all submitted drafts.

Registration and Requirements

A total of 10 slots are available for those who commit to attending and submitting their manuscript drafts prior to all sessions. Manuscripts must be targeted to clinical and translational science or public health journals.

Please note: Registration is now closed

All subsequent manuscript submissions and other assignments will be handled through the course site on the Tufts CTSI I LEARN platform. All accepted participants will be required to sign up for a free I LEARN account to complete their enrollment in the course.

Tufts CTSI Professional Education

Tufts CTSI’s Professional Education programs provide non-degree continuing education and training for clinical and translational research professionals from all Tufts CTSI partners and beyond.

This course is provided free of charge and is supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Award Number UL1TR002544.  The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

 

Seminars & Workshops
FRESH& Healthy Snacking with Sarah Kerrigan

Fresh& Healthy Snacking event graphic

Want turn a guilty pleasure into a quick, nutritious activity?

The National Council of Negro Women (NCNW)-Greater Boston Section and Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy have partnered to develop FRESH& – a monthly webinar series that will explore a range of nutrition topics. FRESH& is designed to engage Black women in discussing their diet and nutrition in a culturally competent, celebratory way. Each month attendees will explore topics like how to make healthy, culturally relevant meals, boost their immune systems through diet, and coping with stress through food.

This month, we are excited to present FRESH& Healthy Snacking with Sarah Kerrigan on Wednesday, March 30, 6:00PM-7:00PM EST.

FRESH& is on snack duty this month! Learn how to turn a guilty pleasure into a quick, nutritious activity with FRESH& Healthy Snacking. In honor of Women’s History Month, the snacks we make will be filled with nutrients that are especially beneficial to women. Sarah will prepare a Greek yogurt parfait, granola bars, and baked crunchy chickpeas. Follow along to make your snacks for the week.

Sarah Kerrigan is a graduate student at Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science & Policy getting her Master’s degree in Nutrition Interventions, Communication, & Behavior Change. She is a member of the Didactic Program in Dietetics at Simmons University. Sarah graduated from Providence College with a BA in Mathematics & Economics in 2020. After working in the finance field for a year, she decided to make a career change and pursue her true passion, nutrition. Sarah hopes to work as a Registered Dietitian working with athletes and those with disordered eating and eating disorders. She is passionate about helping people create a healthy relationship with food. In her free time, Sarah loves being outdoors. She enjoys running, hiking, or just sitting at the beach. We’ll be cheering for her in the 2022 Boston Marathon!

Details

Wednesday, March 30, 2022
6;00-7:00PM
Online (a link will and list of ingredients will be sent to those who register).

Registration

To attend, please register here.

 

The Greater Boston Section – National Council of Negro Women (GBS-NCNW) has partnered with Tufts Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI) to build the Collaboration for Research, Equity, Sustainability, and Trust (CREST). CREST is an academic-community partnership that works with Black and Brown communities in the Greater Boston Area to improve health. We are proud to present the FRESH& series as a product of successful collaboration between Tufts and GBS-NCNW.

 

Seminars & Workshops
Center for Quantitative Methods and Data Science Seminar 2022: Peter Pirolli, PhD

Computational Cognitive Models of Behavior Change in the Real World and at Scale

This seminar of the Center for Quantitative Methods and Data Science (QM&DS), in partnership with the Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Research Design (BERD) Center at Tufts CTSI and the Data-Intensive Studies Center (DISC) at Tufts University, is Wednesday, March 30, 2:00-3:00PM via Zoom. The topic is Computational Cognitive Models of Behavior Change in the Real World and At Scale, presented by Peter Pirolli, PhD.

Psychology calls itself the science of behavior, but some have lamented that “cognitive psychology [has] never had much to say about the meaningful activities people perform in their daily lives, nor have they really intended to.” In this presentation, Dr. Pirolli discusses two threads of research on computational cognitive models of human behavior change in the ecology of everyday life:

  • The first thread of research concerns models of health behavior change occurring in multi-week, in-the-world, experiments using mobile health applications designed to promote physical activity, stress reduction, and improved nutrition habits. These computational models, built in the ACT-R cognitive architecture, provide an integrated account of goal intentions, implementation intentions, self-efficacy, motivation, self-affirmation, and habit strengthening underlying more than a half dozen behavior change techniques.
  • The second thread of research expands on ACT-R models of behavior change to address how humans responded to the COVID-19 pandemic. Heterogeneous behavioral responses over time and geographical regions depend on the individual beliefs and information consumption patterns of populations. To address the need for more precise and accurate epidemiological models, we are researching Psychologically Valid Agent models of human responses to epidemic information and non-pharmaceutical interventions during the pandemic.

Faculty

Peter Pirolli, PhD is currently a Senior Research Scientist at the Institute for Human and Machine Cognition. His research involves a mix of cognitive science, artificial intelligence, and human-computer interaction, with applications in digital health, sensemaking, and information foraging, among other things. Previously, Dr. Pirolli was at the Palo Alto Reseach Center, and was a Professor in the School of Education at UC Berkeley. He received his doctorate in cognitive psychology from Carnegie Mellon University in 1985. Dr. Pirolli received a B.Sc. in psychology and anthropology from Trent University. He has been elected as a Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Psychological Association (Div 3 and Div 21), the Association for Psychological Science, the National Academy of Education, and the ACM Computer-Human Interaction Academy. Please see his book titled “Information Foraging Theory: Adaptive Interaction with Information.”

 

Details

Wednesday, March 30, 2022, 2:00-3:00PM, via Zoom

Registration

To attend, please register here via Tufts CTSI I LEARN.

 

 

 

Meeting
Dissemination and Implementation Science Special Interest Group Meeting, March 21

Interested in learning more about implementation science and dissemination and implementation strategies?

You are invited to a virtual Dissemination and Implementation Science Special Interest Group Meeting on Monday, March 21, 2022, 10:00-11:00AM.

In this session, the guest presenter and discussion leader will be Linda Hudson, ScD, MSPH. Dr. Hudson is the Associate Director of Integrating Underrepresented Populations in Research (IUPR) and the Director of Collaboration for Research Equity, Sustainability, and Trust (CREST). She will discuss how to use an anti-racist health equity lens when approaching D&I work, as well as sharing her experience working on CREST.

The session will also include a brief discussion of Baumann’s Reframing implementation Science to Address Inequities in Healthcare Delivery article. Please review it prior to attending.

You are also invited to read an optional article, Implementation Science Should Give Higher Priority to Health Equity.

Details

Date: Monday, March 21, 10:00AM-11:00AM, via Zoom

Registration

To receive the Zoom link to this event, please email Senior Project Manager Alyssa Cabrera, MPH.

Seminars & Workshops
FRESH& Fun Cooking for Mental Wellness with Dina E. Cote

Fresh& Fun Cooking for Mental Wellness info

Want a 3-course family meal in one hour?..For less than $10?…With ingredients that can help reduce stress and improve sleep?

The National Council of Negro Women (NCNW)-Greater Boston Section and Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy have partnered to develop FRESH& – a monthly webinar series that will explore a range of nutrition topics. FRESH& is designed to engage Black women in discussing their diet and nutrition in a culturally competent, celebratory way. Each month attendees will explore topics like how to make healthy, culturally relevant meals, boost their immune systems through diet, and coping with stress through food.

This month, we are excited to present FRESH& Fun Cooking for Mental Wellness with Dina E. Cote on Wednesday, February 23, 7:00PM-8:00PM EST.

Dina E. Cote, a current graduate student at Tufts specializing in Nutrition and Food Security Policy and Programming at the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, will show us how to prepare a 3-course family meal in one hour. Nothing too fancy, but everything will be flavorful, nutritious and less than $10. We will explore how different ingredients can be used to reduce our stress levels and improve our sleep. Grab your ingredients and get ready to cook well, eat well, and be well!

Details

Wednesday, February 23, 2022
7;00-8:00PM
Online (a link will be sent to those who register).

Registration

To attend, please register here.

 

 

Seminars & Workshops
Spring 2022 Faculty Mentor Training – Session 2

Want to be a more effective research mentor?

Join us in April 2022 for one of two case-based training opportunities for faculty members with mentees preparing for research careers in biomedical, behavioral, clinical, and social sciences.

If you are responsible for mentoring Tufts CTSI’s graduate education program’s fellows (TL1) and scholars (KL2), this is a great opportunity to complete the mentor training recommended every other year.

Meet peers and faculty members with expertise in mentoring and career development, and advance your skills in:

  • Goal-setting and alignment
  • Feedback (giving and receiving)
  • Diversity and unconscious bias
  • Relational boundaries
  • Wellness and resiliency.

Requirements for the training:

  • Complete online pre-work (approximately 45 minutes) on the Tufts CTSI I LEARN platform prior to attending the live session.
  • Participate actively during the live session (3 hours) and share mentoring experiences.
  • Answer follow-up surveys about the outcomes and impact of this training on your mentees.

After completing one of these sessions, you should be able to:

  • Describe the difference between advising, coaching, and mentoring.
  • Explain the importance of communication in the mentor/mentee relationship.
  • Discuss common mentoring challenges and possible solutions.
  • Identify mentoring tools and resources that you can use with your mentees.
  • Articulate ways that wellness and resiliency strategies can be integrated into the mentoring process.

Details

Monday April 25, 1:00-4:00PM EDT, via Zoom

Each session is limited to 8-12 participants to optimize small group and peer learning. Admission to mentor training is by open to faculty at any rank and is open to faculty across our partner network. Please register for only ONE session.

Submit your application for this session by April 18, 2022.

 

 

Seminars & Workshops
Spring 2022 Faculty Mentor Training – Session 1

Want to be a more effective research mentor?

Join us in April 2022 for one of two case-based training opportunities for faculty members with mentees preparing for research careers in biomedical, behavioral, clinical, and social sciences.

If you are responsible for mentoring Tufts CTSI’s graduate education program’s fellows (TL1) and scholars (KL2), this is a great opportunity to complete the mentor training recommended every other year.

Meet peers and faculty members with expertise in mentoring and career development, and advance your skills in:

  • Goal-setting and alignment
  • Feedback (giving and receiving)
  • Diversity and unconscious bias
  • Relational boundaries
  • Wellness and resiliency.

Requirements for the training:

  • Complete online pre-work (approximately 45 minutes) on the Tufts CTSI I LEARN platform prior to attending the live session.
  • Participate actively during the live session (3 hours) and share mentoring experiences.
  • Answer follow-up surveys about the outcomes and impact of this training on your mentees.

After completing one of these sessions, you should be able to:

  • Describe the difference between advising, coaching, and mentoring.
  • Explain the importance of communication in the mentor/mentee relationship.
  • Discuss common mentoring challenges and possible solutions.
  • Identify mentoring tools and resources that you can use with your mentees.
  • Articulate ways that wellness and resiliency strategies can be integrated into the mentoring process.

Details

Monday April 4, 1:00-4:00PM EDT, via Zoom

Each session is limited to 8-12 participants to optimize small group and peer learning. Admission to mentor training is by open to faculty at any rank and is open to faculty across our partner network. Please register for only ONE session.

Submit your application for this session by March 28, 2022.

 

 

Seminars & Workshops
Center for Quantitative Methods and Data Science Seminar 2022: Nicholas Schork, PhD

N-of-1 and Aggregated N-of-1 Trials: Motivation, Applications and Future Directions

This seminar of the Center for Quantitative Methods and Data Science (QM&DS), in partnership with the Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Research Design (BERD) Center at Tufts CTSI and the Data-Intensive Studies Center (DISC) at Tufts University, is Wednesday, March 2, 11:00AM-noon via Zoom. The topic is N-of-1 and Aggregated N-of-1 Trials: Motivation, Applications and Future Directions, presented by Nicholas Schork, PhD.

There is tremendous interest in advancing ‘personalized’ or ‘precision’ medicine — the idea that one can tailor more effective health interventions to an individual’s unique genetic, physiological, behavioral and exposure profile. Although there have been major success stories in personalized medicine, particularly in cancer treatment settings, testing personalized interventions requires non-traditional study designs such as N-of-1 (single subject) and aggregated N-of-1 studies. Dr. Schork describes the principals behind N-of-1 trials as well as strategies for pursuing them in comprehensive and efficient ways. In particular, he describes study designs that consider the effect of individual components making up a multiple component intervention, the sequential analysis of aggregated N-of-1 trials, ’systems physiology’ studies of intervention effects in individuals, and the broad use of guided smart phone apps to optimize mental health interventions for individuals.

Faculty

Nicholas Schork, PhD is a Deputy Director and Distinguished Professor of Quantitative Medicine at The Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), an affiliate of the City of Hope (COH) National Medical Center, and an Adjunct Professor of Medicine and Population Science at COH. He is also an Adjunct Professor of Psychiatry and Biostatistics at the University of California San Diego (UCSD) as well as Adjunct Professor of Integrative Structural and Computational Biology at Scripps Research.

Prior to joining TGen, Dr. Schork held faculty positions at Scripps Research, the J. Craig Venter Institute, UCSD and Case Western Reserve University. Dr. Schork’s interests and expertise are in the quantitative aspects of human biology research, genetics, and integrated approaches to complex biological and medical problems. These interests include analyzing large biomedical data sets, developing systems-level approaches to the analysis of biomedical data, and the design of personalized clinical trials.

Dr. Schork has published more than 550 scientific articles and book chapters. He has mentored over 75 graduate students and post-doctoral fellows, has 12 patents, and has been involved in establishing over 10 different companies in the biomedical space. A member of several scientific journal editorial boards, Dr. Schork is a frequent participant in NIH-related steering committees and review boards. He is currently scientific director and a principal investigator for the NIA-sponsored Longevity Consortium and the Integrated Longevity OMICS initiative, two multi-million-dollar initiatives to identify and characterize genetically-mediated factors contributing to human longevity and healthspan. He is also a former member of the National Academy of Science, Engineering and Medicine (NASEM) Food and Nutrition Board and current member of the NASEM special emphasis panel on diet and disease relationships. Dr. Schork received a BA, MA, MS and PhD all from the University of Michigan.

Details

Wednesday, March 2, 2022, 11:00AM-noon, via Zoom

Registration

To attend, please register here via Tufts CTSI I LEARN.

 

 

 

Seminars & Workshops
FRESH & Soulful Cooking: A One-Pot Recipe with Janna Adkins

Want to cook a nutritious, soulful meal while learning about the history and cultural importance of common ingredients across the African diaspora?

The National Council of Negro Women (NCNW)-Greater Boston Section and Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy have partnered to develop FRESH& – a monthly webinar series that will explore a range of nutrition topics. FRESH& is designed to engage Black women in discussing their diet and nutrition in a culturally competent, celebratory way. Each month attendees will explore topics like how to make healthy, culturally relevant meals, boost their immune systems through diet, and coping with stress through food.

This month, we are excited to present FRESH & Soulful Cooking: A One-Pot Recipe with Janna Adkins, MS on Wednesday January 26th, 7:00PM-8:00PM EST.

Janna earned her MS in Nutrition Interventions, Communication, and Behavior Change in May 2021 and is a current doctoral student at the Friedman School. She will lead a live cooking class that reviews the history and cultural importance of common ingredients across the African diaspora. Additionally, she will share information about the nutritional content of these ingredients and how to get the most out of the food we cherish.

Attendees will be able to purchase ingredients beforehand and follow along as Janna prepares a one-pot vegetable stew.

Details

Wednesday, January 26, 2022
7;00-8:00PM
Online (a link will be sent to those who register).

Registration

To attend, please register here.

Cooking Class Flyer

 

 

Seminars & Workshops
Obtaining Informed Consent with Special Populations

Are you a clinical research team member obtaining informed consent from human research volunteers?

Could you or your team use information on best practices and strategies for obtaining informed consent from special populations?

Join Tufts CTSI for a blended synchronous/asynchronous workshop focused on providing hands-on practice consenting research participants from special populations. This training has two parts: a required, self-paced pre-work tutorial on Tufts CTSI I LEARN, and a live Zoom practice session.

In the live portion of the workshop, all participants will practice obtaining informed consent with members of Tufts CTSI’s Stakeholder Expert Panel and student actors from the Boston Arts Academy in two role-play scenarios: an adolescent research participant and an adult with temporary diminished capacity. Panel members are former research participants and individuals with experience as simulated patients. This is a learning and skill building opportunity for you, and you will not be evaluated in any way.

Participants must complete all of the pre-work on Tufts CTSI I LEARN in order to receive the Zoom link for the live training. While in the live session your active participation in the role-play activity is required. You will also learn through providing feedback to others and engaging in group discussion. This will ensure that you get the most out of what this training has to offer.

Clinical research coordinators, investigators, research fellows, research nurses, and anyone involved in obtaining informed consent are encouraged to attend.

Learning Objectives

After attending this event, participants should be able to:

  • Demonstrate professional judgement on whether a potential participant has the capacity to provide willing and uncoerced consent.
  • Distinguish between competency and capacity with respect to informed consent conversations.
  • Distinguish between assent and consent to participate in research.
  • Demonstrate (using plain language) explaining the informed consent process, in a virtual setting, to participants from special populations.

Details

Live Session: Thursday, February 3, 2022
3;00-5:00PM
Online via Zoom (a link will be sent to those who register and complete the I LEARN pre-work).

Registration

To attend, please enroll here via Tufts CTSI I LEARN by noon on February 2, 2022.

NOTE: Registration will open on Monday, January 10.

Prerequisite: CITI basic human subjects protection training. Participants will be required to upload proof of CITI completion to the Tufts CTSI I LEARN course site before the live session.

For further information, please contact Noelle Weicker, MHS.

 

 

 

Conferences & Symposia
Translational Research Day 2022

Download our presenter biographies and abstracts (PDF).

Banner displaying the title, date, and time of Translational Research Day 2022

The Impact and Promise of Learning Health Systems

Mark your calendar for Translational Research Day 2022:

Tuesday, March 15
10:00AM-4:00PM (eastern time)
Online via Zoom

Registration

Registration for Translational Research Day 2022 has closed.

Morning Keynote

The morning keynote address will be given by Michael K. Gould, MD, MS of the Kaiser Permanente Bernard J. Tyson School of Medicine.

Closing Keynote

The closing keynote address will be given by Gordon Bernard, MD of Vanderbilt University School of Medicine.

Agenda

  • 10:00-10:15AM: Welcoming remarks
    • Harry Selker, MD, MSPH
      Dean and Principal Investigator, Tufts CTSI; Executive Director, Institute for Clinical Research and Health Policy Studies (ICRHPS), Tufts Medical Center
  • 10:15-11:00AM: Keynote address
    • Michael K. Gould, MD, MS
      Director for Health Services Research and Implementation Science, Kaiser Permanente Bernard J. Tyson School of Medicine
      Research Associate Professor of Medicine, Keck School of Medicine of USC
      Senior Research Scientist, Kaiser Permanente
      Embedded Research in the Learning Healthcare Systems at Kaiser Permanente
  • 11:00-11:05AM: Break
  • 11:05AM-1:00PM: Scientific Talks
    • Alysse Wurcel, MD, MS, Tufts Medical Center
      Engaging Stakeholders to Improve Inpatient Healthcare for People Who Inject Drugs
    • Jenica Upshaw, MD, Tufts Medical Center
      Reducing Readmissions and Mortality for Patients with Heart Failure
    • Nicole H. Moraco, MD, MA, Lahey Hospital and Medical Center
      Filling the ICU Communication Gap
    • Neil Korsen, MD, MSc, Maine Medical Center
      Rob Chamberlin, MD, MBA, MaineHealth ACO
      How Do Primary Care Staff Spend Their Time? Preparing for Changes in Primary Care Reimbursement
    • Ronald Kulich, PhD, MS, Tufts School of Dental Medicine
      Development and Evaluation of an Interprofessional Controlled Substance Risk Training Program within Dentistry
  • 1:00PM-1:30PM: Lunch break
  • 1:30PM-3:00PM: Concurrent breakout sessions: Mini Research Studios
    • Session A: Addressing Tobacco Use Behavior in Young Adults with Psychosis
      David Weiss, PhD, Maine Medical Center Research Institute
    • Session B: Produce Prescriptions on Maternal and Birth Outcomes: A Food is Medicine Intervention Among Pregnant Women
      Perrie O’Tierney-Ginn, PhD, Tufts University/Tufts Medical Center
      Fang Fang Zhang, MD, PhD, Tufts University
  • 3:00-3:05PM: Break
  • 3:05-3:25PM: Closing Keynote
    • Gordon Bernard, MD
      Senior Associate Dean for Clinical Research
      Professor of Medicine
      Melinda Owen Bass Chair in Medicine
      Vanderbilt University School of Medicine
  • 3:25-4:00PM: Leading Learning Health Systems Panel Discussion

Get Social

Look for #TranslationalTufts2022 on social media and join the conversation.

 

Seminars & Workshops
Center for Quantitative Methods and Data Science Seminar 2022: Laura Corlin, PhD

Methods to Handle Mixtures of (Environmental) Exposures in Health Analyses

This seminar of the Center for Quantitative Methods and Data Science (QM&DS), in partnership with the Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Research Design (BERD) Center at Tufts CTSI and the Data-Intensive Studies Center (DISC) at Tufts University, is Wednesday, January 26, 2:00-3:00PM via Zoom. The topic is Methods to Handle Mixtures of (Environmental) Exposures in Health Analyses, presented by Laura Corlin, PhD.

Traditionally, (environmental) epidemiology has focused on individual exposure-outcome relationships; however, many (environmental) exposures co-occur. How do we identify which of these often highly-correlated exposures most affect health outcomes? Are certain combinations or mixtures important? The methods to answer these types of questions have been rapidly evolving. In this talk, Dr. Corlin will discuss several major approaches in an environmental health context.

Faculty

Laura Corlin, PhD is an Assistant Professor in Public Health and Community Medicine. She earned her MS and PhD in Environmental Health through the Tufts School of Engineering in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. She completed a post-doctoral fellowship in Cardiovascular Epidemiology at the Boston University School of Medicine. Her research focuses on developing and applying new methods to assess the health effects of environmental mixtures in observational studies. Through her exposure assessment and environmental epidemiology research, Dr. Corlin seeks to mitigate environmental health disparities. Dr. Corlin also enjoys working with students in and out of the classroom.

Details

Wednesday, January 26, 2022, 2:00-3:30PM, via Zoom

Registration

To attend, please register here via Tufts CTSI I LEARN.

 

 

 

Seminars & Workshops
Clinical Research Staff Quarterly Training: Clinical Research from a Research Administration Perspective

What is the role of the research coordinator in the clinical trials agreement and budget process? What can hold up study approval?

Tufts Medical Center (Tufts MC) and Tufts CTSI Professional Education invite you to join us on Thursday, January 27, 1:00-2:00PM for the next Clinical Research Staff Quarterly Training session. We will kick off our 2022 series with an interactive session focusing on the clinical research process from the Research Administration perspective.

You will learn how to help Research Administration develop clinical research budgets and complete the Medicare Coverage Analysis. We will walk through an overview of the Medicare Coverage Analysis process and give insight to the process of negotiating Clinical Research agreements. You will also learn how to help your Research Administrator develop budgets, track expenses, and closeout the study from a financial perspective. We will also cover how to utilize the CTMS to improve communication with Research Administration and will preview how upcoming changes in EPIC will affect the pre-registration process for clinical research studies.

Research coordinators, research managers, and anyone involved in study start-up & close-out at Tufts MC are invited to attend. This training will give you the knowledge to confidently navigate the approval process.

Featured Speakers

Olivia Lovegreen, Manager, Clinical Trials and Compliance, Research Administration

Carly Tucker, MPH, Clinical Research Compliance Specialist, Compliance Department

Swetha Chinta, MS, Research Analyst, Tufts CTSI

Learning Objectives

After attending this event, participants should be able to:

  • Identify barriers in the startup process.
  • Identify methods for improving the startup process.
  • Identify what your research administrator needs from you and/or your PI, and when.
  • Describe techniques for improving communication with the Research Administration department.

Details

Thursday, January 27, 2022
1;00-2:00PM
Online via Zoom (a link will be sent to those who register).

Registration

To attend, please enroll here via Tufts CTSI I LEARN by noon on January 27, 2022.

For further information, please email Shane Cox.

 

 

 

Forum
The Possibilities of Personalized Medicine
Medication and treatment tailored to you, based on your genes could be the future with personalized medicine.

About this event

As scientists work to understand which genes control which traits and responses, the opportunity to tailor treatment based on our genes is becoming a reality. Imagine no longer spending months or years finding the right medication and dose that works for you and your body. This could mean millions of people no longer hospitalized from adverse drug reactions each year in the US. Not to mention, effective drug discovery could cost less and happen more quickly too.

But as with any new technology not every possibility is a good one. Who might profit off of the vast amount of personal medical data needed from individuals to make this technology work? Could genetic testing could be used as a basis for discrimination? What would it mean if only rich people can afford it? And for those in ethnic groups with smaller populations or fewer people getting genetic testing, will the tests even be useful?

Join the Museum of Science and Tufts Clinical and Translational Science Institute for a panel discussion about the possibilities – both good and bad – of personalized medicine. Then stay and participate in facilitated small group discussions about this technology and what it means for you.

Details

Tuesday, November 16, 5:00-6:30PM

Online

Registration

Registration is now open!

Please sign up here.

 

Seminars & Workshops
Center for Quantitative Methods and Data Science Seminar 2021: Christine M. Ulbricht, PhD, MPH

NIH Funding Opportunities for Methodological Research in Mental Health

This seminar of the Center for Quantitative Methods and Data Science (QM&DS), in partnership with the Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Research Design (BERD) Center at Tufts CTSI and the Data-Intensive Studies Center (DISC) at Tufts University, is Wednesday, December 1, 2:00-3:30PM via Zoom. The topic is NIH Funding Opportunities for Methodological Research in Mental Health, presented by Christine M. Ulbricht, PhD, MPH.

This session will focus on opportunities for methodological research at the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). Christine Ulbricht, PhD, MPH, the Chief of the Methodological Research Program in the Services Research and Clinical Epidemiology Research Branch at NIMH, will provide an overview of the NIH and discuss NIMH’s funding priorities, programs, and mechanisms. She will discuss recent advances in statistical methods for mental health services research and funding opportunities for such research, such as NIMH-funded studies of machine learning applications to prevent suicide.

Faculty

Christine M. Ulbricht, PhD, MPH is a psychiatric epidemiologist who oversees the extramural Methodological Research Program within the Services Research and Clinical Epidemiology Research branch of the Division of Services and Intervention Research at the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). Prior to joining NIMH, she was an assistant professor at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, where her primary research interests were in applying novel statistical methods to understand heterogeneity of treatment effects, improve mental health services, and improve suicide prevention. She has served as the principal investigator of several NIH-funded studies leveraging big data to examine major depressive disorder, serious mental illness, and suicide among younger and older long-term care residents. Additionally, Dr. Ulbricht has been a co-investigator of studies on improving suicide risk identification in healthcare systems and on examining pain among older adults. She also served as associate faculty of the UMass Medical School’s Department of Psychiatry’s Implementation Science and Practice Advances Research Center and Eunice Kennedy Shriver Center and as the faculty co-director of the student chapter of the International Society of Pharmacoepidemiology

Details

Wednesday, December 1, 2:00-3:30PM, via Zoom

Registration

To attend, please register here via Tufts CTSI I LEARN.

 

 

 

Seminars & Workshops
Center for Quantitative Methods and Data Science Seminar 2021: Jean-Baptiste Poline, PhD

Tools, Methods, and Community Actions for Reproducible Neuroscience

The November seminar of the Center for Quantitative Methods and Data Science (QM&DS), in partnership with the Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Research Design (BERD) Center at Tufts CTSI and the Data-Intensive Studies Center (DISC) at Tufts University, is Wednesday, November 17, 2:00-3:30PM via Zoom. The topic is Tools, Methods, and Community Actions for Reproducible Neuroscience, presented by Jean-Baptiste Poline, PhD.

The credibility of scientific activity has recently been under scrutiny with reports questioning the reproducibility of results. In response to this “reproducibility crisis,” the National Institutes of Health (NIH) designed a plan for more reproducible science in 2015, but progress to curb the issue seems to be slow at best. It is possible that the solutions proposed by the NIH are targeting symptoms rather than causes. In this talk, Dr. Poline will first consider the field of neuroscience and human neuroimaging and analyze the main causes of irreproducibility, considering the statistical and computational aspects of neuroimaging or imaging genetics. He will then discuss the social components that are likely to contribute to irreproducibility. In a second part, Dr. Poline will review solutions to foster a more reproducible research at the level of the tools and the statistical methods used – for example in high dimensions. He will also consider the academic ecosystem and propose community actions that are both possible and could be effective to reshape the way we practice research.

Faculty

Jean-Baptiste Poline, PhD is an Associate Professor in the Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery at McGill; the co-Chair of the NeuroHub and Chair of the Technical Steering Committee for the Canadian Open Neuroscience Platform (CONP) at the Montreal Neurological Institute & Hospital (the NEURO); and a Primary Investigator at the Ludmer Centre for Neuroinformatics & Mental Health.

Details

Wednesday, November 17, 2:00-3:30PM, via Zoom

Registration

To attend, please register here via Tufts CTSI I LEARN.

 

 

 

Seminars & Workshops
Center for Quantitative Methods and Data Science Seminar 2021: Emma Pierson, PhD, MS

How can data science and machine learning be used to illuminate and reduce inequality in health care and public health?

The December seminar of the Center for Quantitative Methods and Data Science (QM&DS), in partnership with the Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Research Design (BERD) Center at Tufts CTSI and the Data-Intensive Studies Center (DISC) at Tufts University, is Wednesday, December 15, 2:00-3:30PM via Zoom. The topic is Using Machine Learning to Increase Equality in Health Care and Public Health, presented by Emma Pierson, PhD, MS.

Our society remains profoundly unequal. Worse, there is abundant evidence that algorithms can, improperly applied, exacerbate inequality in health care and other domains. This talk pursues a more optimistic counterpoint – that data science and machine learning can also be used to illuminate and reduce inequality in health care and public health – by presenting vignettes about women’s health, COVID-19, and pain.

Faculty

Emma Pierson, PhD, MS is an Assistant Professor of computer science at the Jacobs Technion-Cornell Institute at Cornell Tech and the Technion, and a computer science field member at Cornell University. She develops data science and machine learning methods to study inequality and healthcare. Her work has been recognized by a Rhodes Scholarship, Hertz Fellowship, Rising Star in EECS, MIT Technology Review 35 Innovators Under 35, and Forbes 30 Under 30 in Science. She has written for The New York Times, FiveThirtyEight, The Atlantic, The Washington Post, Wired, and various other publications.

Details

Wednesday, December 15, 2:00-3:30PM, via Zoom

Registration

To attend, please register here via Tufts CTSI I LEARN.

 

 

 

Conferences & Symposia
2021 CTSI Regional Shared Mentoring Symposium

Overview

Join us for a half-day mentoring virtual event geared towards fellows and early career faculty who are interested in exploring mentorship and career development in clinical and translational research.

The event provides networking, panel discussions, and one-to-one mentoring with senior faculty from
local clinical and translational science institutions. It is an excellent opportunity to obtain career advice from mentors and presenters.

Agenda

  • 8:30AM: Networking and introductions
  • 9:00AM: One-to-One Mentoring Sessions
  • 10:00AM: Panel discussion, Getting to K and Beyond
  • 11:00AM: Exploring Career Opportunities in Translational Science
  • 12:00PM: Closing remarks/questions

Registration

To attend, please register here.

Note: Mentees will be asked to provide an NIH formatted biosketch ahead of the mentoring session.

Details

Friday, December 10, 8:30AM-12:30PM

Online

Download a flyer (PDF).

Seminars & Workshops
Collaboration Planning for Writing a Competitive Team Science Proposal

What is a collaboration plan, and how can you use it to write a successful grant proposal and build a sustainable research team?

Evidence of a well-founded approach to scientific collaboration and research project management is increasingly required by funders and a focus of reviewer attention.

This two-part workshop, jointly offered by Tufts CTSI and Tufts University’s Office of the Vice Provost for Research, is designed to help researchers developing multi-investigator and cross-disciplinary collaborations to structure their funding proposals and set plans for a successful project start. Participants will be introduced to the comprehensive Collaborative Planning Approach developed at the NIH on the basis of research on the key factors that influence the success of a science team. Although geared to NIH applications, the workshop will draw on diverse case studies and prepare participants to apply the techniques and tools presented to craft multi-investigator proposals and build cohesive research teams in any scientific domain.

Topics covered will include:

  • Elements of a collaboration plan
  • Developing your rationale for a team approach
  • Building your team
  • Understanding collaboration readiness
  • Convergence and cross-disciplinarity in team functioning.

Featured Speakers

Amy Gantt, MA, Director of Research Development, Office of the Vice Provost for Research, Tufts University

Susan Lewis, PhD, Associate Director, Team Science & Interdisciplinary Research, Office of the Vice Provost for Research, Tufts University

Cheryl London, DVM, PhD, DACVIM, Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Education, Tufts University Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine and Director of Research Collaborations, Tufts CTSI

Anna Ponzi Dalby, ABD, Senior Research Development Specialist, Office of the Vice Provost for Research, Tufts University

Learning Objectives

After attending this event, participants should be able to:

  • Describe the elements of a collaboration plan and their intersections with writing a competitive team science proposal
  • Explain how the elements of a collaboration plan apply to building a successful and sustainable team
  • Differentiate between plans for ‘taskwork’ and ‘teamwork’
  • Identify strategies for integrating and co-producing knowledge.

Who should attend

Investigators at all levels, currently working on or hoping to develop multi-investigator research projects, as well as research staff and others responsible for supporting collaborative projects.

Time Commitment and Expectations for Attendees

Participants are expected to attend both 90-minute sessions and actively engage in breakout discussions and practice exercises.

This workshop is provided free of charge and is open to faculty and staff of Tufts University, Tufts Medical Center, and Tufts CTSI partner institutions.

Details

Thursday, January 20 and Thursday, January 27, 2022
10:00-11:30AM
Online via Zoom (a link will be sent to those who register).

Registration

To attend, please enroll here via Tufts CTSI I LEARN by January 6, 2022.

For further information, please email Hannah Santos, MBA.

 

 

 

Meeting
Dissemination and Implementation Science Special Interest Group Meeting, November 5

Interested in learning more about implementation science and dissemination and implementation strategies?

You are invited to a virtual Dissemination and Implementation Science Special Interest Group Meeting on Friday, November 5, 2021, noon-1:00PM.

In this session, Bethany Kwan, PhD, MSPH will give a talk, Pragmatic Trials and Hybrid Implementation-Effectiveness Designs in Real-World Clinical Settings.

Dr. Kwan is an Associate Professor in the Department of Family Medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, Anschutz Medical Campus. She received her PhD in social psychology from the University of Colorado Boulder in 2010, following an MSPH from the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center in 2005. She holds a BS in Chemistry and Psychology from Carnegie Mellon University (’01). As an investigator in the University of Colorado’s Adult & Child Consortium for Health Outcomes Research and Delivery Science (ACCORDS), she conducts pragmatic, patient-centered research and evaluation on health and health care in a variety of areas. With an emphasis on stakeholder engagement and dissemination and implementation (D&I) methods, her work addresses the integration of physical and behavioral health, chronic disease self-management, improving processes and systems of care to achieve the Quadruple Aim, pragmatic trials using electronic health data, and enhancing quality of life for patients and care partners. She works with patients and other stakeholders at all phases of research, from prioritization, to design, implementation, and dissemination of research. She mentors and teaches students, trainees, and fellow faculty on Designing for Dissemination to ensure that research innovations are efficiently and effectively adopted, used, and sustained in real world settings to improve health and well-being for all. Dr. Kwan directs the ACCORDS Education program as well as the Colorado Clinical & Translational Sciences Institute (CCTSI) Dissemination & Implementation Research Core.

Details

Date: Friday, November 5, noon-1:00PM

Registration

To receive the Zoom link to this event, please email Senior Project Manager Alyssa Cabrera, MPH.

Seminars & Workshops
A Conversation with The New York Times

Graphic for New York Times online event

Want to learn about the data and graphics behind The New York Times COVID-19 dashboard?

Don’t miss this live, online presentation and Q&A by Tiff Fehr, Rich Harris, Albert Sun, and Lisa Waananen Jones of The New York Times, moderated by Anna Haensch, PhD, Senior Data Scientist at the Data Intensive Studies Center (DISC) at Tufts University.

This event is co-sponsored by the Center for Quantitative Methods and Data Science (QM&DS) at Tufts Medical Center and by Tufts CTSI.

Details

Thursday, September 23, 4:00-5:30PM

Via Zoom

Registration

To attend, please register here.

Seminars & Workshops
Clinical Research Staff Quarterly Training: October 2021

The October 2021 Clinical Research Staff Quarterly Training will focus on sponsor-initiated studies.

Join us on October 21 for the next session of the Tufts Medical Center (Tufts MC) and Tufts CTSI Professional Education Clinical Research Staff Quarterly Training series.

This quarter will be all about sponsor-initiated studies: from study start-up to audits, we will cover tools, resources, tips, and best practices to help you run a successful study. These quarterly trainings are also a great way to get connected to the community of clinical research professionals at Tufts MC.

Featured Speakers

Alyssa Cabrera, MPH, Senior Project Manager, Tufts CTSI

Carly Tucker, MPH, Clinical Research Compliance Manager, Tufts Medical Center

Kimberly Garabedian, IRB Analyst, Tufts Medical Center

Vidya Iyer, MBBS, CPI, Manager, Tufts CTSI Clinical and Translational Research Center (CTRC)

Featured Topics

The Study Start-up Toolkit

This section will cover how the Study Start-up Toolkit can be used as a resource for getting clinical trials up and running. We will walk you through key sections of the toolkit and how it can support overall trial efficiency. You will walk away with a clear understanding of study start-up and your role in supporting sponsor-initiated studies during this phase.

Being Audit-Ready

Did you know there are a number of resources available to help you maintain audit readiness? The Tufts Health Sciences IRB will discuss best practices for conducting routine self-audits to keep your regulatory files in order and introduce self-auditing tools to ensure your study is always in an audit-ready state! In addition, the Tufts MC Compliance Department will also discuss their audit preparation resources.

Surviving the Sponsor Audit

In this section, we will cover a broad overview of the regulatory bodies that can audit an investigator/site. You will learn some of the major reasons for being audited and the difference between sponsor audit versus a monitoring visit. You get an in-depth review of best practices and tips that will prepare you for sponsor audits.

 

Who should attend

Clinical research staff are encouraged to attend.

Details

Thursday, October 21, 2021
1:00-2:00PM
Online via Zoom (a link will be sent to those who register).

Registration

To attend, please register here.

 

 

Seminars & Workshops
Obtaining Informed Consent: A Practical Approach

Does your work involve recruiting human research volunteers?

Join Tufts CTSI for a blended synchronous/asynchronous workshop focused on providing hands-on practice consenting simulated research participants. This two-part training includes a short online tutorial followed by a live Zoom meeting on January 31 where you will practice obtaining informed consent with community members, many of whom have been research participants themselves.  This is a learning and skill building opportunity for you and will not be evaluated in any way.

Participants must complete all of the pre-work on Tufts CTSI I LEARN in order to receive the Zoom link for the live training. While in the live workshop your active participation in the live role-play activity is required. You will also learn through providing feedback to others and engaging in group discussion. This will ensure that you get the most out of what this training has to offer.

Clinical research coordinators, investigators, research fellows, research nurses, and anyone involved in obtaining informed consent are encouraged to attend.

By the end of this workshop, participants of Parts 1 & 2 will be able to:

  • List the essential elements of informed consent.
  • Demonstrate (using plain language) in explaining the informed consent process, in a virtual setting.
  • Demonstrate multiple techniques to verify participants’ comprehension.
  • Identify 2-3 key considerations for obtaining informed consent in a remote or virtual setting.

Details

Live session via Zoom: Tuesday, January 31, 2022, 1:00PM-3:00PM EST 

Registration

To attend, please register here via Tufts CTSI I LEARN.

Prerequisite

CITI basic human subjects protection training. Participants will be required to upload proof of CITI completion to the Tufts CTSI I LEARN course site before the live session.

Conferences & Symposia
Team Science Summit: The COVID-19 Impact on Health Care

Are you interested in studying the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on health systems and the communities they serve?

Do you have an idea for a collaborative research project and want to meet like-minded clinicians and/or health policy researchers to help you formulate next steps?

Save the date for Tufts CTSI’s Fall 2021 Team Science Summit, The COVID-19 Pandemic Impact on Health Care.

The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted issues such as:

  • Health disparities
  • Equity of access
  • Telehealth
  • System preparedness and responsiveness
  • Health Care staffing
  • Health Care workforce well-being

This event will bring together researchers and clinicians from Brandeis University and Tufts CTSI partners to explore opportunities for multidisciplinary collaborations focused on examining the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on health care. The format will consist of several short talks (five-to-seven minute) followed by breakout groups to help build future collaborative research projects.

Details

Friday, September 17, 2021
2:00-3:30PM
via Zoom

Registration

Please register here.

Who should attend?

Researchers, clinicians, and students at any level who already doing research on the impact of the pandemic, have ideas for new research on the impact of the pandemic, or who are interested in learning more about the pandemic’s impact are encouraged to attend.

Agenda

2:00PM: Welcome and Opening Remarks

  • Jennifer Perloff, PhD, MPA, Brandeis University
  • Cheryl London, DVM, PhD, DACVIM, Tufts University

2:10PM: Topical Project Presentations

  • Modeling Impacts
    • Approximate Bayesian Computation for an Explicit-Duration Hidden Markov Model of COVID-19 Hospital Trajectories
      Michael Hughes, PhD, MS, Tufts University School of Engineering
    • COVID-19 ICU Outcomes by Race
      Sadeq Quraishi, MD, MHA, MMSc, Tufts Medical Center Critical Care Medicine
  • Care Innovations
    • AI-Supported Multilingual Audio for Patients of Limited English Proficiency
      Hyeon Ju Song, MS, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
    • Telehealth within Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer Programs
      Nadine Linendoll, PhD, MDiv, GNP, Tufts Medical Center Cancer Center
  • Workforce Issues and Impacts
    • PTSD related to COVID-19 and the Impacts of the Workplace
      Samantha Meeker, MPH, PhD Candidate, Northeastern University
    • Palliative Care in Nursing Homes: COVID-19 Public Health Emergency and Realistic Implications for Future Care
      Christine Bishop, PhD, Heller School for Social Policy and Management, Brandeis University
  • Vaccine Uptake
    • Community Dialogues to Build Trustworthiness and COVID Vaccine Confidence
      Jonathan Garlick, DDS, PhD, Tufts School of Dental Medicine
    • A Qualitative Study of Decisions About COVID-19 Immunizations Among Rural Mainers
      Kathleen Fairfield, MD, MPH, DrPH, Maine Medical Center

2:50PM: Parallel Sessions (Topic Discussion/Idea Generation)

  • Breakout 1: Modeling Impacts
    • Facilitator: Jennifer Perloff, PhD, MPA, Brandeis University
  • Breakout 2: Care Innovations
    • Facilitator: Daniel Weiner, MD, MS, Tufts Medical Center
  • Breakout 3: Workforce Issues
    • Facilitator: Karen Donelan, ScD, EdM, Brandeis University
  • Breakout 4: Vaccine Uptake
    • Facilitator: Cheryl London, DVM, PhD, DACVIM, Tufts University

3:30PM: Adjourn

Abstracts

Approximate Bayesian Computation for an Explicit-Duration Hidden Markov Model of COVID-19 Hospital Trajectories

Michael Hughes, PhD, MS, Tufts University School of Engineering

I’m looking to brainstorm if there are any groups that have ideas about how the model could help their research, or how we can extend the model to better capture important real phenomena. We address the problem of modeling constrained hospital resources in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic in order to inform decision-makers of future demand and assess the societal value of possible interventions. For broad applicability, we focus on the common yet challenging scenario where patient-level data for a region of interest are not available. Instead, given daily admissions counts, we model aggregated counts of observed resource use, such as the number of patients in the general ward, in the intensive care unit, or on a ventilator. In order to explain how individual patient trajectories produce these counts, we propose an aggregate count explicit-duration hidden Markov model, nicknamed the ACED-HMM, with an interpretable, compact parameterization. We develop an Approximate Bayesian Computation approach1 that draws samples from the posterior distribution over the model’s transition and duration parameters given aggregate counts from a specific location, thus adapting the model to a region or individual hospital site of interest. Samples from this posterior can then be used to produce future forecasts of any counts of interest.

 

The Association of Race with Clinical Outcomes in Patients with Coronavirus Disease 2019 Admitted to the Intensive Care Unit

Sharma E. Joseph, MD and Sadeq A. Quraishi, MD, MHA, MMSc

Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, Tufts Medical Center

The team investigated whether race is associated with length of stay (LOS), discharge destination, and in-hospital mortality in COVID-19 patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) of a single, teaching hospital that serves a racially diverse patient population. We performed a retrospective analysis of data from COVID-19 patients admitted to the ICUs at Tufts Medical Center between March 2020 and August 2020. Self-reported race was categorized as White, Black, Latinx, or Asian. Via a 500-patient analytic cohort (200 White, 100 Black, 100 Latinx, and 100 Asian), we investigated the association of race with ICU length of stay and with discharge destination (non-home vs home) and mortality. Our analysis demonstrated that there was no difference between White, Black, and Asian patients regarding ICU LOS. However, compared to White patients, Latinx patients were more likely to have a prolonged ICU LOS. We found there was no relationship between race and discharge destination, and that there was no difference in mortality between White, Black, and Latinx patients. However, Asian patients had almost 60% lower likelihood of mortality compared to White patients. Our results suggest that race may have an influence on important clinical outcomes in COVID-19 patients admitted to the ICU. Further studies are needed to determine whether biological reasons can explain these observed differences and to determine whether these risk factors could be modified to improve outcomes in critically ill COVID-19 patients.

 

AI-Supported Multilingual Audio for Patients of Limited English Proficiency

Hyeon Ju Song, MS, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

We aim to provide AI-supported multilingual audio to patients of limited English proficiency so that they can receive quality medical care. We are in the stages of testing out our research by collaborating with various care teams across the Mass General Hospital. This project aims to reduce health disparity and promote equity both during the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond.

 

Telehealth within Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer Programs

Nadine Linendoll, PhD, MDiv, GNP, Tufts Medical Center Cancer Center

The Reid R Sacco Adolescent and Young Adult Survivorship Program closed to in-person visits in early 2020 due to the Covid-19 pandemic. During the pandemic heath care providers began to worry that vulnerable cancer patients would begin to fall out of care and experience negative health outcomes.  Responding to the need to keep patients in care, the clinic began a rapid roll out of new telehealth platforms to facilitate provider-to-patient interaction in real time. The transition to telehealth occurred quickly through strategic decision-making and policy changes at both the federal and state level. Clinic staff initially identified the most vulnerable patients with known mental health concerns. Telehealth was rolled out to patients in two phases including audio only and then audio-video platforms. Telehealth services successfully kept vulnerable patients in care during the pandemic with increased flexibility to check in with patients more frequently. The clinic’s long-term goal is to integrate telehealth into standard AYA survivorship care; however, telehealth faces increasing barriers in health policy, as many of the modifications made early in the pandemic are being amended or lifted. Oncology providers are advocating for health policy legislation to extend telehealth services beyond the pandemic into routine oncologic care.

 

PTSD related to COVID-19 and the Impacts of the Workplace 

Samantha Meeker, MPH, PhD Candidate, Northeastern University

The COVID-19 pandemic’s immediate consequences have been grave; however, the severity of the long-term effects is yet unknown. Among these unknown impacts is the rate of PTSD related to COVID-19 among the general population. Rates of PTSD related to the pandemic have been shown to be high in early studies, but research around mental health and the workplace has found that workplaces can mitigate the mental health issues, like PTSD, related to a health emergency such as COVID-19. Our research aimed to examine how PTSD related to COVID-19 was impacted by workplaces. Specifically, we studied the impacts of job supports, including types of paid leave and organizational practices on PTSD. We used data from a national panel survey of working parents that measured PTSD using a modified version of the Impact of Events Scale – 6. We found that both demographics and workplace supports played a role in levels of PTSD among working parents. Our findings suggest that workplace level interventions can be effective during times of health emergencies to reduce mental health issues among staff.

 

Palliative Care in Nursing Homes: COVID-19 Public Health Emergency and Realistic Implications for Future Care

Christine E. Bishop. PhD, Heller School for Social Policy and Management, Brandeis University

Kacy Ninteau, BS, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Psychosocial Oncology and Palliative Care

Palliative care addresses physical, emotional, psychological, and spiritual suffering that accompanies serious illness. Symptom management and continuous assessment of goals of care are especially valuable for seriously ill nursing home residents, but are often far from ideal in practice. Previous research has emphasized use of outside consultants, who have often been difficult for nursing home residents to access, or dedicated internal resources, hard for resource-strapped nursing homes to provide. Our preliminary investigation of palliative care challenges stemming from the isolation imposed by the COVID-19 public health emergency (PHE) highlighted the potential for in-house delivery of palliative care. It left us with questions about the roles in facilitating or impeding effective palliative care for residents’ physicians, Medicare hospice policy and providers, and the knowledge base and task priorities of overextended nursing staff.  We are seeking partners with knowledge of nursing home palliative care to contribute to a study design using qualitative, administrative, and survey data.

 

Community Dialogues to Build Trustworthiness and COVID Vaccine Confidence

 Jonathan Garlick, DDS, PhD, Tufts School of Dental Medicine; Jennifer Allen, ScD, MPH, MSN, Melissa Barbosa, Raissa Li, Anton Schenk, Tufts University School of Arts and Sciences; Binta Barry, Maggie Fenwood Hughes, MSW, MS, Nicole Tong, Tufts CTSI

The pandemic has dramatically revealed the need for public health communication strategies that value people’s legitimate uncertainties and fears about COVID vaccination.  We are creating dialogues in Boston communities of color and immigrant communities where participants share life experiences that underly what they think and feel about COVID vaccination.  These conversations create a space to build mutual understanding as people humanize one another when considering the risks and benefits of vaccination. This talk will describe the process of building dialogues that are “from the community, for the community”, as well as highlight the tensions and challenges in doing this work.

 

A Qualitative Study of Decisions About COVID-19 Immunizations Among Rural Mainers

Kathleen Fairfield, MD, MPH, DrPH, Maine Medical Center

While New England states have been relatively successful in COVID-19 uptake of vaccines, rates remain below thresholds set by the CDC. In Maine, rates of vaccination were still only 64% of the 12+population in August 2021. Experts have emphasized an evidence-based approach—listening to the concerns of communities—to create effective policies or messages to encourage more people to be immunized. However, there is little available evidence for rural populations, especially in New England. We sought to better understand reasons for vaccine hesitancy among rural Mainers to fill this need. In collaboration with community partners, we recruited individuals to participate in semi-structured interviews about their attitudes toward, knowledge about and experience with COVID-19 vaccination, including how they receive and evaluate information related to the vaccines. Our findings are clear that there is variability in attitudes towards COVID-19vaccines among rural populations in northern New England, and these differences warrant separate strategies for accelerating vaccine uptake. Explicit messages to vaccinate are likely to backfire among individuals whose hesitancy stems from skepticism of COVID-19. Mandates may further entrench their concerns and could inspire sympathy among many of the vaccinated as well. We plan to use insights from this study to develop a targeted messaging intervention.

 

Contact

Hannah Santos, MBA
Senior Project Manager, Tufts Clinical and Translational Science Institute
Hsantos@tuftsmedicalcenter.org

Meeting
Dissemination and Implementation Science Special Interest Group Meeting, August 26

Interested in learning more about implementation science and dissemination and implementation strategies?

You are invited to a virtual Dissemination and Implementation Science Special Interest Group Meeting on Thursday, August 26, 3:00-4:00 PM.

In this session, Sara Folta, PhD will describe, from start to finish, her dissemination study: the StrongWomen – Healthy Hearts intervention. This was a community-based intervention designed to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease among midlife and older women. Dr. Folta will discuss the considerations and challenges from writing the grant proposal and deciding on a framework through to publishing the results and figuring out next steps once an intervention has reached the “end” of the translational spectrum.

Details

Date: Thursday, August 26, 3:00-4:00PM

Registration

To receive the Zoom link to this event, please email Sarah Brewer, MPH, at sbrewer@tuftsmedicalcenter.org.

Deadlines
Deadline to Apply for Junior Faculty Research Career Development Forum

Early career investigators, would you like support to:

  • Obtain research funding
  • Publish in high-impact journals
  • Translate your discoveries into better health?

This fall, Tufts CTSI will again offer the monthly Junior Faculty Research Career Development Forum. These interactive, 90-minute sessions support the biomedical research careers of junior faculty at the K or career development level.

Admission to the Forum is by application only: selected junior faculty will commit to one year of participation. Videoconferencing will be available.

Submit a biosketch, a brief letter expressing your goals for participating in the forum and your plans for upcoming grant submissions, an individual development plan (IDP), and a letter of nomination from your research or career mentor to researchcareerawards@tuftsmedicalcenter.org.

The deadline for application is Friday, August 13.

Seminars & Workshops
Pfizer Investigator Training Program (iTP) 2021

A foundational International Conference on Harmonization (ICH) Good Clinical Practices (GCP) training on Clinical Trial Management for Junior Level Investigators and Clinical Research Personnel

Tufts CTSI will host the Pfizer Investigator Training Program (ITP)-Facilitating Global Excellence in Clinical Trials.  This unique, two-day, free, live online (via videoconference), workshop is designed for junior-level clinical research personnel (e.g., junior investigators, junior clinical trial coordinators, junior IRB staff) looking to expand their skills related to the clinical trial process.  This eight-hour workshop reviews the entire trial process from planning to close-out. Attendees will gain the fundamental GCP skills required for the planning and conduct of clinical trials and the reporting of resultant data.

Details

Wednesday, September 15 and Thursday, September 16
1:00-5:00PM
via Videoconference

GCP Certificate Requirements

Completion of ITP training satisfies the Pfizer GCP requirement and TransCelerate mutual recognition criteria for conducting clinical trials.

To qualify for the GCP certificate, participants must:

  • Attend all modules in their entirety (8 hours over the course of 2 days)
  • Keep their cameras on for the entirety of the training
  • Not share computers for purposes of confirming individual attendance
  • Participate through discussion, Q&As and responding to polls

Training Modules Include:

  • The Drug Development Process
  • Study Start-up
  • Informed Consent
  • Diversity in Clinical Trials
  • Conducting a Trial
  • Study Oversight
  • Safety in Clinical Trials
  • Pediatric Drug Development
  • Regional Regulations Governing Clinical Trials
  • Pfizer Mentor Program
  • Additional content may be available

Registration

To reserve your seat, please register here via Tufts CTSI I LEARN.

Open House
Dissemination of Research Results: Virtual Open House Event

Event video (YouTube)

This event seeks to provide former study participants with an opportunity to learn about the results of the study in which they participated.

This hour-long Zoom event will include two 15-minute presentations given by investigators to former research participants from the studies being presented. The audience will also have a chance to ask questions for 15 minutes following each presentation. While former participants are the target audience, the general public, including all Wellforce employees, are invited.

Presenters

Dr. Courtney Schroeder from the Department of Hematology and Oncology at Tufts Medical Center:
A Phase 2 Trial of Infliximab in Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)

Dr. CJ Hasson from the Department of Physical Therapy at Northeastern University:
Cyberphysical Therapy for Enhanced Neuromotor Recovery in Stroke Survivors

Learning Objectives

Investigator:

  • To communicate study findings in plain language and using visual cues
  • To understand the impact that disseminating research results has on former study participants and the community at-large

Attendees will:

  • Understand the results of the trials in which they participated
  • Have a heightened awareness about research being conducted at Tufts Medical Center and/or Tufts University

Who should attend

Former research participants, Wellforce employees, and the general public.

Details

Thursday, June 24
6:00PM, via Zoom

To attend from a PC, Mac, iPad, iPhone or Android device click this URL to join:
https://wellforce.zoom.us/j/94291265014?pwd=L3BJUC9rZ2dIUDVlWXcwTWNMajIvdz09

Passcode: 628570

Or join by phone:

  • US: +1 646 876 9923, or
  • +1 301 715 8592, or
  • +1 312 626 6799, or
  • +1 408 638 0968, or
  • +1 669 900 6833, or
  • +1 253 215 8782, or
  • +1 346 248 7799

Webinar ID: 942 9126 5014

 

Seminars & Workshops
Clinical Research Staff Quarterly Training: July 2021

The July 2021 Clinical Research Staff Quarterly Training will focus on hot topics in IRB and research compliance.

Big changes are coming to IRB forms and submission processes. Join us on July 15 for the next session of the Tufts Medical Center (Tufts MC) and Tufts CTSI Professional Education Clinical Research Staff Quarterly Training series. You’ll get the inside scoop on what is new, what you will be required to do, and best practices for working with the Tufts IRB. If you are involved in study start-up activities or interact with research participants or IRB submissions, these sessions are for you! These quarterly trainings are also a great way to get connected to the community of clinical research professionals at Tufts MC.

The July session continues our focus on topics in research compliance specific to Tufts MC. Whether you are an experienced coordinator, or new to Tufts MC, there will be something here that is relevant to your work.

Featured Speakers

Christine Choy, IRB Supervisor and Database Administrator

Caitlin Farley, IRB Administrator II

Carly Tucker, Clinical Research Compliance Manager

Featured Topics

Diversity Enrollment, Biospecimen Banking, and More

The IRB office recently updated their forms and templates to reflect new processes to highlight and improve enrollment of diverse populations, their updated Biospecimen banking (formerly tissue banking) policy, and much more. You will learn about all of these changes; which forms, templates, and policies were revised, created, and eliminated; and how these changes will affect current and new studies.

Best Practices for IRB Submissions and Responding to IRB Comments

The IRB office will provide tips and guidance for a smooth and efficient IRB review of your projects. You will learn best practices for submitting studies to the Tufts IRB, responding to comments and requested revisions, and getting your study approved as quickly as possible.

Third Party Vendor Risk Assessment Update

This short update will cover the EVA page for approved research vendors including: where to find the list, how to best understand and use the approved vendors list, and other tips and tricks for this new vendor review.

Who should attend

Clinical research staff are encouraged to attend.

Details

Thursday, July 15
1:00-2:00PM
Online via Zoom (a link will be sent to those who register).

Registration

To attend, please register here.

 

 

Seminars & Workshops
Functional and Enrichment Analysis Methods for RNAseq Data

What are the three main types of functional analysis?

Functional and enrichment analyses are used to give a biological interpretation to a list of genes or proteins that may be produced from gene expression analysis. This session will introduce three main types of functional analysis and review common tools that are employed: Gene Ontology annotation and enrichment, Gene Set and Pathway enrichment, and network analysis.

This course is part of a series of trainings in biomedical data science offered by the Center for Quantitative Methods and Data Science, Tufts CTSI, and Tufts University Data Intensive Studies Center. For the full list of trainings in this series, please visit the Center for Quantitative Methods and Data Science webpage.

Faculty

This workshop will be taught by Rebecca Batorsky, PhD, Eric Reed, PhD, and Albert Tai, PhD.

Rebecca Batorsky is a Senior Bioinformatics Scientist in Research Technology, part of Tufts Technology Services and a DISC fellow. She earned her PhD in Physics in 2012 from Tufts University, where she focused on mathematical and computational modeling of virus evolution. Before becoming staff at Tufts, she worked as a bioinformatics software developer at a clinical genomics start-up company. Dr. Batorsky works to enable researchers to answer biological questions with data-driven methods, such as analysis of high-throughput DNA and RNA sequencing data. She is especially interested in developing methods to use multiple `omics technologies to give insight into biological pathways and processes.

Eric Reed is a Data Scientist in the Data Intensive Studies Center (DISC) at Tufts University. He earned an MS in Biostatistics from the University of Massachusetts Amherst in 2015 and a PhD in Bioinformatics from Boston University in 2020. Dr. Reed’s research is focused on working with biomedical researchers to implement cutting-edge high-throughput profiling techniques and develop analytical approaches to better interrogate the biological questions at hand. His dissertation work encompassed advancement of large-scale transcriptomic profiling for toxicogenomic screening. This included the benchmarking scalable library preparation techniques and development of machine learning methods and software. Through numerous collaborative projects, Dr. Reed’s work has led to contributions to various biomedical fields including environmental health, metabolic diseases, oral cancer, breast cancer, Huntington’s disease, and addiction.

Albert Tai is a Research Assistant Professor of Immunology at Tufts University. His research work focuses on providing current research technology to basic research community within and outside of the University, including next generation sequencing (NGS), high throughout screen (HTS), high content screen (HGS), robotics automation and flow cytometry. These technologies, especially NGS and HCS, generates significant amount of data and require specialized analytical approaches. A part of his research centers on creating or optimizing these analytical approaches, via utilizing existing software/pipeline and/or developing new ones. Furthermore, research projects that utilize multiple technologies, or multi-omics, are becoming more popular, a mean to allow association and visualization of multi-omics data is also of interest.

Who should attend

Basic statistical knowledge is required. Computational experience will be helpful, but is not required.

Details

Wednesday, July 28
2:00-3:30PM
Online (a link will be sent to those who register).

Registration

To attend, please register here.

You may also register for the other trainings in this series:

 

 

Seminars & Workshops
Bioinformatics Analysis of Single-Cell RNA Sequencing Data

What are methods for performing common workflows on scRNAseq data to characterize sub-populations of cell profiles?

Single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNA-seq) allows for transcriptome-wide profiling of individual cells present in a tissue sample. While conceptually similar, scRNSeq and “bulk” RNAseq projects differ so greatly in their overall study design, goals, and statistical caveats that their analytical investigation is distinct. In this session, we will introduce methods for performing common workflows on scRNAseq data to characterize sub-populations of cell profiles, including: data preprocessing and normalization, dimensionality reduction, clustering, and visualization.

This course is part of a series of trainings in biomedical data science offered by the Center for Quantitative Methods and Data Science, Tufts CTSI, and Tufts University Data Intensive Studies Center. For the full list of trainings in this series, please visit the Center for Quantitative Methods and Data Science webpage.

Faculty

This workshop will be taught by Tanya Karagiannis, MS and Eric Reed, PhD.

Tanya Karagiannis is a Research Assistant at Tufts Medical Center in the Institute for Clinical Research and Health Policy Studies working with Dr. Paola Sebastiani. She has an MS in Bioinformatics from Boston University where she is also continuing her PhD in Bioinformatics under the advisement of Dr. Paola Sebastiani and Dr. Stefano Monti. Her research focus is in the application and development of single cell transcriptomic methods utilizing machine learning and Bayesian statistics, with interest in multi-omics as well.

Eric Reed is a Data Scientist in the Data Intensive Studies Center (DISC) at Tufts University. He earned an MS in Biostatistics from the University of Massachusetts Amherst in 2015 and a PhD in Bioinformatics from Boston University in 2020. Dr. Reed’s research is focused on working with biomedical researchers to implement cutting-edge high-throughput profiling techniques and develop analytical approaches to better interrogate the biological questions at hand. His dissertation work encompassed advancement of large-scale transcriptomic profiling for toxicogenomic screening. This included the benchmarking scalable library preparation techniques and development of machine learning methods and software. Through numerous collaborative projects, Dr. Reed’s work has led to contributions to various biomedical fields including environmental health, metabolic diseases, oral cancer, breast cancer, Huntington’s disease, and addiction.

Who should attend

Basic statistical knowledge is required. Computational experience will be helpful, but is not required.

Details

Wednesday, July 21
2:00-3:30PM
Online (a link will be sent to those who register).

Registration

To attend, please register here.

You may also register for the other trainings in this series:

 

 

Seminars & Workshops
Bioinformatics Analysis of Bulk RNA Sequencing Data

Which tools for experimental analysis should you choose?

High throughout RNA sequencing allows genome-wide investigation of gene expression and regulation. However, designing an experiment and choosing the right tools for analysis can be challenging. This session will introduce methods for analyzing and visualizing RNA-seq data: quality control, alignment-based quantification, transcriptome assembly and differential expression analysis.

This course is part of a series of trainings in biomedical data science offered by the Center for Quantitative Methods and Data Science, Tufts CTSI, and Tufts University Data Intensive Studies Center. For the full list of trainings in this series, please visit the Center for Quantitative Methods and Data Science webpage.

Faculty

This workshop will be taught by  Rebecca Batorsky, PhD and Albert Tai, PhD.

Rebecca Batorsky is a Senior Bioinformatics Scientist in Research Technology, part of Tufts Technology Services and a DISC fellow. She earned her PhD in Physics in 2012 from Tufts University, where she focused on mathematical and computational modeling of virus evolution. Before becoming staff at Tufts, she worked as a bioinformatics software developer at a clinical genomics start-up company. Dr. Batorsky works to enable researchers to answer biological questions with data-driven methods, such as analysis of high-throughput DNA and RNA sequencing data. She is especially interested in developing methods to use multiple `omics technologies to give insight into biological pathways and processes.

Albert Tai is a Research Assistant Professor of Immunology at Tufts University. His research work focuses on providing current research technology to basic research community within and outside of the University, including next generation sequencing (NGS), high throughout screen (HTS), high content screen (HGS), robotics automation and flow cytometry. These technologies, especially NGS and HCS, generates significant amount of data and require specialized analytical approaches. A part of his research centers on creating or optimizing these analytical approaches, via utilizing existing software/pipeline and/or developing new ones. Furthermore, research projects that utilize multiple technologies, or multi-omics, are becoming more popular, a mean to allow association and visualization of multi-omics data is also of interest.

Who should attend

Basic statistical knowledge is required. Computational experience will be helpful, but is not required.

Details

Wednesday, July 14
2:00-3:30PM
Online (a link will be sent to those who register).

Registration

To attend, please register here.

You may also register for the other trainings in this series:

 

 

Seminars & Workshops
Introduction to Sequence-Based Transcriptomic Analysis

When should you use sample enrichment, sequencing format, and library preparation approaches?

RNA-Seq is a powerful technology that can be used to study transcription profile in sample of interest. Yet, the choice of sample enrichment, sequencing format, and library preparation approach all have profound impact on the usability of sequencing data for downstream intended (and intended) analysis. Thus, the parameters are important consideration when designing your own experiment, as well as utilizing data that is available in the public domain. This session aims to provide some guidance on these topics.

This course is part of a series of trainings in biomedical data science offered by the Center for Quantitative Methods and Data Science, Tufts CTSI, and Tufts University Data Intensive Studies Center. For the full list of trainings in this series, please visit the Center for Quantitative Methods and Data Science webpage.

Faculty

This workshop will be taught by Eric Reed, PhD and Albert Tai, PhD.

Eric Reed is a Data Scientist at Tufts University. He earned an MS in Biostatistics from the University of Massachusetts Amherst in 2015 and a PhD in Bioinformatics from Boston University in 2020. Eric’s research is focused on working with biomedical researchers to implement cutting-edge high-throughput profiling techniques and develop analytical approaches to better interrogate the biological questions at hand. His dissertation work encompassed advancement of large-scale transcriptomic profiling for toxicogenomic screening. This included the benchmarking scalable library preparation techniques and development of machine learning methods and software. Through numerous collaborative projects, Eric’s work has led to contributions to various biomedical fields including environmental health, metabolic diseases, oral cancer, breast cancer, Huntington’s disease, and addiction.

Albert Tai is a Research Assistant Professor of Immunology at Tufts University. His research work focuses on providing current research technology to basic research community within and outside of the University, including next generation sequencing (NGS), high throughout screen (HTS), high content screen (HGS), robotics automation and flow cytometry. These technologies, especially NGS and HCS, generates significant amount of data and require specialized analytical approaches. A part of his research centers on creating or optimizing these analytical approaches, via utilizing existing software/pipeline and/or developing new ones. Furthermore, research projects that utilize multiple technologies, or multi-omics, are becoming more popular, a mean to allow association and visualization of multi-omics data is also of interest.

Who should attend

Basic statistical knowledge is required. Computational experience will be helpful, but is not required.

Details

Wednesday, June 30
2:00-3:30PM
Online (a link will be sent to those who register).

Registration

To attend, please register here.

You may also register for the other trainings in this series:

 

 

Seminars & Workshops
Study Design for Biomedical Data Science

What are the appropriate analytical techniques for study designs and what measures of association, advantages and disadvantages should be used?

This seminar will provide an introduction to epidemiologic study design, including cross-sectional, cohort, and case-control studies. It will review the appropriate analytical techniques for each design along with their measures of association, advantages and disadvantages, and the types of biases that can be present with each. Examples from the literature will be provided to illustrate concepts and common pitfalls that may occur when analyzing data from observational studies.

This course is part of a series of trainings in biomedical data science offered by the Center for Quantitative Methods and Data Science, Tufts CTSI, and Tufts University Data Intensive Studies Center. For the full list of trainings in this series, please visit the Center for Quantitative Methods and Data Science webpage.

Basic statistical knowledge is required. Computational experience will be helpful, but is not required.

Faculty

This workshop will be taught by Janis Breeze, MPH and Angie Rodday, PhD, MS

Janis Breeze is an Epidemiologist, Assistant Professor of Medicine, and Associate Director of the Biostatistics, Epidemiology, and Research Design (BERD) Center at Tufts CTSI. She has many years’ experience helping researchers in the design of observational and experimental studies, particularly in the areas of newborn medicine, obstetrics and gynecology, pulmonary medicine, and surgery.

Angie Rodday is a Biostatistician, Assistant Professor of Medicine, and Associate Director of the Clinical and Translational Science (CTS) Graduate Program at the Tufts University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences. She has experience as a principal investigator of her own work, as well as experience as a Co-Investigator on others’ projects. Dr. Rodday teaches biostatistics courses as part of the CTS Graduate Program.

Who should attend

Basic statistical knowledge is required. Computational experience will be helpful, but is not required.

Details

Wednesday, June 23
2:00-3:30PM
Online (a link will be sent to those who register).

Registration

To attend, please register here.

You may also register for the other trainings in this series:

 

 

Seminars & Workshops
Center for Quantitative Methods and Data Science Seminar 2021: Michael Wojnowicz, PhD

Want a framework for flexible joint Bayesian modeling of multiple time series where inference is fast, easy, and scalable?

The second June seminar of the Center for Quantitative Methods and Data Science (QM&DS), in partnership with the Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Research Design (BERD) Center at Tufts CTSI and the Data-Intensive Studies Center (DISC) at Tufts University, is Wednesday, June 16, 2:00-3:00PM via Zoom. The topic is Scalable Bayesian Flexible Joint Time Series Modeling, presented by Michael Wojnowicz, PhD.

We frequently obtain datasets containing multiple time series — that is, a collection of sequences, often corresponding to temporal data from multiple individuals. For example, consider movement patterns of soldiers during a ruck march, lesion counts of multiple sclerosis patients, or computer activity by employees at a company. In this talk, we describe a framework for flexible joint Bayesian modeling of multiple time series where inference is fast, easy, and scalable. In particular, we construct a scalable Bayesian approach to mixed HMMs, where mixed HMMs are Hidden Markov Models with multi-level generalized linear models (a.k.a. Generalized Linear Mixed Models, or Mixed Effects Models) embedded within the transitions and emissions structure. Mixed HMMs are an excellent framework for personalized time series modeling: models can be personalized, while sharing statistical strength across individuals to “fill in” knowledge as necessary, based on knowledge about other individuals, and particularly similar individuals. Moreover, the impact of dynamic covariates can be learned based on their effects across the entire population of individuals. In this talk, we will introduce mixed HMMs, and then discuss how to make inference fast, easy, and scalable.

Faculty

Michael Wojnowicz, PhD is a Data Scientist II in the Data Intensive Studies Center (DISC) at Tufts University, working with the Machine Learning Research Group. He earned his Ph.D. from Cornell University in 2012, where his work in Cognitive Science led to the Dallenbach Fellowship for Research Excellence, the Cognitive Science Dissertation Proposal Award, and the Cognitive Science Graduate Research Award. Dr. Wojnowicz also has master’s degrees in Mathematics (University of Washington) and Statistics (University of California at Irvine). Before joining Tufts University, Dr. Wojnowicz was the Distinguished Data Scientist at Cylance. At Cylance, he developed statistical machine learning models for detecting malicious computer files and anomalous user activity, leading to 10 patents (5 granted, 5 pending). Dr. Wojnowicz’ current research interests include time series modeling, variational inference, and nonparametric Bayesian modeling.

Details

Wednesday, June 16, 2:00-3:00PM, via Zoom

Registration

To attend, please register here via Tufts CTSI I LEARN.

 

 

 

Seminars & Workshops
Including Non-English-Speaking Participants in Research

Are you a clinical research team member obtaining informed consent from human research volunteers?

Could you or your team use information on best practices and strategies for working with interpreters?

Join Tufts CTSI’s Stakeholder and Community Engagement Program’s quarterly training focused on Including Non-English-Speaking Participants in Research. This is a blended synchronous/asynchronous workshop that includes completion of a required, self-paced tutorial on Tufts CTSI I LEARN followed by an interactive live session hosted on Zoom. The live session will provide an opportunity to practice working with professional interpreters to obtain informed consent with non-English-speaking members of Tufts CTSI’s Stakeholder Expert Panel. Panel members are former research participants and individuals with experience as simulated patients. This is a learning and skill-building opportunity for you and will not be evaluated in any way.

Participants must complete the online pre-work in order to receive the Zoom link for the live training. While in the live session, your active participation is required, including participating in the roleplay, providing feedback to others, and engaging in group discussion. This will ensure that you get the most out of what this training has to offer.

By the end of this training, you should be able to:

  • Identify when a participant needs an interpreter in order to obtain informed consent.
  • Demonstrate the correct procedure for using an interpreter to obtain informed consent.
  • Demonstrate three communication techniques to use while obtaining informed consent with an interpreter.

Faculty

This training will be taught by Robert Sege, MD, PhD, Tufts CTSI Lead Navigator and Co-Director of Stakeholder and Community Engagement.

Who should attend

Clinical research coordinators, investigators, research fellows, research nurses, and anyone involved in obtaining informed consent are encouraged to attend.

Details

Thursday, June 10
9:00-11:00AM
Online via Zoom (a link will be sent to those who register).

*Pre-work via Tufts CTSI I LEARN must be completed prior to the training.

Registration

To attend, please register here.

 

 

Seminars & Workshops
Including Non-English-Speaking Participants in Research

Are you a clinical research team member obtaining informed consent from human research volunteers?

Could you or your team use information on best practices and strategies for working with interpreters?

Join Tufts CTSI’s Stakeholder and Community Engagement Program’s quarterly training focused on Including Non-English-Speaking Participants in Research. This is a blended synchronous/asynchronous workshop that includes completion of a required, self-paced tutorial on Tufts CTSI I LEARN followed by an interactive live session hosted on Zoom. The live session will provide an opportunity to practice working with professional interpreters to obtain informed consent with non-English-speaking members of Tufts CTSI’s Stakeholder Expert Panel. Panel members are former research participants and individuals with experience as simulated patients. This is a learning and skill-building opportunity for you and will not be evaluated in any way.

Participants must complete the online pre-work in order to receive the Zoom link for the live training. While in the live session, your active participation is required, including participating in the roleplay, providing feedback to others, and engaging in group discussion. This will ensure that you get the most out of what this training has to offer.

By the end of this training, you should be able to:

  • Identify when a participant needs an interpreter in order to obtain informed consent.
  • Demonstrate the correct procedure for using an interpreter to obtain informed consent.
  • Demonstrate three communication techniques to use while obtaining informed consent with an interpreter.

Faculty

This training will be taught by Robert Sege, MD, PhD, Tufts CTSI Lead Navigator and Co-Director of Stakeholder and Community Engagement.

Who should attend

Clinical research coordinators, investigators, research fellows, research nurses, and anyone involved in obtaining informed consent are encouraged to attend.

Details

Tuesday, June 8
1:30-3:30PM
Online via Zoom (a link will be sent to those who register).

*Pre-work via Tufts CTSI I LEARN must be completed prior to the training.

Registration

To attend, please register here.

 

 

Seminars & Workshops
Community-Engaged Research in Boston Chinatown

Authentic partnerships for relevant, actionable research

This 90-minute live training will give academic researchers interested in doing engaged research in the Chinatown neighborhood of Boston a basic grounding in authentic and relevant best practices for engaging in this type of work with community partners. The topics to be covered are the benefits and challenges in this research and how to build trusting, authentic relationships with community partners. Through this training, participants will hear some of the voices from the community, and be given time to reflect on your role in and perspective on community engaged research and how to make it action-oriented and relevant in today’s world.

By the end of this training, you should be able to:

  • Define community engaged research as has been practiced in Boston Chinatown.
  • Describe methods for building trust with community partners and research participants.
  • List qualities required for successful community engaged research practice
  • Provide a case study of problem gambling as an example of how community engaged research can be mutually beneficial for researchers and community members.

Faculty

This training will be taught by Carolyn Rubin, EdD, MA, Director of Addressing Disparities in Asian Populations through Translational Research (ADAPT).

Who should attend

Investigators, research study team members, and graduate students are encouraged to attend.

Details

Thursday, June 3
10:00-11:30AM
Online (a link will be sent to those who register).

Registration

To attend, please register here.

 

 

Seminars & Workshops
Mentor Training for Graduate Students

Want to be a more effective research mentee?

In Spring 2021, Tufts CTSI will offer a new, special Mentor Training session for graduate students in the Tufts University School of Medicine and Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences MD/PhD and Clinical and Translational Science (CTS) programs.

In addition to exploring concepts of mentoring, this special session will focus on how to have an effective mentor relationship, resiliency, and how to receive constructive feedback.

Details

Monday May 10, 1:00-3:00PM EDT, via Zoom

Submit your application for Graduate Student Mentor Training by April 30, 2021.

 

 

 

Seminars & Workshops
Mentor Training for Junior and Senior Faculty

Want to be a more effective research mentor?

Join us in May 2021 for one of two case-based training opportunities for faculty members with mentees preparing for research careers in biomedical, behavioral, clinical, and social sciences.

If you are responsible for mentoring Tufts CTSI’s graduate education program’s fellows (TL1) and scholars (KL2), this is a great opportunity to complete the mentor training recommended every other year.

Meet peers and faculty members with expertise in mentoring and career development, and advance your skills in:

  • Goal-setting and alignment
  • Feedback (giving and receiving)
  • Diversity and unconscious bias
  • Relational boundaries
  • Team science.

Requirements for the training:

  • Complete online pre-work (approximately 1-2 hours) on the Tufts CTSI I LEARN platform prior to attending the live session.
  • Participate actively during the live session (2 hours) and share mentoring experiences.
  • Answer follow-up surveys about the outcomes and impact of this training on your mentees.

After completing one of these sessions, you should be able to:

  • Describe the difference between advising and mentoring.
  • Explain the importance of communication in the mentor/mentee relationship.
  • Discuss common mentoring challenges and possible solutions.
  • Identify mentoring tools and resources that you can use with your mentees.

Details

Monday May 24, 1:00-3:00PM EDT, via Zoom

Admission to mentor training is by application and is open to faculty across our partner network.

Submit your application for Faculty Mentor Training by May 12, 2021.

 

 

 

Seminars & Workshops
Mentor Training for Junior and Senior Faculty

Want to be a more effective research mentor?

Join us in May 2021 for one of two case-based training opportunities for faculty members with mentees preparing for research careers in biomedical, behavioral, clinical, and social sciences.

If you are responsible for mentoring Tufts CTSI’s graduate education program’s fellows (TL1) and scholars (KL2), this is a great opportunity to complete the mentor training recommended every other year.

Meet peers and faculty members with expertise in mentoring and career development, and advance your skills in:

  • Goal-setting and alignment
  • Feedback (giving and receiving)
  • Diversity and unconscious bias
  • Relational boundaries
  • Team science.

Requirements for the training:

  • Complete online pre-work (approximately 1-2 hours) on the Tufts CTSI I LEARN platform prior to attending the live session.
  • Participate actively during the live session (2 hours) and share mentoring experiences.
  • Answer follow-up surveys about the outcomes and impact of this training on your mentees.

After completing one of these sessions, you should be able to:

  • Describe the difference between advising and mentoring.
  • Explain the importance of communication in the mentor/mentee relationship.
  • Discuss common mentoring challenges and possible solutions.
  • Identify mentoring tools and resources that you can use with your mentees.

Details

Monday May 17, 1:00-3:00PM EDT, via Zoom

Admission to mentor training is by application and is open to faculty across our partner network.

Submit your application for Faculty Mentor Training by May 12, 2021.

 

 

 

Forum
Feeding Communities: Big Challenges, Local Actions

Have you ever wondered how decisions are made about our food system and how you can get involved to support your community?

Join Tufts CTSI and the Museum of Science, Boston to learn about the current challenges in our food system, how food polices are determined, and how you can take part to contribute to a solution. Hear from a panel of experts as they discuss questions such as:

  • What are the biggest barriers to a just food system?
  • What information do policymakers need to make decisions around food justice?
  • How can individuals influence policy change?

After hearing from our panelists, participants can join small group conversations to share their concerns, listen to concerns of others, and discuss what they hope to work on in the future to help feed communities.

Moderator

Laura Reiley, Business of Food Reporter at the Washington Post

Panelists

Jen Faigel, Executive Director and Co-Founder of CommonWealth Kitchen

Greg Watson, Director of Policy and Systems Design at the Schumacher Center for a New Economics

Norbert L. W. Wilson, Professor of Food, Economics, and Community at Duke Divinity School

Details

Wednesday, April 28, 5:00-7:00PM

Online

Registration

Registration is now open!

Please sign up here.

 

Conferences & Symposia
23rd Annual Clinical and Translational Science Graduate Program Symposium

Zoom link for the Clinical and Translational Science Graduate Program Symposium

Overview

The 23rd Annual Clinical and Translational Science (CTS) Graduate Program Symposium will be Friday, May 7, 9:00AM-1:00PM , via Zoom.

This year’s keynote speaker is Robert W. Yeh, MD, MSc, MBA, Director of the Richard A. and Susan F. Smith Center for Outcomes Research in Cardiology at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, and Associate Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Yeh will present Precision, Pragmatism and Parachutes: Modernizing Empiricism in Cardiovascular Care at the Tufts Medical Center Grand Rounds at noon.

The event will also feature presentations and posters by students enrolled in the CTS Graduate Program.

Schedule of Events

  • 9:00AM: Welcome remarks
    • David Kent, MD, MSc
  • 9:15AM-10:45AM: Presentations by MS and PhD graduates
    • 9:15AM: Evangelos Papathanasiou, DDS, MS, PhD, MS
      Specialized Pro-resolving Mediators (SPMs) and Scar Tissue Formation after Cleft Lip Surgical Repair
    • 9:30AM: Margaret M. Byrne, MD, MS
      Immune-related Adverse Events in Cancer Patients Being Treated with Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors
    • 9:45AM: Erin Flanagin, MD, MS
      Muscle-related Determinants of Serum Filtration Marker Levels and Their Association with GFR Estimating Equation Performance in Older Adults
    • 10:00AM: Shawana Bibi, MD, MS
      Clinical and Demographic Predictors of the Need for Pharmacotherapy in Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS)
    • 10:15AM: Heather Grant, MD, MS
      Racial and Ethnic Disparities in the Surgical Management and Outcomes of Colorectal Cancer in the Non-Elective Setting
    • 10:30AM: Alexandra Sack, DVM, PhD
      A One Health Approach to Zoonotic Parasitic and Vector Borne Diseases: Evaluating Anthropogenic, Environmental, and Spatial Risk Factors
  • 10:45AM-11:00AM: Instructions for Poster Sessions and break
  • 11:00AM-11:30AM: Poster sessions moderated by Joshua Cohen, PhD and Robert Sege, MD, PhD
    • Posters by first-year Masters students:
      • Dara Azuma, MD
        Hunger Signaling Gene Expression in Infants of Diabetic Mothers and Their Association with Body Composition and Energy Homeostasis Regulators
      • Charles Cummings, DVM
        Snakebite Envenoming in Avian Species: A Proposal for Clinical Practice Guidelines in Zoological Medicine
      • Haidong Feng, MPH, MS
        Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Tai Chi Versus Physical Therapy for Knee Osteoarthritis
      • Caroline Hsu, MD
        COVID-19 in Home Dialysis Patients: Epidemiology and Outcomes as Compared to In-Center Dialysis Patients
      • Natalie Pawlak, BS
        Excess Mortality and Risk Factor Distribution Among COVID-19 Deaths: A Study In Zambia
      • Jessica Penney, MD
        Increased Burden of SARS-CoV-2 Infection Among Patients with a Severe Psychiatric Diagnosis. A Single Center Cohort Analysis
      • Emma Price, VMD
        Factors Associated with Antimicrobial Prescription in Dogs and Cats at a Tertiary Veterinary Hospital
    • Posters by PhD students:
      • Zahna Bigham, BA
        The Impact of Hypertensive Diseases of Pregnancy on the Incidence of Breast Cancer in Black Women
      • Jonathan Brown, BS
        Discordant Grading of Aortic Stenosis Severity with the Use of Echocardiographic Metrics
      • Anita Kumar, MD
        Patient and Disease Factors Predict Risk of One-Year Mortality Among Older Adults Who Receive Intensive Chemotherapy for Hodgkin Lymphoma (HL)
    • Posters by Certificate students:
      • David Lee, MD
        The Impact Of Cirrhosis Of Postprocedural Outcomes Of Patients Undergoing Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement (SAVR) And Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR): Update From 2011-2017 US Hospital Data
      • Maria Rodriguez-Berrios, ND
        Association of Acculturation, Community Identity, and Discrimination with Adherence to Colorectal Cancer Screening
  • 11:30AM: Closing remarks
    • David Kent, MD, MSc and Angie Rodday, PhD, MS
  • 11:45AM: Break
  • 12:00PM: Grand Rounds
    • Robert W. Yeh, MD, MSc, MBA

Registration

To receive the Zoom link, please email info@tuftsctsi.org.

Seminars & Workshops
Clinical Research Staff Quarterly Training: May 2021

The May Clinical Research Staff Quarterly Training will focus on hot topics in research compliance.

Tufts Medical Center and Tufts CTSI Professional Education are excited to announce the re-launch of the Clinical Research Staff Quarterly Training series. The first training in the new series will focus on topics in research compliance specific to Tufts Medical Center.

Featured Topics

Clinical Research Pre-Registration

The Clinical Research Pre-Registration (Pre-Reg) form is used for patients coming into the hospital for inpatient or outpatient study visits that are scheduled for ancillary care. You will learn how to complete a Clinical Research Pre-Registration form and the importance of this information as it relates to research billing compliance.

Greenphire Clincard

Greenphire Clincard system is the preferred method for providing compensation or reimbursement to subjects in clinical research studies. We will discuss how to get studies added to Clincard, why the system is the most compliant way to pay research subjects, FAQs around using the system and important things to consider when requesting an alternative method.

Research Third Party Vendor Onboarding and Risk Assessment

Wellforce has recently rolled out a new Third Party Risk Management (TPRM) process including a new TPRM Vendor Onboarding Form. We will discuss when this form should be completed as part of study start-up and how to best complete it as it relates to research.

Who should attend

Clinical research staff are encouraged to attend.

Details

Friday, May 7
1:00-2:00PM
Online via Zoom (a link will be sent to those who register).

Registration

To attend, please register here.

 

 

Seminars & Workshops
A Conversation about COVID-19 and Mental Wellness

View the video from this event.

How can the role of women and parents facilitate emotional healing during the COVID-19 pandemic?

Join the Greater Boston Section of the National Council of Negro Women and Tufts CTSI for an interactive, virtual (Zoom) discussion with Marsha Jackson, LICSW.

Marsha Jackson has vast experience providing clinical and therapeutic services for families, children, adolescents, and adults, including 20 years of supervising social workers who conduct case management in the Child Welfare System. She will talk about:

  • The role of women as a core to facilitate healing
  • Behavioral indicators of children and family who are struggling
  • How to maintain emotional wellness
  • Usage of Telehealth/Telemedicine to connect with providers
  • Other resources

Who should attend

All are welcome to attend.

Details

Tuesday, April 6
7:00-8:00PM
Online via Zoom (a link will be sent to those who register).

Registration

To attend, please register here.

 

 

Seminars & Workshops
Center for Quantitative Methods and Data Science Seminar 2021: Sara Lodi, PhD, MS

What is the long-term effect of direct antiviral agents for Hepatitis C?

The first June seminar of the Center for Quantitative Methods and Data Science (QM&DS), in partnership with the Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Research Design (BERD) Center at Tufts CTSI and the Data-Intensive Studies Center (DISC) at Tufts University, is Wednesday, June 9, 2:00-3:00PM via Zoom. The topic of this month’s webinar is What is the Long-term Effect of Direct Antiviral Agents for Hepatitis C? A Causal Inference Approach Using ‘Big Data,’ presented by Sara Lodi, PhD.

The advent of direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs) in 2011 revolutionized hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment: based on clinical trials and real world data, approximately 95% of patients treated with DAA achieved a sustained virological response equivalent to cure. However, even after cure is achieved, the risk of hepatic and extra-hepatic disease remains. Our understanding of post-DAA clinical outcomes is based on clinical trials with relatively short follow-up and selected participants. However, the extent to which DAA impacts extra-hepatic morbidity in the long-term and in heterogenous populations is unknown. Electronic health records collected in routine clinical practice provide a unique opportunity to estimate the long-term benefits of DAA treatment and to assess the need for post-DAA clinical management.

In this talk, Dr. Sara Lodi will discuss how to design an observational study to estimate the effect of DAA on kidney function using the target trial approach. She will also describe how to apply and interpret the results of the parametric g-formula, a causal inference method that provides consistent estimates in the presence of treatment-confounding feedback. Dr. Lodi will present preliminary results using electronic health records from Boston Medical Center and the HepCAUSAL collaboration.

 

Faculty

Sara Lodi, PhD is an Assistant Professor in Biostatistics at Boston University School of Public Health. She obtained her PhD in Medical Statistics at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine in 2009. Her research focuses on clinical trials, clinical epidemiology and comparative effectiveness research using routinely collected heath data, particularly in the area of infectious disease and substance use. Methodologically, she focuses on statistical techniques for causal inference to estimate effects of interventions along the HIV continuum of care. She has published many articles on behalf of large international collaborations of HIV cohorts such as CASCADE, COHERE, URBAN ARCH and the HIV-CAUSAL Collaboration.

Details

Wednesday, June 9, 2:00-3:00PM, via Zoom

Registration

To attend, please register here via Tufts CTSI I LEARN.

 

 

 

Seminars & Workshops
Conflict in Research Teams: Prevention, Management, and Resolution

Would you like to learn how to manage conflict as a member or leader of a team-based research project?

In collaborative research, conflict is inevitable. As individuals with diverse perspectives, backgrounds, and personalities undergo the stages of team formation, differences in goals, working styles, and expectations emerge. Failing to address these differences can derail a promising research idea and fracture collaborative relationships.

Learn the strategies to anticipate and overcome conflict in your research from a Team Science methodology in Conflict in Research Teams: Prevention, Management, and Resolution. In this two-session, live online workshop, you’ll hear about common areas of conflict in research teams, learn about frameworks for understanding, discussing, and managing conflict, and practice these skills through role-playing.

Learning objectives

After attending this event, participants should be able to:

  • Assess the state of conflict in their own teams.
  • Describe how a high-functioning team manages conflict effectively.
  • Employ tools and practices to anticipate and resolve common areas of conflict in research teams.

Who should attend

Faculty and research team members who currently work on team-based research projects, or plan to do so in the future, are encouraged to attend.

Details

Monday, April 26 and Monday, May 3, 2021
2:00-4:00PM
Online via Zoom (a link will be sent to those who register).

Registration

To attend, please enroll here via Tufts CTSI I LEARN by April 25.

*If you have not already registered for Tufts CTSI I LEARN, you will be asked to create an account, which can be used to register for all future Tufts CTSI sponsored workshops, courses, and events. If you are not sure whether you have an account, please email training@tuftsctsi.org.

 

Conferences & Symposia
Translational Research Day 2021

Download a handout of our presenter biographies and abstracts (PDF).

Translational Research Across the Spectrum

Interested in learning about how research that spans translational phases leads to discoveries like the COVID-19 vaccines? Mark your calendar for Translational Research Day 2021:

Tuesday, April 27
9:00AM-3:00PM
Online via Zoom

Registration

Please register here to attend.

Keynote

The keynote address will be given by John R. Mascola, MD, Director of the Dale and Betty Bumpers Vaccine Research Center (VRC) at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), National Institutes of Health (NIH). Dr. Mascola will highlight the scientific discoveries that laid the foundation for rapid COVID-19 vaccine development.

Agenda

  • 9:00-9:15AM: Welcoming remarks
    • Harry Selker, MD, MSPH
      Dean and Principal Investigator, Tufts CTSI; Executive Director, Institute for Clinical Research and Health Policy Studies, Tufts Medical Center
  • 9:15-10:00AM: Keynote address:
    • John R. Mascola, MD
      Director of the Dale and Betty Bumpers Vaccine Research Center (VRC) at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), National Institutes of Health (NIH)
      Rapid Response to a Novel Pathogen: COVID-19 Vaccine Development
  • 10:00-10:05AM: Break
  • 10;05AM-noon: Plenary: Scientific talks
  • noon-12:30PM: Lunch break
  • 12:30PM-2:00PM: Concurrent breakout sessions
    • Jonathan Garlick, DDS, PhD
      Director of Science Communications, Tufts CTSI; Director, Tufts Initiative In Civic Science; Professor, School of Dental Medicine, School of Medicine, School of Engineering, Tufts University
      Building Trustworthiness and Vaccine Confidence through Dialogue in COVID-19-vulnerable Communities
    • Kinna Thakarar, DO, MPH
      Assistant Professor of Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine; Attending Physician, Maine Medical Center
      Improving Discharge Decision-making among Vulnerable Hospitalized Patients
  • 2:00-2:05PM: Break
  • 2:05-2:45PM: Plenary: Report-out and next steps
  • 2:45-3:00PM: Closing Remarks
    • Harry Selker, MD, MSPH

Get Social

Look for #TranslationalTufts2021 on social media and join the conversation.

 

Seminars & Workshops
Center for Quantitative Methods and Data Science Seminar 2021: Elena Naumova, PhD, MS

How can data help us to better understand and respond to the synchronization of infectious outbreaks?

The March seminar of the Center for Quantitative Methods and Data Sciences (QM&DS), in partnership with the Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Research Design (BERD) Center at Tufts CTSI and the Data-Intensive Studies Center (DISC) at Tufts University, is Wednesday, March 31, 2:00-3:00PM via Zoom. The topic of this month’s webinar is To Everything There is a Season: Synchronization of Infectious Outbreaks, presented by Elena Naumova, PhD.

A marked seasonality in many infections, like influenza or salmonellosis, is a well-known phenomenon. When we observe a pronounced seasonal pattern, it gives us a reason to expect high predictability of high or low disease incidence periods in a calendar year. With the expansion of national and global surveillance systems, the opportunities to better understand the local, regional, and global temporal fluctuations are also growing. As we learn more about the seasonality of many infections, it is reasonable to expect that some will co-occur. Yet, patterns of co-occurrences and factors driving such synchronization remain elusive.

In this talk, Dr. Naumova will demonstrate the methodology developed to assess the extent, lag, and directionality of seasonal synchronization. Dr. Naumova will provide several examples using national databases, such as the CDC’s Foodborne Disease Active Surveillance Network (FoodNet), National Outbreak Reporting System (NORS), and the FluNet supported by the WHO to illustrate seasonal synchronizations among foodborne infections and the challenges of time-referenced surveillance data. The modeling approaches include the trend-adjusted mixed effects nonlinear harmonic regression models and the delta-method to derive the estimates and confidence intervals for the seasonal peak timing and amplitude, allowing us to build local, regional, and global disease calendars. The methodological rigor, standardization, and data harmonization across surveillance systems are enabling comprehensive characterization of disease seasonality and serve as a pathway for implementing the Precision Public Health, Nutrition, and Medicine principles to tailor prevention and intervention strategies.

Faculty

Elena Naumova, PhD is Professor and Chair of the Division of Nutrition Epidemiology and Data Science at the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University. Dr. Naumova’s area of expertise is in developing methodology for modeling of transient processes with applications in environmental epidemiology, nutrition, infectious diseases, and public health. As a mathematician by training, she designs statistical, computational and mathematical models to characterize and forecast infectious outbreaks. Dr. Naumova is using large-scale data sources to study infections sensitive to climate variations and extreme weather. She led research programs in emerging biomedical fields of epidemiology, immunogenetics, nutrition and growth, nationally and internationally to set new standards for public health investigations. Dr. Naumova is Editor-in-Chief for the Journal of Public Health Policy (Nature Publishing Group). She is currently funded by the NSF to develop ways to train data-savvy workforce, highlight advancements and challenges of data revolution, share examples where the data analytics and data visualizations enhance our knowledge and help to find solutions to wicked problems. Dr. Naumova hopes to stir the discussion on how data scientists have to rethink and reframe the state-of-the-art methodology to enable the discovery of emerging trends in global health fields.

Details

Wednesday, March 31, 2021, 2:00-3:00PM, online via Zoom

Registration

To attend, please enroll here via Tufts CTSI I LEARN.

 

Seminars & Workshops
Center for Quantitative Methods and Data Science Seminar 2021: Thomas Stopka, PhD, MS

How can data help us to better understand and respond to the opioid crisis?

The Center for Quantitative Methods and Data Science, in partnership with the Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Research Design (BERD) Center and the Data-Intensive Studies Center (DISC) will host a virtual seminar series on a Wednesday each month from 2:00-3:00PM.

The session on Wednesday, February 17 will feature Associate Professor Thomas Stopka, PhD, MS. He will give a talk titled Spatial Epidemiological Analysis and Modeling of Opioid Decedent Data.

Abstract

The current opioid crisis has contributed to precipitous increases in opioid use disorder, fatal overdoses, and infectious diseases. Opioid-related overdoses alone have increased five-fold during the past two decades in Massachusetts. Decedent data, available through the Massachusetts Registry for Vital Records and Statistics, provide a valuable resource to better understand and respond to the opioid crisis. Together with his GIS and spatial epidemiology team, Dr. Thomas Stopka has explored the spatial distribution of fatal overdoses across the state to identify high-risk locations and inform targeted public health responses.

In this presentation, Dr. Stopka will provide an overview of his work, with a focus on geo-mapping, spatial epidemiological analyses, statistical modeling, and geographically weighted regression analyses. He will highlight fatal overdose hotspots, factors associated with overdose, spatial access to services, and unique approaches to modeling the risk landscape.

Faculty

Thomas Stopka, MS, PhD is is an associate professor with the Department of Public Health and Community Medicine at Tufts University School of Medicine and Tufts Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI). He has contributed to and led numerous mixed methods, interdisciplinary, and translational studies focused on the intersection of opioid use disorder, overdose, and infectious disease since 1999. Dr. Stopka has employed geographic information systems (GIS), spatial epidemiological, qualitative, biostatistical, and laboratory approaches in multi-site, multi-investigator studies and public health interventions to better understand and curb the opioid syndemic. He currently leads and contributes to several studies funded by the NIH, CDC, SAMHSA, state and local public health departments, and private and philanthropic agencies, with a focus on development and implementation of evidence-based interventions among opioid users in New England. Dr. Stopka is Co-Chair of the Tufts research priority group focused on equity in health, wealth, and civic engagement. He teaches courses in GIS and spatial epidemiology, research methods for public health, and epidemiology.

Details

Date: Wednesday, February 17, 2021, 2:00-3:00PM

Registration

To attend, please enroll via Tufts CTSI I LEARN here.

 

Meeting
Dissemination and Implementation Science Special Interest Group Meeting, February 3

Interested in learning more about implementation science and dissemination and implementation strategies?

You are invited to a virtual Dissemination and Implementation Science Special Interest Group Meeting on Wednesday, February 3, 1:00-2:00 PM to discuss Dr. Jana Leary’s research on implementing a social determinants of health screening in primary care outpatient settings.

The group will learn more about the research project and engage in a discussion about the research. The conversation will be facilitated by Tufts CTSI faculty leads Denise Daudelin, RN, MPH, and Sara Folta, PhD.

Even if you do not have a current project, you are welcome to join to learn more about this emerging field and hear from fellow researchers.

Details

Date: Wednesday, February 3, 1:00-2:00PM

Registration

To attend, please enroll here via Tufts CTSI I LEARN.

Seminars & Workshops
Center for Quantitative Methods and Data Science Seminar 2021: Tanya Karagiannis, MS

How do centenarians delay and defy aging?

The Center for Quantitative Methods and Data Science, in partnership with the Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Research Design (BERD) Center and the Data-Intensive Studies Center (DISC) will host a virtual seminar series on a Wednesday each month from 2:00-3:00PM.

The session on Wednesday, January 20 will feature Research Assistant and PhD Candidate Tanya Karagiannis, MS. She will give a talk titled Analysis of Single Cell Transcriptomics Data as it Relates to Aging and Longevity.

Abstract

Studies of aging have shown a gradual decline in the immune system, such that people experience age-related disabilities and diseases as well as differences in immune population composition and functions over time. However, a rare population of individuals who reach 100 years of age known as centenarians, experience delay in age-related disabilities and diseases and in fact live the majority of their lives in good health. In order to investigate how centenarians delay and defy aging, we utilize single cell transcriptomic methods to investigate longevity related differences in the peripheral blood immune system of centenarians.

Single cell level transcriptomic data has allowed for the profiling of thousands of cells to characterize cell states and populations in specific tissues. More specifically, these methods can be used to identify rare populations and assess transcriptional similarities and differences within a population of cells. We describe integrated analyses using four single cell RNA-sequencing datasets that we conducted to investigate compositional and gene expression differences in immune populations of centenarians and younger age controls (20-80 years).

Early findings demonstrate gene expression differences between centenarians and younger age controls that are specific to populations of cells. We also find centenarians not only have cell type specific compositional differences but overall have more cell type diversity than younger age controls.

Faculty

Tanya Karagiannis is a Research Assistant at Tufts Medical Center in the Institute for Clinical Research and Health Policy Studies, working with Dr. Paola Sebastiani. She has an MS in Bioinformatics from Boston University where she is also continuing her PhD in Bioinformatics under the advisement of Dr. Paola Sebastiani and Dr. Stefano Monti.  Her research focus is in the application and development of single cell transcriptomic methods utilizing machine learning and Bayesian statistics, with interest in multi-omics as well.

Details

Date: Wednesday, January 20, 2020, 2:00-3:00PM

Registration

To attend, please enroll via Tufts CTSI I LEARN here.

 

Meeting
Dissemination and Implementation Science Special Interest Group Meeting

Interested in learning more about implementation science and dissemination and implementation strategies?

You are invited to a virtual Dissemination and Implementation Science Special Interest Group Meeting on Tuesday, December 1, 10:00-11:00AM to present your research project, solicit feedback from other members, and receive advice from Tufts CTSI faculty leads Denise Daudelin, RN, MPH, and Sara Folta, PhD.

Even if you do not have a current project, you are welcome to join to learn more about this emerging field and hear from fellow researchers.

Details

Date: Tuesday, December 1, 10:00-11:00AM

Registration

To attend, please enroll here via Tufts CTSI I LEARN.

Seminars & Workshops
Center for Quantitative Methods and Data Science Seminar: Karl Broman, PhD

Interested in learning how to make your data analysis and other scientific computations reproducible?

The Center for Quantitative Methods and Data Science, in partnership with the Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Research Design (BERD) Center and the Data-Intensive Studies Center (DISC) will host a virtual seminar series on a Wednesday each month from 2:00-3:00PM.

The session on Wednesday, December 16 will feature Karl Broman, PhD. He will give a talk titled Steps Toward Reproducible Research.

Abstract

A minimal standard for data analysis and other scientific computations is that they be reproducible: that the code and data are assembled in a way so that another group can re-create all of the results (e.g., the figures and table in a paper). Adopting a workflow that will make your results reproducible will ultimately make your life easier; if a problem or question arises somewhere down the line, it will be much easier to correct or explain.

But organizing analyses so that they are reproducible is not easy. It requires diligence and a considerable investment of time: to learn new computational tools, and to organize and document analyses as you go. Nevertheless, partially reproducible is better than not at all reproducible. Just try to make your next paper or project better organized than the last. There are many paths toward reproducible research, and you shouldn’t try to change all aspects of your current practices all at once. Identify one weakness, adopt an improved approach, refine that a bit, and then move on to the next thing. Dr. Karl Broman will offer some suggestions for the initial steps to take towards making your work reproducible.

Faculty

Dr. Karl Broman is a Professor in the Department of Biostatistics & Medical Informatics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Dr. Broman is an applied statistician working on the genetics of complex diseases in experimental organisms. He develops the R package, R/qtl, has written a number of short tutorials useful for data scientists, and is very keen to develop tools for interactive data visualization (to view an example, click here).

Details

Date: Wednesday, December 16, 2020, 2:00-3:00PM

Registration

To attend, please enroll via Tufts CTSI I LEARN here.

 

Seminars & Workshops
Taking Responsibility for Building a Trustworthy Research Enterprise

What is your role in being an anti-racist researcher and creating a trustworthy research enterprise?

This webinar will focus on looking at the history of malfeasance in research including up to the present day. We will explore how mistrust of research is mediated through historical and generational trauma and how it impacts present day perceptions of research. We will discuss how we can flip the narrative around mistrust of research as a “barrier” to focus on what researchers can do to become more trustworthy. We will outline specific steps you can take to bring awareness to your labs and study teams to engage in anti-racism and anti-oppression in your work.

You will come away with concrete steps that you can take, resources you can utilize, and continued support from Tufts CTSI to engage in dialogue with your teams and colleagues.

Details

Date: December 9, 2020, noon-1:00PM

Location: I LEARN course management system

Registration

Enroll in Taking Responsibility for Building a Trustworthy Research Enterprise.

CANCELLED
Center for Quantitative Methods and Data Science Seminar: Tanya Karagiannis, MS

This event is cancelled. We apologize for any inconvenience.

The Center for Quantitative Methods and Data Science, in partnership with the Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Research Design (BERD) Center and the Data-Intensive Studies Center (DISC) will host a Zoom seminar series on a Wednesday each month from 2:00-3:00PM.

The November session on Wednesday, November 11 will feature Tanya Karagiannis, MS. She will give a talk titled Analysis of Single Cell Transcriptomics Data as it Relates to Aging and Longevity.

Abstract

Studies of aging have shown a gradual decline in the immune system, such that people experience age-related disabilities and diseases as well as differences in immune population composition and functions over time. However, a rare population of individuals who reach 100 years of age known as centenarians, experience delay in age-related disabilities and diseases and in fact live the majority of their lives in good health. In order to investigate how centenarians delay and defy aging, we utilize single cell transcriptomic methods to investigate longevity related differences in the peripheral blood immune system of centenarians. Single cell level transcriptomic data has allowed for the profiling of thousands of cells to characterize cell states and populations in specific tissues. More specifically, these methods can be used to identify rare populations and assess transcriptional similarities and differences within a population of cells. We describe integrated analyses using four single cell RNA-sequencing datasets that we conducted to investigate compositional and gene expression differences in immune populations of centenarians and younger age controls (20-80 years). Early findings demonstrate gene expression differences between centenarians and younger age controls that are specific to populations of cells. We also find centenarians not only have cell type specific compositional differences but overall have more cell type diversity than younger age controls.

Faculty

Tanya Karagiannis is a Research Assistant at Tufts Medical Center in the Institute for Clinical Research and Health Policy Studies, working with Dr. Paola Sebastiani. She has an MS in Bioinformatics from Boston University where she is also continuing her PhD in Bioinformatics under the advisement of Dr. Paola Sebastiani and Dr. Stefano Monti. Her research focus is in the application and development of single cell transcriptomic methods utilizing machine learning and Bayesian statistics, with interest in multi-omics as well.

Details

Date: Wednesday, November 11, 2020, 2:00-3:00PM

Location: Zoom video conference.

Registration

To receive the link to the Zoom video conference, please register here.

 

Forum
Community Forum on COVID-19 Research – October 2020

How can we ensure equity with the COVID-19 vaccine here in MA?

Please join us for a community conversation of the National Academy of Medicine Framework for Equitable Allocation of Vaccine on Wednesday, October 28 from 5:00-6:00PM.

The program will include a brief overview of the framework by Dr. Ana Diez Roux who sits on the National Academy Committee, followed by a four-person panel, and closing with a group discussion engaging all in attendance.

This is the first in a two-part webinar series focused on understanding how these guidelines for equitable vaccine distribution should be strengthened and implemented locally once a safe and effective vaccine is available.

Panelists include:

  • Lissette Blondet: Executive Director, Massachusetts Association of Community Health Centers
  • Michael Curry: Deputy CEO & General Counsel, Massachusetts League of Community Health Centers
  • Dr. Sara King: Director, Ummah Health
  • Atyia Martin: Black Boston COVID-19 Coalition

Download the event flyer. 

Registration

To sign up, please register here. A Zoom link will be sent to you.

Questions?

Please email community@catalyst.harvard.edu.

 

 

Seminars & Workshops
Scientific Manuscript Writing Workshops – Fall 2020

Overview

Need to transform your ideas into a publishable manuscript? Finding it difficult to write alone without assistance and feedback?

Join Tufts CTSI this fall to begin writing and refining the core sections of your manuscript draft with your colleagues and with an experienced editor.

Commit to attending four working sessions and getting your own manuscript draft, and those of your peers, reviewed before each session. Optional service requests are available for one-on-one consultations on general English writing and peer review.

Dates and Location

All sessions will take place online via Zoom (a link will be provided to those who register), on Wednesdays from 10:30AM-noon.

  • Session I: Wednesday, October 28, 10:30-12:00PM
  • Session II: Wednesday, November 11, 10:30-12:00PM
  • Session III: Wednesday, November 25, 10:30-12:00PM
  • Session IV: Wednesday, December 9, 10:30-12:00PM

Registration and Requirements

Ten slots are available for those who commit to attending and submitting their manuscript drafts prior to all four sessions. You do not need to have your actual final study results or references available to get the essential work done, but it would be beneficial for you to have some elements of a work in progress available for review such as the introduction, methods, or results section of a clinical/translational research paper.

Please register here.

The first assignment is due by Wednesday, October 28:

  • Reading: Welch HG (1999) Preparing manuscripts for submission to medical journals: the paper trail. Eff Clin Pract 2:131–137
  • Submit your first draft in Word to ctsitraining@tuftsmedicalcenter.org. Minimum requirements:
    • One- two paragraphs for the Introduction section
    • Several paragraphs for the Methods and/or Results sections, with subheadings
    • Two to three draft tables or figures that illustrate your principal study findings, even if you don’t have the actual final data available at this time
  • Subsequent drafts and peer review are due three business days prior to each session.
Details

Tufts CTSI is excited to recruit up to 10 motivated biomedical and clinical researchers to join a hands-on workshop series designed to get you started on efficient manuscript writing. Don’t miss this chance for face time with Robert Goldberg, PhD to hear his advice on the elements of preparing successful manuscripts for peer reviewed scientific journals including  navigating major journals, scientific writing style, and approaches to sentence composition.

The program is focused solely on hands-on writing exercises and peer review with expert coaching on manuscript style and content. The participants will incorporate class feedback and submit a new draft each session with a goal of polishing each section of their scientific manuscript in the IMRAD (Introduction, Methods, Results, and Discussion) format.

By the end of the series, you will have completed a solid working draft of a manuscript that will be either ready for peer reviewed submission to a journal, or will be close to submission with some additional final polishing needed.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this workshop series, you should be able to:

  • Discuss the core components of a successful scientific manuscript.
  • Identify strategies and steps for completing a full manuscript for peer review submission.
  • Anticipate reviewers’ concerns in discussing and presenting your research and how to best respond to these concerns.

Workshop Faculty

  • Instructor: Robert J. Goldberg, PhD, Professor, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Department of Population and Quantitative Health Sciences
  • Guest instructor: Nicholas Moustakas, MA, Research Development Specialist, Tufts CTSI

Expectations for Homework and Your Commitment

Registration is on a first come, first served basis and priorities are given to members of Tufts CTSI partner institutions. Once the course is full, additional registrants will be put on a waitlist and invited to the next available opportunity. We will confirm your enrollment as soon we finalize the registration list.

Class attendance is critical to this peer review-based format. If your participation in these workshops needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may optionally provide their contact information when you register for the workshop program.

You will be expected to be actively engaged in classroom discussion. We ask participants to come open-minded and be receptive to constructive feedback.

Tufts CTSI Professional Education & Expectations for Course Participants

Tufts CTSI’s Professional Education programs provide non-degree continuing education and training for clinical and translational research professionals from all Tufts CTSI partners and beyond.

Course enrollment priority is given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions. If your participation needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may provide their contact information when you register for the program.

This course is provided free of charge and is supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Award Number UL1TR002544.  The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

 

Seminars & Workshops
Center for Quantitative Methods and Data Sciences Seminar: Cody Meissner, MD and Norma Terrin, PhD

The Center for Quantitative Methods and Data Sciences, in partnership with the Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Research Design (BERD) Center and the Data-Intensive Studies Center (DISC) will host a Zoom seminar series on a Wednesday each month from 2:00-3:00PM.

The October session on Wednesday, October 21 will feature Cody Meissner, MD, and Norma Terrin, PhD. They will speak about the promise of COVID-19 vaccines in controlling the pandemic.

Abstract

The discussion will cover approaches to SARS-CoV-2 vaccine development; emergency use authorization (EUA) vs. biologic license application (BLA); acceptable safety and effectiveness; unanticipated serious adverse reactions that occurred following introduction of previous vaccines; and vaccine trial sample size justification.

Faculty

Dr. Meissner is Professor of Pediatrics at Tufts University School of Medicine and Head of the Pediatric Infectious Disease Service at Tufts Medical Center. He is a Consultant to the Committee on Infectious Disease and an Associate Editor of the Red Book for the American Academy of Pediatrics. He has served as a member of the Advisory Committee on Infectious Diseases (ACIP) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and continues to advise CDC Work Groups. He presently serves as a member of the National vaccine Advisory Committee (NVAC) and as a member of the Vaccines and Related Biologic Products Advisory Committee (VRBPAC) for the Food and Drug Administration. He serves as a member of the Massachusetts Vaccine Purchasing Council. He has published over 250 papers on various aspects of infectious disease.

Dr. Terrin is the Scientific Director of the BERD Center at Tufts Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI) and Professor at Tufts University School of Medicine. She has collaborated with clinical investigators, including infectious disease researchers, throughout her career, and she served as Statistics Editor at Clinical Infectious Diseases for 12 years.

Details

Date: Wednesday, October 21, 2020, 2:00-3:00PM

Location: Zoom video conference. \

 

 

Seminars & Workshops
Disseminating Research Results to Participants and the Public – Session 3

Does your study follow the best practice of communicating end results to participants? Are you disseminating findings to affected communities that are understandable and actionable?

The new Common Rule (NIH 2017) emphasizes the need for clinical research investigators and teams to provide participants with information they can read, understand and act on. In a recent survey of past clinical trial participants (CISCRP 2019), 68% said they wanted to receive a post-study summary of results they could understand and use, but only 38% reported receiving any such communication.

In this asynchronous, online workshop, participants will learn about health literacy and plain language as a strategic effort to communicate more clearly throughout the clinical research life cycle, practice plain language writing and design techniques to communicate end of study findings, and engage in dialogue and reflection on how to apply lessons learned in practice.

Details

Date: Access course materials at any time from December 2 through December 9, 2020.

Location: I LEARN course management system

Audience: Clinical research investigators and coordinators, and anyone on the clinical research team responsible for communicating results to study participants, are encouraged to attend, especially investigators and study teams with results ready to share.

If you are an investigator with experience sharing study results with study participants and the public, please contact sabrina.kurtz_rossi@tufts.edu so that we may incorporate your experience, questions, and challenges into the content of the training.

To join in this asynchronous training, participants must be able to access the Internet. Participants will be asked to log onto the I LEARN course management system to access all training materials.

Course enrollment priority is given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions.
If your participation needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may provide their contact information when you register for the program.

Registration

Enroll in Dissemination of Research Results to Participants and the Public.

 

Seminars & Workshops
Disseminating Research Results to Participants and the Public – Session 2

Does your study follow the best practice of communicating end results to participants? Are you disseminating findings to affected communities that are understandable and actionable?

The new Common Rule (NIH 2017) emphasizes the need for clinical research investigators and teams to provide participants with information they can read, understand and act on. In a recent survey of past clinical trial participants (CISCRP 2019), 68% said they wanted to receive a post-study summary of results they could understand and use, but only 38% reported receiving any such communication.

Applying a health literacy framework supports study teams to meet the literacy, language, and cultural health communication needs of participants and the public. Using plain language writing and design principles enables study teams to develop results summaries that are relevant, understand and actionable.

This 90-minute online workshop, Disseminating Research Results to Participants and the Public, is led by health literacy and plain language experts from Tufts CTSI faculty, along with guest lectures from the Multi-Regional Clinical Trials (MRCT) Center of Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard and the Center for Information & Study on Clinical Research Participation (CISCRP). Participants will learn about health literacy and plain language as a strategic effort to communicate more clearly throughout the clinical research life cycle, practice plain language writing and design techniques to communicate end of study findings, and engage in dialogue and reflection on how to apply lessons learned in practice.

The workshop will use Zoom video conferencing for live interactive learning and the I LEARN course management system to support applied asynchronous learning activities. This online program will be engaging, interactive, and tailored to meet participant needs.

After attending this event, participants should be able to:

  • Define health literacy and plain language as a strategic approach to communication throughout the clinical research life cycle, with a focus on sharing post-study results with participants and the community
  • Apply plain language writing and design principles when crafting written communications at the close of a study that are tailored to needs of study participants and the public (i.e. drafting a letter to participants describing aggregate results or a one-page fact sheets describing relevant findings to the public).

Faculty

Sabrina Kurtz-Rossi, MEd, is Assistant Professor of Public Health and Community Medicine at Tufts University School of Medicine. Kurtz-Rossi has extensive experience teaching with technology and creating engaging and tailored remote learning experiences. She will introduce the fundamentals of health literacy and plain language in health and science communication with the public.

Sylvia Baedorf Kassis, MPH, is Program Manager for Health Literacy in Clinical Research at the Multi-Regional Clinical Trials (MRCT) Center of Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard. Baedorf Kassis will cover health literacy throughout the clinical research life cycle and specifically techniques for communicating results to study participants.

Behtash Bahador, MS, is Associate Director of Relationship Management and Development at the Center for Information & Study on Clinical Research Participation (CISCRP). Bahador will offer further specific guidance and resources on the return of results and will use case examples to facilitate communication of research results to affected communities.

Details

Date: Wednesday, November 4, 2020, 10:00–11:30AM (90 min)

Location: Zoom video conference and I LEARN course management system

Clinical research investigators and coordinators, and anyone on the clinical research team responsible for communicating results to study participants, are encouraged to attend, especially investigators and study teams with results ready to share.

If you are an investigator with experience sharing study results with study participants and the public, please contact sabrina.kurtz_rossi@tufts.edu so that we may incorporate your experience, questions, and challenges into the content of the training.

To join in this live, 90-minute online event, participants must be able to access the Internet using a device with audio and video camera capabilities. Participants will receive an invitation to join the training live via Zoom and to log onto the I LEARN course management system to access all training materials. Please join the training from a location that has reliable internet access and limited background noise.

Course enrollment priority is given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions.

If your participation needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may provide their contact information when you register for the program.

Registration

To attend, please register here.

Tufts CTSI Professional Education & Expectations for Course Participants

Tufts CTSI’s Professional Education programs provide non-degree continuing education and training for clinical and translational research professionals from all Tufts CTSI partners and beyond.

Course enrollment priority is given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions. If your participation needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may provide their contact information when you register for the program.

This course is provided free of charge and is supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Award Number UL1TR002544.  The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

Information Session
National COVID Cohort Collaborative (N3C) Q&A Session

Do you want to learn about the National COVID Cohort Collaborative (N3C)?

Join our virtual N3C Q&A session moderated by Andrew Williams, PhD, Tufts CTSI Associate Director of Informatics. All Tufts CTSI partners and collaborators are encouraged to attend.

Dr. Williams and Tufts CTSI Informatics staff are on the N3C Collaborative Analytics leadership team and lead the Tools and Resources N3C working group, co-lead and contribute to task teams on synthetic clinical data resources, clinical scenarios, data methods, implementation science, and governance. During the session you will hear a short summary about the N3C enclave as a resource and how to access it, with an opportunity to ask questions.

Details

Date: Tuesday, October 13, 2020, 4:00PM

Location: Zoom video conference

Registration

To attend, please register here.

A link to the Zoom meeting will be sent to you.

Questions?

Please email Svetlana Rojevsky, MSc at srojevsky@tuftsmedicalcenter.org.

Seminars & Workshops
Center for Quantitative Methods and Data Sciences Seminar: Karin Knudson, PhD

The Center for Quantitative Methods and Data Sciences, in partnership with the Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Research Design (BERD) Center and the Data-Intensive Studies Center (DISC) will host a Zoom seminar series on the fourth Wednesday of the month from 2:00-3:00PM.

The first session on Wednesday, September 23 will feature Karin Knudson, PhD, Senior Data Scientist with DISC. She will speak about the estimation of ataxia severity and disease classification from wearable sensor recordings.

Abstract

Wearable sensor data offer the potential for rich and interpretable descriptions of behavioral characteristics of ataxia and other neurodegenerative diseases. High quality behavioral biomarkers are important for understanding disease progression, assessing efficacy in clinical trials, and supporting early diagnosis and targeted interventions. In this talk we present methods for using accelerometer and gyroscope time series data from wearable sensors in order to accurately distinguish patients with ataxia from healthy controls and to estimate disease severity. We combine information from an autoregressive hidden Markov model variant and time-frequency analysis to create a flexible, extensible, and meaningful quantitative description of movement and to perform severity estimation and disease classification with short periods of data collection.

Faculty

Dr. Knudson is a Senior Data Scientist with the Tufts Data Intensive Studies Center (DISC). Her research has involved the development and application of methods from machine learning, Bayesian statistics, and compressive sensing, particularly to neural data. Before joining Tufts, she was a Research Fellow in the Department of Neurology at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, and was previously the Chair of the Department of Mathematics, Statistics, and Computer Science at Phillips Academy. She completed her PhD in Mathematics at the University of Texas at Austin.

Details

Date: Wednesday, September 23, 2020, 2:00-3:00PM

Location: Zoom video conference.

 

 

Conferences & Symposia
6th Annual Asian Health Symposium: A Virtual Event Part 3

Talking about Casino Gambling: Community Voices from Boston Chinatown

This presentation summarizes a study of casino gambling behavior of residents and workers in Boston Chinatown.

The aim of the study was to learn about the trajectory and life context of individual participants’ gambling activity, including how individual participants describe their motivation, nature, and frequency of gambling, and its effects on self and family.

The research was conducted by a university-based research team in partnership with the Boston Chinatown Neighborhood Center, and with the assistance of the Massachusetts Council on Compulsive Gambling.

By the end of this session, participants should be able to:

  • Understand features of gambling behavior and problems, including risk and protective factors, by interpreting interviews of workers and residents in Boston Chinatown.
  • Examine social determinants of gambling problems or addiction, including poverty, job stress, social isolation, and lack of healthy recreational alternatives.
  • Understand the benefits of family-based counseling approaches to address gambling problems in this population.

Presenters

Carolyn Wong, Research Associate
Institute for Asian American Studies, University of Massachusetts Boston

Yoyo Yau, Director of Programs
Boston Chinatown Neighborhood Center (BCNC)

Discussant:
Victor Ortiz, Director
Office of Problem Gambling Services, Department of Public Health (DPH)

Details

Wednesday, October 21, 2020, noon-1:00PM

Online via Zoom (please register to receive the Zoom link and password).

Registration

All are welcome to attend. Please register here.

 

 

This event is provided free of charge, and was supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Award Number UL1TR002544. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

Conferences & Symposia
6th Annual Asian Health Symposium: A Virtual Event Part 2

Housing and Health: Exploring Perceptions of Housing and Neighborhood among Residents in a Subsidized Boston Chinatown Housing Complex

In this interactive session, a multi-disciplinary team of researchers and community partners seek reactions and actionable next steps based on findings from a natural experiment designed to explore interrelationships of housing and social determinants on low-income families’ well-being.

In 2019/2020, housing lottery “winners” in Chinatown were surveyed along with applicants who were still “waitlisted” for affordable housing. Results include comparisons of housing and neighborhoods, social and community cohesion, and satisfaction with life and life situations between the residents of the new subsidized housing complex and those still on the waiting list.

By the end of this session, participants should be able to:

  • Identify and explore cross-cutting issues for families seeking to stabilize and improve their lives.
  • Discuss implications for local housing providers, developers, and policy makers regarding investing in housing and neighborhoods.
  • Identify actionable next steps for disseminating and/or operationalizing findings.

Presenters

Virginia Chomitz, Associate Professor
Public Health and Community Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine

Angie Liou, Executive Director
Asian Community Development Corporation (ACDC)

Discussant:
Elana Brochin, Program Director for Health Equity
Massachusetts Association of Community Development Corporations (MACDC)

Details

Wednesday, October 14, 2020, noon-1:00PM

Online via Zoom (please register to receive the Zoom link and password).

Registration

All are welcome to attend. Please register here.

 

 

This event is provided free of charge, and was supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Award Number UL1TR002544. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

Seminars & Workshops
Disseminating Research Results to Participants and the Public

Does your study follow the best practice of communicating end results to participants? Are you disseminating findings to affected communities that are understandable and actionable?

The new Common Rule (NIH 2017) emphasizes the need for clinical research investigators and teams to provide participants with information they can read, understand and act on. In a recent survey of past clinical trial participants (CISCRP 2019), 68% said they wanted to receive a post-study summary of results they could understand and use, but only 38% reported receiving any such communication.

Applying a health literacy framework supports study teams to meet the literacy, language, and cultural health communication needs of participants and the public. Using plain language writing and design principles enables study teams to develop results summaries that are relevant, understand and actionable.

This 90-minute online workshop, Disseminating Research Results to Participants and the Public, is led by health literacy and plain language experts from Tufts CTSI faculty, along with guest lectures from the Multi-Regional Clinical Trials (MRCT) Center of Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard and the Center for Information & Study on Clinical Research Participation (CISCRP). Participants will learn about health literacy and plain language as a strategic effort to communicate more clearly throughout the clinical research life cycle, practice plain language writing and design techniques to communicate end of study findings, and engage in dialogue and reflection on how to apply lessons learned in practice.

The workshop will use Zoom video conferencing for live interactive learning and the I LEARN course management system to support applied asynchronous learning activities. This online program will be engaging, interactive, and tailored to meet participant needs.

After attending this event, participants should be able to:

  • Define health literacy and plain language as a strategic approach to communication throughout the clinical research life cycle, with a focus on sharing post-study results with participants and the community
  • Apply plain language writing and design principles when crafting written communications at the close of a study that are tailored to needs of study participants and the public (i.e. drafting a letter to participants describing aggregate results or a one-page fact sheets describing relevant findings to the public).

Faculty

Sabrina Kurtz-Rossi, MEd, is Assistant Professor of Public Health and Community Medicine at Tufts University School of Medicine. Kurtz-Rossi has extensive experience teaching with technology and creating engaging and tailored remote learning experiences. She will introduce the fundamentals of health literacy and plain language in health and science communication with the public.

Sylvia Baedorf Kassis, MPH, is Program Manager for Health Literacy in Clinical Research at the Multi-Regional Clinical Trials (MRCT) Center of Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard. Baedorf Kassis will cover health literacy throughout the clinical research life cycle and specifically techniques for communicating results to study participants.

Behtash Bahador, MS, is Associate Director of Relationship Management and Development at the Center for Information & Study on Clinical Research Participation (CISCRP). Bahador will offer further specific guidance and resources on the return of results and will use case examples to facilitate communication of research results to affected communities.

Details

Date: Wednesday, October 7, 2020, 10:00–11:30 noon (90 min)

Location: Zoom video conference and I LEARN course management system

Clinical research investigators and coordinators, and anyone on the clinical research team responsible for communicating results to study participants, are encouraged to attend, especially investigators and study teams with results ready to share.

If you are an investigator with experience sharing study results with study participants and the public, please contact sabrina.kurtz_rossi@tufts.edu so that we may incorporate your experience, questions, and challenges into the content of the training.

To join in this live, 90-minute online event, participants must be able to access the Internet using a device with audio and video camera capabilities. Participants will receive an invitation to join the training live via Zoom and to log onto the I LEARN course management system to access all training materials. Please join the training from a location that has reliable internet access and limited background noise.

Course enrollment priority is given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions.

If your participation needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may provide their contact information when you register for the program.

Registration

To attend, please register here.

Tufts CTSI Professional Education & Expectations for Course Participants

Tufts CTSI’s Professional Education programs provide non-degree continuing education and training for clinical and translational research professionals from all Tufts CTSI partners and beyond.

Course enrollment priority is given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions. If your participation needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may provide their contact information when you register for the program.

This course is provided free of charge and is supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Award Number UL1TR002544.  The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

Seminars & Workshops
Research Database Development Part 3: Advanced REDCap Features

Overview

Are you involved in building a REDCap database for your research project?

Building an appropriate database for your study is critical to ensuring successful data collection and analysis. Learn how to build your database in this three-part Research Database Development course presented by Tufts CTSI. There are no pre-requisites required for any of the three course registrations, but participation in all three courses is encouraged as they build on each other.

Part 3: Advanced REDCap Features

This two-hour session will begin with a demonstration of commonly used advanced REDCap features, Informatics Project Coordinator at Tufts CTSI, followed by an interactive conversation answering participants’ real-life REDCap questions.

Topics covered include:

  • Complex piping and calculations within REDCap forms
  • Establishing workflows with the Survey Queue and Alerts and Notifications sections
  • Understanding how Action Tags can be used to help guide data collection
  • Ensuring high-quality input by establishing Data Quality rules

After attending this session, participants should be able to:

  • Identify use cases for advanced REDCap features
  • Implement commonly-used advanced features in REDCap projects

Details

Date: Friday, August 28, 10:00AM-noon

Location: online via Zoom

Registration

Members of any Tufts CTSI-affiliated institution are welcome to attend.

To receive the Zoom link, please register here.

Instructor

Rachael Huebner, MPH is the Clinical Data Manager at Tufts CTSI, providing data management support and training to researchers. Prior to joining Tufts, she worked in data management for industry-sponsored clinical trials after receiving her MPH from Boston University School of Public Health.

Tufts CTSI Professional Education & Expectation for Course Participants

Tufts CTSI’s Professional Education programs provide non-degree continuing education and training for clinical and translational research professionals from all Tufts CTSI partners and beyond.

Course enrollment priority is given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions. If your participation needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may provide their contact information when you register for the program.

This course is provided free of charge, and was supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of health, Award Number UL1TR002544. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

 

Seminars & Workshops
Research Database Development Part 2: Building a REDCap Database

Overview

Are you involved in building a REDCap database for your research project?

Building an appropriate database for your study is critical to ensuring successful data collection and analysis. Learn how to build your database in this three-part Research Database Development course presented by Tufts CTSI. There are no pre-requisites required for any of the three course registrations, but participation in all three courses is encouraged as they build on each other.

Part 2: Building a REDCap Database

This two-hour session will consist of a guided tutorial, followed by a discussion on building REDCap databases for your own research. Participants should be prepared to discuss their research projects. Instructors will work with you to create REDCap accounts prior to this session.

Topics covered include:

  • Introduction to REDCap
  • Creating projects, forms, and fields
  • Exporting data

After attending this session, participants should be able to:

  • Describe the differences between classic and longitudinal projects, and identify when to use each
  • Create projects, forms, and fields in REDCap
  • Export data from REDCap to Excel

Details

Date: Thursday, August 27, 10:00AM-noon

Location: online via Zoom

Registration

Members of any Tufts CTSI-affiliated institution are welcome to attend.

To receive the Zoom link, please register here.

Instructors

Rachael Huebner, MPH is the Clinical Data Manager at Tufts CTSI, providing data management support and training to researchers. Prior to joining Tufts, she worked in data management for industry-sponsored clinical trials after receiving her MPH from Boston University School of Public Health.

Tufts CTSI Professional Education & Expectation for Course Participants

Tufts CTSI’s Professional Education programs provide non-degree continuing education and training for clinical and translational research professionals from all Tufts CTSI partners and beyond.

Course enrollment priority is given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions. If your participation needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may provide their contact information when you register for the program.

This course is provided free of charge, and was supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of health, Award Number UL1TR002544. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

 

Seminars & Workshops
Research Database Development Part 1: Basics & Best Practices

Overview

Are you involved in building a REDCap database for your research project?

Building an appropriate database for your study is critical to ensuring successful data collection and analysis. Learn how to build your database in this three-part Research Database Development course presented by Tufts CTSI. There are no pre-requisites required for any of the three course registrations, but participation in all three courses is encouraged as they build on each other.

Part 1: Basics & Best Practices

This two-hour session will begin with an interactive lecture presented by Rachael Huebner, MPH, Clinical Data Manager at Tufts CTSI, followed by a workshop in which participants will practice building a simple database in Excel. Participation will be required for the workshop portion.

Pre-requisite: none

Topics covered include:

  • Database development best practices
  • Determining which data to collect
  • Choosing variable types
  • Naming variables
  • Assigning numbers to variables
  • Using Excel to create a database

After attending this session, participants should be able to:

  • Recognize database creation best practices
  • Identify the clinical and demographic data needed to answer a study question
  • Effectively name and code variables
  • Create an Excel sheet appropriate for study data collection

Details

Date: Wednesday, August 26, 10:00AM-noon

Location: online via Zoom

Registration

Members of any Tufts CTSI-affiliated institution are welcome to attend.

To receive the Zoom link, please register here.

Instructors

Rachael Huebner, MPH is the Clinical Data Manager at Tufts CTSI, providing data management support and training to researchers. Prior to joining Tufts, she worked in data management for industry-sponsored clinical trials after receiving her MPH from Boston University School of Public Health.

Tufts CTSI Professional Education & Expectation for Course Participants

Tufts CTSI’s Professional Education programs provide non-degree continuing education and training for clinical and translational research professionals from all Tufts CTSI partners and beyond.

Course enrollment priority is given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions. If your participation needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may provide their contact information when you register for the program.

This course is provided free of charge, and was supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of health, Award Number UL1TR002544. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

 

Seminars & Workshops
Foundations of Team Science Workshop

Are you an investigator interested in learning practical skills for working on team-based research projects?


Contemporary biomedical and health research grants often involve more than a single principal investigator (PI) or working with the lab down the hall. Whether focused on a public health strategy or a novel treatment, scientists increasingly find they need to work as part of a team with collaborators from different disciplines, institutions, and communities.

To help researchers succeed in a team-based environment, Tufts Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI) and the Tufts University Office of Research Development are offering a workshop on team science fundamentals. Developed with the assistance ofthe Tufts Technology Services Design Practice, the intensive four-hour training provides an evidence-based framework for effective collaboration planning. Participants will gain practical skills for building cohesive teams and strategies that are adaptable to diverse research domains and settings.

By the end of this interactive symposium, event participants should be able to:

  • Understand the importance of team science skills to successful research outcomes
  • Understand the team science competencies needed for building new research teams
  • Use tools and strategies for:
    • Formulating shared goals and vision
    • Understanding individual contributions, opportunities for collaboration, and gaps within the team
    • Creating a collaboration plan.

Details

Wednesday, September 30, 2020, 10:00 –11:30AM, and
Wednesday, October 7, 2020, 10:00am –noon.

Location: Online via Zoom (a link will be emailed to those who register).

This workshop is open to faculty and research staff at any level. The curriculum is designed to be useful to new and experienced investigators, including seasoned PIs interested in developing program- or center-level proposals.

This will be a two-part workshop for a total of three-and-one-half hours. Registrants are expected to attend both parts A and B, and complete a short (20-30 minute) homework assignment between the sessions.

This is the first workshop in a series that Tufts CTSI will be offering on Team Science. Participants will be able to join any or all at no cost.

Registration

To attend, please register here by September 23, 2020.

Agenda – Part A, September 30

  • 10:00AM: Welcome: Defining Team Science and the Need for a Team-Based Approach
  • 10:15AM: Team Science Competencies and Strategies Overview
  • 10:30AM: Individual Collaboration Readiness
  • 10:45AM: Milestone Brainstorm
  • 11:00AM: Prepare for Part B Grand Challenge Scenario
  • 11:15AM: Wrap-up

Agenda – Part B, October 7

  • 10:00AM: Review and Introduction to Grand Challenge Scenario
  • 10:15AM: Breakout Groups: Shared Visions Statements and Milestones
  • 11:15AM: Report Out
  • 11:25AM: Collaboration Plan Demonstration
  • 11:45AM: Wrap-up

Tufts CTSI Professional Education & Expectations for Course Participants

Tufts CTSI’s Professional Education programs provide non-degree continuing education and training for clinical and translational research professionals from all Tufts CTSI partners and beyond.

Course enrollment priority is given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions. If your participation needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may provide their contact information when you register for the program.

This course is provided free of charge and is supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Award Number UL1TR002544.  The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

Forum
Community Forum on COVID-19 Research – August 2020

Want to learn about the latest COVID-19 research happening here at home?

Meet online via Zoom with researchers from the four federally-funded Clinical and Translational Science Awards hubs in Massachusetts (Tufts CTSI, BU-CTSI, Harvard Catalyst, and UMass CCTS) to hear about how they’re working together to protect us from COVID-19.

After the researchers’ presentations, there will be an open discussion about health equity. Community members are especially encouraged to attend.

Please join us for our August 2020 Community Forum: Non-contact (and Socially Distanced) Vital Signs and Medical Measurement

by Brian Anthony, PhD, Director of MIT’s Master of Engineering in Manufacturing Program, Co-Director of the Medical Electronic Device Realization Center, and Deputy Director for the MIT Skoltech Initiative.

and

Catherine Ricciardi, DNP, ANP-BC, Nurse Director, Director of Clinical Operations, and Nurse
Practitioner; MIT Institute for Medical Engineering and Science, Clinical Research Center

Thursday, August 25, noon-1:00PM, online via Zoom.

Download a flyer here (PDF).

 

 

 

Forum
Community Forum: Moving Towards a Racially Just and Equitable Health Research Enterprise

How can we transform research to ensure an equitable, healthy, and safe future for everyone?

Research designed to enhance well-being and improve health outcomes is the cornerstone of the health and welfare of our population, yet it has been impacted by structural racial bias historically embedded within our society.

From the earliest medical studies on enslaved African women, to experimentation on African American men in Tuskegee Alabama, among others, the research enterprise has carried a legacy of racial bias out of which emerged our principles of human subject research. The success and benefits of health-related research over the last century are enormous and impactful, yet systemic inequities persist.

Program

This Community Forum will include three short presentations that explore pathways to more racially just and equitable research practice by examining systemic/structural racism related to:

  • Diverse workforce development
  • Prioritization of research interests and resources
  • Lack of integration of underrepresented populations and the explicit recognition of the role of racial hierarchies.

Presentations will focus on recommendations for next steps, followed by a facilitated discussion guided by the question: How can we transform research, with consideration for past and present experiences of racism and marginalization, towards an equitable, healthy, and safe future for everyone?

Presenters

Sara Folta, PhD, MS, Director of Integrating Underrepresented Populations in Research
Linda Hudson, ScD, MSPH, Associate Director of Integrating Underrepresented Populations in Research
Robert Sege, MD, PhD, Co-Director of Stakeholder and Community Engagement and Lead Navigator
Christine Sinclair, MS, MA, Project Manager, Integrating Underrepresented Populations in Research

Details

Thursday, July 2
4:00-5:00PM
Online via Zoom (a link will be provided to those who register)

 

 

 

 

Forum
Community Forum on COVID-19 Research – Week 4

Want to learn about the latest COVID-19 research happening here at home?

Meet online with researchers from the four federally-funded Clinical and Translational Science Awards institutions in Massachusetts (Tufts CTSI, BU-CTSI, Harvard Catalyst, and UMass CCTS) to hear about how they’re working together to protect us from COVID-19.

We will offer a Community Forum each week so you can be part of these important conversations.

Please join us for our fourth Community Forum: Building a Research Infrastructure for Equity in COVID-19 Treatment
by Benjamin Linas, MD, MPH of Boston University School of Medicine.

Thursday, May 14, 4:00-5:00PM, online via Zoom

Registration

To sign up, please register here. A Zoom link will be sent to you.

Questions?

Please email Community Engagement Program Director, Tracy Battaglia: Tracy.Battaglia@bmc.org.

 

 

 

 

Forum
Community Forum on COVID-19 Research – Week 3

Want to learn about the latest COVID-19 research happening here at home?

Meet online with researchers from the four federally-funded Clinical and Translational Science Awards institutions in Massachusetts (Tufts CTSI, BU-CTSI, Harvard Catalyst, and UMass CCTS) to hear about how they’re working together to protect us from COVID-19.

We will offer a Community Forum each week for the next month so you can be part of these important conversations.

Please join us for our third Community Forum: Getting to the Post-pandemic era: Herd Immunity, Social Distancing, and Vaccine
by Yonatan Grad, MD, PhD of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

Monday, May 4, 4:00-5:00PM, online via Zoom

Registration

To sign up, please register here. A Zoom link will be sent to you.

Questions?

Please email Community Engagement Program Director, Rebekka Lee: rlee@hsph.harvard.edu.

 

 

 

 

Forum
Community Forum on COVID-19 Research – Week 2

Want to learn about the latest COVID-19 research happening here at home?

Meet online with researchers from the four federally-funded Clinical and Translational Science Awards institutions in Massachusetts (Tufts CTSI, BU-CTSI, Harvard Catalyst, and UMass CCTS) to hear about how they’re working together to protect us from COVID-19.

We will offer a Community Forum each week for the next month so you can be part of these important conversations.

Please join us for our second Community Forum: RNA Therapeutics: Informational Drugs as a Pandemic Response Tool
by Anastasia Khvorova, PhD of the UMass Center for Clinical and Translational Science (CCTS).

Thursday, April 30, 4:00-5:00PM, online via Zoom

Registration

To sign up, please register here. A Zoom link will be sent to you.

Questions?

Please email communityengagement@umassmed.edu.

 

 

 

 

Forum
Community Forum on COVID-19 Research – Week 1

Want to learn about the latest COVID-19 research happening here at home?

Meet online with researchers from the four federally-funded Clinical and Translational Science Awards institutions in Massachusetts (Tufts CTSI, BU-CTSI, Harvard Catalyst, and UMass CCTS) to hear about how they’re working together to protect us from COVID-19.

We will offer a Community Forum each week for the next month so you can be part of these important conversations.

Please join us for our first Community Forum: Modeling the COVID Epidemic in Real Time
by Joshua Cohen, PhD of Tufts Medical Center and Tufts University School of Medicine.

Thursday, April 23, 4:00-5:00PM, online via Zoom

Registration

Registration for this event is now full.

 

 

 

 

 

Seminars & Workshops
Scientific Manuscript Writing Workshops – Spring 2020

Overview

Ready to transform your research into a manuscript suitable for a peer-reviewed publication?

Find out what editors want and gain confidence in your writing at this Spring’s Scientific Manuscript Writing Workshop.

This three-session workshop will review the process of constructing scientific papers that are logically organized, concisely written, and attentive to reader and reviewer expectations.

You will prepare and present the main sections of a research paper in the IMRAD (introduction, methods, results, and discussion) format, and will receive constructive critiques and written comments. By the end of the sessions, you will have a more polished draft that can stand up to rigorous peer review.

The workshop will be led by Robert J. Goldberg, PhD, a senior researcher who brings with him a wealth of writing and submission expertise from many years as a mentor, journal editor, and medical school writing course director.

Dates and Location

All sessions will take place online via Zoom (a link will be provided to those who register), on Mondays from 2:30pm-3:30PM.

  • Session I (Monday, May 4): Effective Scientific Writing & Review of Examples & Group Review: Introduction
  • Session II (Monday, May 11): Group Review: Data & Figures
  • Session III (Monday, May 18): Group Review: Data & Figures (Version 2)
  • Optional request for one-on-one feedback, but must submit the best version of your manuscript by June 18th for detailed feedback.

Registration and Requirements

Any post-graduate clinical, health services, or public health investigators who have original research intended for publication and peer feedback for writing support are welcome to apply.

Participants are strongly encouraged to attend all three workshop sessions.

Registration for this course is now full. If you would like to be added to the waitlist, please email training@tuftsctsi.org

Registration is on a first come, first served, basis and priority is given to members of Tufts CTSI partner institutions. Once the course is full, additional registrants will be put on a waitlist and invited to the next opportunity. We will confirm your enrollment as soon we finalize the registration list.

Enrolled seats will be prioritized to faculty members who commit to attending and completing all assigned prework. You do not have to have actual study results ready to get the essential work done, but this course will directly benefit those who already have some elements of a work in progress on the introduction, methods, or results section of a paper.

To facilitate effective peer review experiences, we prioritize manuscripts addressing original scientific projects in the areas of clinical and public health research. Class attendance is critical to this peer review-based format. You will be expected to provide thoughtful reviews of attendees drafts and actively engage in classroom discussion. This course is not intended for basic science researchers. Basic science researchers seeking individualized feedback on their manuscript are encouraged to submit a service request at https://informatics.tuftsctsi.org/pims/request.htm.

Details

Learning Objectives

By the end of this workshop series, you will be able to:

  • Discuss the core components of a successful scientific manuscript.
  • Identify strategies and next steps for completing a full manuscript for peer review submission.
  • Anticipate reviewers’ concerns in discussing and presenting your research in writing and how to best respond to any concerns raised.

Workshop Faculty

  • Instructor: Robert J. Goldberg, PhD, Professor, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Department of Population and Quantitative Health Sciences
  • Guest instructor: Nicholas Moustakas, MA, Research Development Specialist, Tufts CTSI

Course Participation

By enrolling in this course, you are agreeing to complete all pre-work assignments, including submitting your draft of the assigned section by the Wednesday prior to peer reviews, and preparing thoughtful comments on colleagues’ drafts for discussion during the session.

Pre-work Deadlines

Submit all drafts to training@tuftsctsi.org by the due dates specified below.

  • Thursday April 29
    • Submit your Introduction section by April 29th (1 or 1 ¼ pages OR three paragraphs; double-spaced)
  • Monday, May 4, Session 1
    • Readings:
      • Welch HG (1999) Preparing manuscripts for submission to medical journals: the paper trail. Eff Clin Pract 2:131–137
      • Example article for critical review: To be emailed ahead of time
      • Example article for critical review: To be emailed ahead of time
    • Review/prepare comments for peers’ introductions
  • Thursday, May 7
    • Submit three – five tables or figures, with a brief description of each
  • Monday, May 11, Session 2
    • Review/prepare comments for peers’ drafts
  • Thursday, May 14
    • Submit updated three – five tables or figures, with a brief description of each
  • Monday, May 18, Session 3
    • Review/prepare comments for peers’ drafts
  • Thursday June 18
    • Final Day to submit Manuscripts for feedback

Tufts CTSI Professional Education & Expectations for Course Participants

Tufts CTSI’s Professional Education programs provide non-degree continuing education and training for clinical and translational research professionals from all Tufts CTSI partners and beyond.

Course enrollment priority is given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions. If your participation needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may provide their contact information when you register for the program.

This course is provided free of charge and is supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Award Number UL1TR002544.  The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

 

Seminars & Workshops
Research Database Creation: Basics and Best Practices 2020

Overview

Are you involved in building a database for your research project?

Building an appropriate database for your study is critical to ensuring successful data collection and analysis. Learn how to build a database in this 90-minute Tufts CTSI workshop, Research Database Creation: Basics & Best Practices. This session will begin with an interactive lecture presented by Rachael Huebner, a Clinical Data Manager at Tufts CTSI, followed by a workshop in which participants will practice building a simple database in Excel.

This workshop is a prerequisite to a subsequent workshop, Research Database Creation: Building a REDCap Database.  Please note, in this workshop, we will not be using REDCap, but we will be learning the fundamentals required for database creation, which will inform our second session where REDCap will be used.

After attending this event, you should be able to:

  • Recognize database creation best practices
  • Identify the clinical and demographic data needed to answer a study question
  • Effectively name and code variables
  • Create an Excel sheet appropriate for study data collection

Details

Date: Thursday, March 12, noon-1:30PM

Location: ONLINE ONLY

This workshop is a prerequisite to a subsequent workshop, Research Database Creation: Building a REDCap Database.

Registration

This workshop is designed for research assistants, clinical research coordinators, investigators, residents, and fellows who will be creating or working with databases for research projects.

To attend, please register here by March 5.

Tufts CTSI Professional Education & Expectation for Course Participants

Tufts CTSI’s Professional Education programs provide non-degree continuing education and training for clinical and translational research professionals from all Tufts CTSI partners and beyond.

Course enrollment priority is given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions. If your participation needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may provide their contact information when you register for the program.

This course is provided free of charge, and was supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of health, Award Number UL1TR002544. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

 

Seminars & Workshops
Research Database Creation: Building a REDCap Database 2020

Overview

Are you involved in building a REDCap database for your research project?

REDCap is an online application that can be used to create research databases. It has many advantages over Excel, and is often the preferred tool for database creation. Learn how to create REDCap databases for your research projects in this 90-minute Tufts CTSI workshop, Research Database Creation: Building a REDCap Database.

This session will consist of a guided tutorial, led by Rachael Huebner, Clinical Data Manager at Tufts CTSI, in which participants will build a simple database in REDCap.

To attend this event, participants must attend the first workshop in this series, Research Database Creation: Basics & Best Practices.

After attending this event, you should be able to:

  • Describe the differences between classic and longitudinal projects, and identify when to use each
  • Create projects, forms, and fields in REDCap
  • Export data from REDCap to Excel

Details

Date: Thursday, March 26, noon-1:30PM

Location: Tufts Center for Medical Education, Room 514 (Computer Lab), 145 Harrison Avenue, Boston

To attend this event, participants must attend the first workshop in this series, Research Database Creation: Basics & Best Practices.

Registration

This workshop is designed for research assistants, clinical research coordinators, investigators, residents, and fellows who will be creating or working with databases for research projects.

Space is limited.

To reserve your seat, please register here by March 19.

Tufts CTSI Professional Education & Expectation for Course Participants

Tufts CTSI’s Professional Education programs provide non-degree continuing education and training for clinical and translational research professionals from all Tufts CTSI partners and beyond.

Course enrollment priority is given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions. If your participation needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may provide their contact information when you register for the program.

This course is provided free of charge, and was supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of health, Award Number UL1TR002544. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

 

Seminars & Workshops
Applying Implementation Science Frameworks to Your Research Plans and Ongoing Studies

Do you have a grant proposal or protocol for an intervention involving hospitals, schools, and local communities?

If you’d like to hone your research aims and strategy to show a clear roadmap for successful translation in real-world settings, join Tufts CTSI on Wednesday, June 24 for a two-part interactive online workshop: Applying Implementation Science Frameworks to Your Research Plans and Ongoing Studies.

Apply by Monday, June 22 for one of 12 seats for researchers working in translational research.

Overview

In this two-part series, all applicants commit to up to two ½ hours of learning time and complete the following:

  • Part 1, Pre-work online course (approx. 1 hour), complete by June 23: Prepared by the workshop instructors, this short course provides an overview of two common implementation frameworks used in grant proposals, RE-AIM (the Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation, and Maintenance Framework) and CFIR (the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research), and how the CFIR framework, combined with ERIC (Expert Recommendations for Implementing Change) strategies, can be used in planning for protocol implementation or problem solving. You will learn what these frameworks are, when to use them, and how to best integrate them into a grant proposal or ongoing study.
  • Part 2, Live online workshop (90 minutes), June 24, 2020, 10:00-11:30AM:  Those who complete the Part 1 assignment will be invited to an interactive live meeting (Zoom) where you will meet with the instructors and colleagues in real time to review the frameworks through case examples and discussions on potential challenges in your proposal or protocol. Participants will be required to ensure audio/video quality of their live online meeting participation and login 10 minutes prior to the session.The workshop agenda may include:
    • Introductions and Overview
    • Review of the Implementation Science Frameworks/Q&A
    • Case Discussions: Examples of Implementation Science Frameworks in a Grant Proposal and Ongoing Study
    • Workshops: Participant Challenges and Cases

Instructors

  • Sara C. Folta, PhD, Director, Integrating Underrepresented Populations in Research, Tufts CTSI; Associate Professor, Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy: Dr. Folta and colleagues implemented, evaluated, and nationally disseminated the StrongWomen – Healthy Hearts program for cardiovascular disease prevention among midlife and older women.
  • Denise Daudelin, RN, MPH, Director, Research Process Improvement, Tufts CTSI; Assistant Professor of Medicine, Tufts University Public Health and Community Medicine: Ms. Daudelin is an Investigator who has worked with hospitals, emergency medical service agencies, primary care practices, and researchers to develop measures of health care quality and achieve improvements in health care delivery and research.

Case Discussions: Examples of Implementation Science Frameworks in a Grant Proposal and Ongoing Study

  • Amy LeClair, PhD, MPhil: Study to evaluate the implementation of patient navigation to reduce disparities for women with breast cancer.
  • Alysse Wurcel, MD, MS: Proposal to develop, implement, and measure the impact of changes to the HIV testing polices at Tufts Medical Center to increase the number of people with substance use disorder who successfully receive HIV testing.

Who should attend

Any research faculty, especially early career faculty, are welcome to apply. Faculty with a draft grant proposal that contains an implementation science framework are strongly encouraged to attend (and may submit a copy of their proposal). Faculty experiencing challenges with an existing protocol are also encouraged to submit a summary of their protocol for feedback.

Registration

Space is limited to 12 participants. Apply here by Monday, June 22.

 

 

This workshop is provided free of charge, and is supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of health, Award Number UL1TR002544. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

Seminars & Workshops
Pfizer Investigator Training Program (iTP) Online

This unique, two-day, virtual (via Zoom), free-of-charge program will empower clinical researchers to build critical skills required for the recruitment, management, conduct, and reporting of clinical trials. It will examine the entire trial process, from planning stages to trial close-out activities, and will provide practical recommendations for increasing the efficiency of clinical trial conduct at investigative sites. This year’s program will also include a pediatric clinical research module.

Led by clinical trial experts, this interactive training will consist of didactic lectures and discussions. The iTP is targeted to investigators and the entire clinical study team, including research fellows, coordinators, research nurses, data managers, regulatory, and IRB members. Clinical trial experience (even if limited) is encouraged, though not required.

Learning modules will include:

  • The Drug Development Process
  • Study Start-Up
  • Conducting a Study
  • Study Oversight
  • Safety in Clinical Trials
  • Pediatric Clinical Research.

Attendees who complete the training will receive a Transcelerate GCP Certificate.

Details

Wednesday, November 4 and Thursday, November 5
2:00-5:00PM
via Zoom (login details will be sent to those who register).

To receive the Transcelerate GCP certificate, attendees are expected to:

  • Attend both sessions for the entire time.
  • Have a stable internet connection.
  • Keep their cameras on for the entire event.
  • Respond to polls and questions.

Registration

Registration for this event is now closed. 

Contact

Questions? Please email info@tuftsctsi.org for assistance.

CANCELLED
22nd Annual Clinical and Translational Science Graduate Program Symposium

CANCELLED

Due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, this event is cancelled for 2020. We regret any inconvenience this may cause, and look forward to hosting the Symposium in 2021.

 

Overview

The 22nd Annual Clinical and Translational Science (CTS) Graduate Program Symposium will be Friday, May 22, 8:00AM-1:00PM at Tufts Medical Center, Wolff Auditorium, 800 Washington Street, Boston, MA.

This year’s keynote speaker is Robert W. Yeh, MD, MSc, MBA, Director of the Richard A. and Susan F. Smith Center for Outcomes Research in Cardiology at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, and Associate Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School.

The event will also feature presentations and posters by students enrolled in the CTS Graduate Program, and the 2020 Clinical and Translational Science Poster Competition.

Schedule of Events

  • 7:30AM: Breakfast
  • 8:00AM: Welcome
  • 8:15AM: Presentations by Graduating Students
  • 9:45AM: Poster Session and 2020 Clinical and Translational Science Poster Competition
  • 10:15AM: Group Photo in Atrium, Main Lobby
  • 10:30AM: Presentations by Graduating Students
  • 11:45AM: Closing Remarks
  • 12:00PM: Keynote Lecture/Medical Grand Rounds
POSTPONED
A Paradigm Shift in Clinical Research and Education: The P-value Controversy and the End of Statistical Significance?

POSTPONED

Given guidance and recent reports related to the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19), this event has been postponed.

We hope to reschedule the symposium for later this year. As soon as new details are available, we will share them here.

We apologize for any inconvenience.

What does the p-value controversy mean for clinical research?

The deep controversy surrounding the use and misuse of p-values and statistical significance is evident in the decision by the American Statistical Association to issue a policy statement on the matter in 2016. The statement marked the first occasion the Association has taken a position on a specific matter of statistical practice since its founding in 1839.

This Tufts CTSI symposium, co-sponsored by the Tufts Data Intensive Studies Center (DISC),  aims to inform clinician researchers and statisticians regarding the principles covered in the statement as well as the controversy over the proper use and interpretation of the p-value. Distinguished panelists will speak on use of p-values from their multiple perspectives to reflect the landscape of opinions and provide guidance for investigators and educators going forward. They include scientists, statisticians, epidemiologists, and statistical advisors to prominent journals and policy organizations, with expertise in statistics, genetics, communication, nutrition, obesity, cardiovascular disease, and drug approval.

Learning objectives:

  • Understand the rationale behind the ASA statement that “No single index [i.e., p-value] should substitute for scientific reasoning.
  • Discuss the role that p-values have had on reproducibility and replication and the proposed remedies.
  • Apply alternative remedies for dealing with uncertainty in clinical research and education.


Panelists

John P.A. Ioannidis, MD, DSC

C.F. Rehnborg Chair in Disease Prevention and Professor at Stanford University
Author of “Why Most Published Research Findings are False,” accessed more than three million times. His recent JAMA viewpoint is subtitled “Do Not Abandon Significance.” Dr. Ioannidis has published nearly 1,000 papers and is one of the 10 most-cited scientists worldwide.

David Allison, PhD

Dean and Provost of the Indiana University School of Public Health
Author of “A Tragedy of Errors: Mistakes in Peer-reviewed Papers are Easy to Find but Hard to Fix, Report” and committee member of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine report, “Reproducibility and Replicability in Science.”

David Harrington, PhD

Professor of Biostatistics, Emeritus, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Co-Author of the 2019 New England Journal of Medicine article, “New Guidelines for Statistical Reporting in the Journal.” Dr. Harrington is also the principal investigator of the Statistical Coordinating Center for the Cancer Care Outcomes Research and Surveillance (CanCORS) Consortium and the project leader of the Biostatistics Core and Director of the Biostatistics Research Program in the Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center (DF/HCC).

Allen Schirm, PhD

Recently retired from Mathematica Policy Research
Co-Author of the 2019 The American Statistician editorial, “Moving to a World Beyond ‘p<0.05’.” He and Dr. Ron Wasserstein recently discussed their recommendations on statistical inference at the United States Conference on Teaching Statistics.

 

Details

Tuesday, April 7
8:30-11:30AM
Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging (HNRCA)
711 Washington Street, Boston, MA 02111

All are welcome to attend, especially:

  • Clinician researchers and investigators leading clinical trials.
  • Statisticians working with and educating clinical investigators.

Registration

Space is limited. Please register to attend.

 

About Tufts CTSI Events

Tufts CTSI’s Professional Education programs provide non-degree continuing education and training for clinical and translational research professionals from all Tufts CTSI partners and beyond.

Course enrollment priority is given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions. If your participation needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may provide their contact information when you register for the program.

This course is provided free of charge, and was supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of health, Award Number UL1TR002544.  The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

 

Conferences & Symposia
Breaking the Silence: Confronting Exclusion in Research

Read the Breaking the Silence Summary Report (PDF).

Watch the videos from Breaking the Silence (YouTube).

The goal of medicine and research should be that “all patients, of all backgrounds, get the care they need when they interface with our health care system” (Joyce Sackey, MD, Tufts University Associate Provost and Chief Diversity Officer).

Are we doing enough to reach this goal?

Join us for a meaningful evening of self-reflection, dialogue, and community-building, followed by a call to action around the issue of deeply-rooted biases that lead to exclusion in research.

The evening will begin with keynote speaker Camara Phyllis Jones, MD, MPH, PhD, past President of the American Public Health Association and Senior Fellow, Satcher Health Leadership Institute, Morehouse College. Dr. Jones is known for her contributions to critical race theory and her work in defining institutional racism, personally mediated racism, and internalized racism within the context of modern US race relations.

After that, we will enjoy a community dinner that will include facilitated roundtable discussions to further explore the themes from the keynote presentation and panel discussion. These dialogues will provide an opportunity for participants with diverse views and backgrounds to speak openly about exclusion in research to seek a better understanding of their own views, as well as the views and experiences of others.

Breaking the Silence: Confronting Exclusion in Research is the fourth symposium in the Breaking the Silence series launched in 2017. Tufts Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI) and the Institute of Clinical Research and Health Polices Studies (ICRHPS) are hosting this symposium, in collaboration with Tufts University School of Medicine and Tufts Medical Center.

Download and share the Breaking the Silence: Confronting Exclusion in Research flyer (PDF).

Details

Friday, March 6
5:15-8:00PM
Tufts Center for Medical Education
145 Harrison Avenue, Boston, MA 02111

Anyone interested in discussing the impact of bias on health is welcome to attend, especially members of the Tufts research community, Tufts University and Tufts Medical Center leadership and faculty, students, research participants, and community residents.

Registration

This event begins at 5:15PM and ends at 8:00PM. We hope attendees will plan to stay for the entirety of the event. If this is not feasible, please contact us at info@tuftsctsi.org.

Please register to attend by February 28.

Agenda

  • 5:00-5:15PM Registration
  • 5:15-5:20PM Welcome and Introductions
    Joyce Sackey, MD
  • 5:20-5:30PM Institutional Commitment to Diversity and Inclusion in Research
    Caroline Genco, PhD, MS
    Kara Greer, MA, PHR, SWP
  • 5:30-6:00PM Keynote Talk: How is Racism Operating Here? A Guide to Action
    Camara Phyllis Jones, MD, MPH, PhD
  • 6:00-6:20PM Panel Discussion
    Moderator: Linda Hudson, ScD, MSPH
    Camara Phyllis Jones, MD, MPH, PhD
    Sherry Reddix, MA, MPH
    Dawn Sauma, MSW, LICSW
  • 6:20-6:35PM Transition to Dinner and Dialogue
    Linda Hudson, ScD, MSPH
  • 6:35-7:50PM Dinner and Facilitated Dialogue
  • 7:50-7:55PM Where We Go from Here
    Jonathan Garlick, PhD, DDS
  • 7:55-8:00PM Closing Remarks
    Harry Selker, MD, MSPH

About Tufts CTSI Events

Tufts CTSI’s Professional Education programs provide non-degree continuing education and training for clinical and translational research professionals from all Tufts CTSI partners and beyond.

Course enrollment priority is given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions. If your participation needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may provide their contact information when you register for the program.

This course is provided free of charge, and was supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of health, Award Number UL1TR002544.  The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

 

Forum
Civic Science Roundtable: Dialogue on Diabetes Research

Are you living with diabetes? Or treating, researching, or supporting individuals with diabetes?

Join Tufts CTSI for a dialogue about disparities in diabetes research.

Our goal is to highlight the issue of disparities in the representation of minority groups in diabetes research. We will have a Structured Reflective Dialogue to build trust, transparency, and understanding.

Participants will:

  • Feel supported in expressing their values
  • Better understand the points of view of others
  • Gain confidence in making personal and collective choices to shape future discussions.

We want to hear your concerns, hopes, and personal experiences! Share your perspective and new ways to think about diabetes research.

Community leaders, patients, family members, researchers, research teams, clinicians, advocates, and others are welcome to attend.

Details

Civic Science Roundtable: Dialogue on Diabetes Research
Wednesday, February 5, 2020, 6:00-8:00PM
Roxbury Community College, 1234 Columbus Ave., Roxbury Crossing (in the main academic building, on the 5th floor)

Registration

To attend, please complete our registration form.

 

Seminars & Workshops
Dialogue Facilitation Training

Do you want to be a part of building a culture of communication?

Strong communication skills are important to support the academic and community-based work we do. That is why we are offering a training to teach participants how to facilitate and cultivate productive conversations.

You are cordially invited to a Dialogue Facilitation Training by Jonathan Garlick, DDS, PhD on Wednesday, January 22, 2020, 2:00-5:00PM at Tufts CTSI, 35 Kneeland St. 8th Floor Large Conference Room, Boston.

This interactive event will provide a general level of training to teach you the skills needed to facilitate a structured dialogue and improve communication.

The objectives of this training are to:

  • Promote open and inclusive dialogue
  • Teach participants to recognize how they can be a part of better conversations about potentially divisive issues
  • Encourage active listening and participation in dialogue.

*Complimentary refreshments will be provided.

Once you are trained, we have two upcoming opportunities for you to use your new facilitation skills:

  • Dialogue on Diabetes Research, February 5, 6:00-8:00PM at Roxbury Community College
    Pre-dialogue prep for facilitators: January 29, 4:00-5:00PM at 35 Kneeland St., 8th Floor Large Conference Room, Boston
  • Breaking the Silence Dialogue on Diversity in Research, March 6, 5:15pm-7:45PM on the Tufts Health Sciences Campus, Boston
    Pre-dialogue prep for facilitators: March 2, 4:00-5:00PM at 35 Kneeland St., 8th Floor Large Conference Room, Boston

Details

Dialogue Facilitation Training
Wednesday, January 22, 2:00-5:00PM
35 Kneeland Street, 8th Floor Conference Room, Boston

This event will provide an excellent opportunity for investigators and community members to network across the Tufts CTSI partnership to pursue collaborative translational research interests.

Registration

To attend, please complete our registration form.

 

Conferences & Symposia
6th Annual Asian Health Symposium: A Virtual Event Part 1

Finding Belonging Amidst Neighborhood Development: A Case for the Arts in Boston’s Chinatown

The Pao Arts Center uses arts, culture, and creativity to promote social cohesion and community well-being in an ethnic enclave, Boston’s Chinatown. In the same neighborhood, luxury development may be disrupting the community’s close-knit social fabric and sense of a coherent cultural identity.

A team comprised of Tufts University researchers, Pao Arts center staff, and community residents investigated whether the Pao Arts Center remedies the effects of this displacement. Preliminary findings from the research will be presented.

By the end of this session, participants should be able to:

  • Learn what the research team found about the effects of the Pao Arts Center
  • Understand more about how to do a collaborative, interdisciplinary, community-based research study.

Presenters

Peter Levine, Academic Dean and Lincoln Filene Professor of Citizenship & Public Affairs
Jonathan Tisch College of Civic Life, Tufts University

Cynthia Woo, Director
Pao Arts Center, Boston Chinatown Neighborhood Center (BCNC)

Discussant:
Giles Li, Senior Program Officer
Arts and Creativity, Barr Foundation

Details

Wednesday, October 7, 2020, noon-1:00PM

Online via Zoom (please register to receive the Zoom link and password).

Registration

All are welcome to attend. Please register here.

 

 

This event is provided free of charge, and was supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Award Number UL1TR002544. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

Conferences & Symposia
Translational Research Day 2020

Building Research Teams for Impact on Health: Spanning Disciplines and Stakeholders

Interested in learning how to build authentic partnerships for translational research collaboration? Mark your calendar for Translational Research Day 2020 on Friday, March 6 at the Tufts Health Sciences Campus in Boston.

Friday, March 6
8:30AM-3:30PM
Tufts Medical Center
Wolff Auditorium
800 Washington Street, Boston, MA 02111

Download and share the Translational Research Day 2020 flyer (PDF).

Watch the livestream on March 6 starting at 9:00AM EST!

Access the Translational Research Day slides here (PDF).

Registration

Please register to attend.

Keynote

The Grand Rounds keynote address will be given by Sharon Terry, MA, President and CEO of Genetic Alliance in Washington, DC. Ms. Terry is internationally known for her work on engaging individuals, families and communities to transform health and further biomedical research. She played a central role in identifying the gene for a rare disease affecting her two children.

Agenda

  • 8:30AM: Registration, breakfast, and digital poster session
  • 9:00AM:
  • 9:15AM: Taming the Wild Beast: Fueling the Power of Collaborative Innovation (Gigi Hirsh, MD, MIT Center for Biomedical Innovation)
    • NewDigs is a collaborative biomedical innovation platform that for the past 10 years has developed new methods for delivering value faster to key stakeholders. Dr. Hirsch will share her extensive experience gained in identifying and working with the value chain of decisionmakers, including the critical role of effective communication processes in sustaining collaboration. She will also discuss new tools that have emerged from these processes that drive value to stakeholders.
    • Moderator: Harry Selker, MD, MSPH, Tufts CTSI)
  • 9:45AM: Scientific Talks: Handbook of Broadly-Engaged Team Science
    • Anticipating the Growing Use of Real-World Data in Clinical Research (Kenneth Getz, MBA, Tufts Center for the Study of Drug Development)
      • Dr. Getz will discuss the shift towards the use of real-world data in the drug development and drug approval process. The use of real-world data in drug innovation and approval reflects the growing importance of obtaining insights directly from patients and their caregivers and others involved in patient care. Access to and use of real-world data requires a new level of collaboration and teamwork among multiple stakeholders, which is now occurring.
    • The Changing Role of Patient Advocates in Oncology Research (Susan Parsons, MD, MRP, Tufts Medical Center)
      • Dr. Parsons will draw on her extensive experience as a Principal Investigator on numerous studies of patient-centered cancer care and her key role in clinical trial development for the National Cancer Institute as a member of the NCI’s Scientific Steering Committee for Cancer Care Delivery an NCI-funded inter-group study of newly diagnosed patients with Hodgkin Lymphoma. Dr. Parsons will discuss the emerging role and importance of advocates in planning and conducting clinical trials as well as the challenges and benefits of integrated research teams.
    • Moderator: Jonathan Davis, MD, Tufts CTSI
  • 10:25AM: Break
  • 10:40AM: Panel: Authentic Engagement of Non-researchers in Team Science (Robert Sege, MD; Linda Hudson, PhD; Sara Folta, PhD, Tufts CTSI)
    • We will hear from three experts in community engagement in research. Dr. Hudson will discuss the value of partnering with communities, and the critical role of relationship-building, including how to engage and retain the interest of community stakeholders. Dr. Folta will draw upon an innovative theory to discuss principles of creating equity in research partnerships between scientists and community members. She will identify the six different types of capital non-scientist stakeholders bring to research and examples of how to achieve equity in these relationships. Dr. Sege will discuss his innovative work with community-based pediatric providers to achieve change in community-based clinical practices.
    • Moderator: Jonathan Garlick, DDS, PhD, Tufts CTSI
  • 11:25AM: Digital poster session, lunch, networking
  • 12:00PM: Keynote Address and Medical Grand Rounds
    • If You Are Not At the Table, You Are On the Menu: Building Research Teams for Impact on Health (Sharon Terry, MA, Genetic Alliance)
    • Moderator: Harry Selker, MD, MSPH, Tufts CTSI
  • 1:00PM: Travel to Dental Building, 14th Floor, for afternoon sessions
  • 1:15PM: 
    • Session A: Engaging Diverse Stakeholders in Basic Science Research (Jonathan Garlick, DDS, PhD, Tufts CTSI; Cheryl London, DVM, PhD, Tufts CTSI; Jens Rueter, MD, The Jackson Laboratory. Moderator: John Castellot, PhD, Tufts CTSI)
      • This groundbreaking session will involve presentations from three major basic scientists who have done pioneering work in diversification of research teams, demonstrating partnerships to advance research and leading to innovative approaches to research design and implementation. Dr. Garlick will discuss his transformation as a scientist researching scleroderma based on inclusion of patients in conceptualizing and implementing studies. He has since developed the Civic Communication curriculum, which engages scientists and all stakeholders in acquiring skills in authentic collaboration. Dr. London, a leader in the One Health initiative, will discuss the necessity and complexity of cross-species research and her new approaches that blend multi-team, multi-institutional resources to include mouse, dog and human models. Dr. Rueter from The Jackson Laboratory is leading a project at the other end of the translational spectrum — he is conducting implementation research community based health care providers. This is research on the use of genomic testing to improve the care of cancer patients in rural Maine. Dr. Rueter’s project is at a critical flexion point in scientific research—the translation from laboratory to widespread use. This project is using a collaborative model in which the lab is partnering with cancer care providers in local clinics to improve access to and use genomic testing by patients and their physicians in cancer care. The use of genomic testing in precision medicine is relatively new and integration into community use is challenging.
    • Session B: Innovative Broadly-Engaged Team Science Tools, Methods, and Frameworks (Peter Levine, PhD, Tufts University; Sarah Goff, MD, PhD, Baystate Medical Center; Kathleen Szegda, PhD, MPH, MS, Public Health Institute of Western Massachusetts; Denise H. Daudelin, RN, MPH, Tufts CTSI; Moderator: Robert Sege, MD, PhD, Tufts CTSI)
      • This session is a unique opportunity to hear from experts in community-based research and stakeholder engagement. Drs. Goff and Szegny have developed a training program for community leaders designed to model authentic partnerships in research. Additionally, they developed a training course, community-engaged research 101, focused on researchers and building relationships with communities. Drs. Goff and Szegny will talk about their training, giving examples of key concepts and approaches. Attendees will participate in a short exercise to demonstrate these ideas. Ms. Daudelin will discuss the Math Equipoise project, which was a large-scale project in which diverse stakeholders were involved in designing research to address the outcomes of osteoarthritis. This presentation will focus on the approaches used to create a patient and scientist integrated research team. Peter Levine has extensive experience developing partnerships for health improvement with members of social movements. Social movements such as ACT-UP have changed the course of scientific research; however, many researchers do not have knowledge of social movements or how to effectively engage with them. He will present a framework to assist researchers to engage effectively with social movements relevant to their research interests.
  • 3:00PM: Networking and refreshments (Alice Rushforth, PhD; Debra Lerner, MS, PhD, Tufts CTSI)

Poster Session

Present your translational research at our poster session!

Posters will be displayed electronically (on HD screens from ePosterBoards) from 8:30AM-noon. Previously presented posters are welcome. Learn more and submit your abstract by Friday, February 21. 

Get Social

Look for #TranslationalTufts2020 on social media and join the conversation.

 

Seminars & Workshops
Diversity in Research Topic Selection Workshop

Would you like to help to determine the topics and questions to be discussed at an upcoming forum on diversity in research?

Tufts CTSI, Tufts Medical Center, and Tufts University are hosting Breaking the Silence: Diversity in Research on Friday, March 6.

We need your help to develop prompting discussion questions for facilitators to use at this event.

We are looking for people with different values, opinions, and ideas to come together on Thursday, December 12 from noon-1:30PM for a workshop led by Jonathan Garlick, DDS, PhD. The goal of this workshop is to bring together members of the Tufts community to develop questions and topics to foster meaningful discussions that enrich and personalize the topic of diversity in research for all who attend Breaking the Silence.

This Topic Selection Workshop is an opportunity for you to help us jumpstart respectful dialogue, break down stereotypes, inspire curiosity, build empathy, and enable participants to link their health and well-being to their personal and civic responsibilities. To sign up, please register here.

What is Breaking the Silence?

Breaking the Silence is a symposium series developed by Tufts University Associate Provost and Chief Diversity Officer Joyce Sackey, MD. Previous topics include discrimination against Muslims; racism against black lives; and weight bias and health. March 6, 2020 is the fourth Breaking the Silence event, hosted by Tufts Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI), the Institute for Clinical Research and Health Policy Studies (ICRHPS), and Tufts University. This event will include a keynote speaker, a panel discussion, facilitated small-group discussions, and dinner. Details will be available soon.

What is a Topic Selection Workshop?

The Breaking the Silence event will include facilitated discussions to enrich the take-home messages from the keynote speaker and panel discussion. To do this, we must personalize the topic of diversity in research for all participants. The Topic Selection Workshop will bring together diverse voices to discuss, narrow down, and select questions that will be important and interesting to deliberate.

Who is leading the Topic Selection Workshop?

Jonathan Garlick, DDS, PhD, is Tufts CTSI’s Scientific Communications Program Director. He is also a stem cell researcher, a clinician, a professor of dental medicine, and Senior Fellow in Civic Science at Tufts University’s Tisch College of Civic Life. Dr. Garlick’s experience in supporting dialogue across Tufts will guide the question selection process.

The mission of Tufts CTSI’s Scientific Communications Program is to improve the public’s understanding of the purposes and value of clinical research and to build and maintain trust among diverse participants in the face of perceived risk, uncertainty, and conflicting beliefs, values, and interests. Tufts CTSI’s Scientific Communications Program and the Breaking the Science event are intended to foster respectful dialogue on contentious topics, break down stereotypes, inspire curiosity, build empathy, and enable participants to link their health and well-being to their personal and civic responsibilities.

How can I attend the Topic Selection Workshop?

The Diversity in Research Topic Selection Workshop is:

Thursday, December 12, noon-1:30PM
Dental Alumni Lounge
Tufts University School of Dental Medicine
1 Kneeland Street, 15th Floor
Boston

This event is in-person only. Lunch will be provided.

Space is limited! To reserve your seat, please register here by Tuesday, December 10.

 

 

This workshop is provided free of charge, and is supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of health, Award Number UL1TR002544. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

Conferences & Symposia
CTSA Shared Mentoring Workshop 2020

Agenda

  • 8:00-8:45AM: Working breakfast, networking, and registration
  • 8:45AM: Introductions
  • 9:00: Panel discussion, Getting to K and Beyond
  • 10:15: Break
  • 10:30: One-to-One Mentoring Session
  • 11:15: Exploring Career Opportunities in Translational Science

RSVP

To attend, please register here.

Details

CTSA Shared Mentoring Workshop
Friday, January 31, 8:00AM-noon
Tufts University School of Medicine, 145 Harrison Avenue, Room 114
Boston, MA 02111

This event is hosted by Tufts CTSI and co-sponsored by BU-CTSI, Harvard Catalyst and UMass CTSI.

Forum
Building Communities of Resilience: Substance Use Disorder

What does a community of resilience that supports people with substance use disorders (SUDs) look like, and how could we create it? Like other chronic diseases, SUDs can be managed, but not cured. Maintaining recovery can be a huge mental and physical task, and can be isolating.

Join us for this interactive discussion at a Museum of Science Forum about building communities of resilience around SUDs. Share your perspective as groups work together to create a community plan while learning about methods of prevention and recovery as well as considering a diverse range of values and ideas.

Featured speakers to be announced soon! Light refreshments will be provided.

This program was created in partnership with Tufts CTSI.

Details

Wednesday, November 20, 6:30-9:00PM

Museum of Science, Boston
Museum Of Science Driveway
Boston, MA 02114

Registration

Space is limited. Please register to attend this free event.

 

Please email forumrsvp@mos.org if you have any questions or concerns.

Seminars & Workshops
Research Database Creation: Building a REDCap Database

Overview

Are you involved in building a REDCap database for your research project?

REDCap is an online application that can be used to create research databases. It has many advantages over Excel, and is often the preferred tool for database creation. Learn how to create REDCap databases for your research projects in this 90-minute Tufts CTSI workshop, Research Database Creation: Building a REDCap Database.

This session will begin with a lecture presented by Rachael Huebner, a Clinical Data Manager at Tufts CTSI, followed by a workshop in which participants will practice building a simple database in REDCap.

To attend this event, participants must attend the first workshop in this series, Research Database Creation: Basics & Best Practices.

After attending this event, you should be able to:

  • Describe the differences between classic and longitudinal projects, and identify when to use each
  • Create projects, forms, and fields in REDCap
  • Export data from REDCap to Excel

Details

Date: Tuesday, November 12, 2:00-3:30PM

Location: Tufts Medical Center, IS Training Room, Ziskind Building, 1st Floor, Room 114A

To attend this event, participants must attend the first workshop in this series, Research Database Creation: Basics & Best Practices.

Registration

This workshop is designed for research assistants, clinical research coordinators, investigators, residents, and fellows who will be creating or working with databases for research projects.

Space is limited. To reserve your seat, please register here by October 24.

Tufts CTSI Professional Education & Expectation for Course Participants

Tufts CTSI’s Professional Education programs provide non-degree continuing education and training for clinical and translational research professionals from all Tufts CTSI partners and beyond.

Course enrollment priority is given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions. If your participation needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may provide their contact information when you register for the program.

This course is provided free of charge, and was supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of health, Award Number UL1TR002544. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

 

Seminars & Workshops
Research Database Creation: Basics and Best Practices

Overview

Are you involved in building a database for your research project?

Building an appropriate database for your study is critical to ensuring successful data collection and analysis. Learn how to build a database in this 90-minute Tufts CTSI workshop, Research Database Creation: Basics & Best Practices. This session will begin with an interactive lecture presented by Rachael Huebner, a Clinical Data Manager at Tufts CTSI, followed by a workshop in which participants will practice building a simple database in Excel.

This workshop is a prerequisite to a subsequent workshop, Research Database Creation: Building a REDCap Database.

After attending this event, you should be able to:

  • Recognize database creation best practices
  • Identify the clinical and demographic data needed to answer a study question
  • Effectively name and code variables
  • Create an Excel sheet appropriate for study data collection

Details

Date: Tuesday, October 29, 1:00-2:30PM

Location: Tufts Medical Center, IS Training Room, Ziskind Building, 1st Floor, Room 114A

This workshop is a prerequisite to a subsequent workshop, Research Database Creation: Building a REDCap Database.

Registration

This workshop is designed for research assistants, clinical research coordinators, investigators, residents, and fellows who will be creating or working with databases for research projects.

The workshop is now full. To add your name to the waitlist, please register here.

Tufts CTSI Professional Education & Expectation for Course Participants

Tufts CTSI’s Professional Education programs provide non-degree continuing education and training for clinical and translational research professionals from all Tufts CTSI partners and beyond.

Course enrollment priority is given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions. If your participation needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may provide their contact information when you register for the program.

This course is provided free of charge, and was supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of health, Award Number UL1TR002544. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

 

Conferences & Symposia
One Health Research Symposium Plus

Interested in optimizing the health of humans, animals, and the environment through an innovative and integrative, interdisciplinary approach to education, research, and practice?

Want to meet collaborators and develop grant proposals?

Join Tufts CTSI for One Health Symposium Plus on Monday, October 7 at Tufts University’s Health Sciences Campus in Boston. This interactive event will focus on new research project ideas with the goals of assisting teams to develop research project proposals for future grant submissions and engaging all event participants in team science approaches to further catalyze research ideas.

By the end of this interactive symposium, event participants will be able to:

  • Recognize how research teams develop research projects, from concept toward a written funding proposal.
  • Identify Tufts CTSI team-based translational science resources that can help advance a research project.
  • Articulate the value of gathering peer and expert feedback during the development of a fundable proposal.

Details

Monday, October 7, 2019, 9:00AM-1:00PM
Tufts University School of Dental Medicine, Room 1415 (14th floor)
1 Kneeland Street, Boston MA

Registration

To attend, please register here by October 2, 2019.

Agenda

  • 9:00AM: Registration
  • 9:30AM: Introduction
  • 10:00AM: The Urban Lead Burden in Humans, Animals, and Plants
    • Research team:
      • Ronnie Levin, MA, Visiting Scientist, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
      • Marieke Rosenbaum, DVM, MPH, MS, Research Assistant Professor, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University
      • Carolina L. Zilli Viera, PhD, Research Fellow, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
  • 10:30AM: CAAN: Canines for Autism Activity and Nutrition
    • Research team:
      • Deborah Linder, DVM, DACVN, MS, Research Assistant Professor, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University
      • Christina Mule, PhD, Pediatric Psychologist, Tufts Medical Center; Assistant Professor, Tufts University School of Medicine
      • Aviva Must, PhD, Chair of Public Health and Community Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine
      • Sara Folta, PhD, Associate Professor, The Friedman School of Nutrition and Science Policy, Tufts University
      • Sean Cash, PhD, Associate Professor, The Friedman School of Nutrition and Science Policy, Tufts University
  • 11:00AM: Introduction to Breakout Sessions
  • 11:15AM: Lunch
  • 11:30AM: Working Lunch: Breakout Groups
    • Levin, Dental 1415
    • Linder, Dental 1414
  • 12:45PM: Debrief Breakout Sessions, Next Steps, Evaluations, & Adjourn
Conferences & Symposia
Team Science Summit: Innovations in Alzheimer’s and Neurodegenerative Disease Research

 

Are you a clinician or a researcher working to understand, treat, or prevent Alzheimer’s disease or cognitive disorders associated with aging?

Tufts CTSI, together with The Jackson Laboratory (JAX), is hosting a Team Science Summit: Innovations in Alzheimer’s and Healthy Aging Research on Wednesday, September 18, 8:00AM-3:30PM, at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging (711 Washington Street, Boston).

This event will bring together researchers and clinicians from across Tufts University and Tufts CTSI partners to explore opportunities for multidisciplinary collaborations focused on neurodegenerative disease (Alzheimer’s, other dementias) and healthy aging research. Presentations will focus on ongoing work to interrogate mechanisms of disease evolution, build novel disease models and translational tools, and enable biomarker- driven precision medicine approaches for care and disease prevention.

We encourage clinicians and researchers with an interest in forming new collaborative research projects, including postdocs, to register and attend this full-day event consisting of panel discussions, poster presentations, and networking opportunities.

Details

Wednesday, September 18
8:00AM-3:30PM
Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging
711 Washington Street, Boston

Registration

Please register here.

Agenda

  • 8:00AM: Registration and Breakfast
  • 8:30AM: Welcome and Opening Remarks
    • Welcome, Alice Rushforth, PhD, Tufts CTSI
    • The Jackson Laboratory Overview, Susie Airhart, JAX
    • Charge for the Day, Cheryl London, DVM, PhD, DACVIM, Tufts CTSI
  • 9:00AM: Novel Mechanistic Insights into Neurodegenerative Processes
    • Disorders of the Nervous System and Neurodegeneration, Philip Haydon, PhD, Tufts University School of Medicine
    • Precision Mouse Models of Human Disease: Mechanisms Linking Translation and Axon Degeneration, Robert Burgess, PhD, JAX
    • Neurovascular Mechanisms of Neurodegeneration,Tina Chabrashvili, MD, PhD, Tufts Medical Center
    • Brain Injury, Metabolism, and Alzheimer’s Disease, Chris Dulla, PhD, Tufts University School of Medicine
    • Moderated discussion
  • 10:30AM: Break
  • 10:45AM: Models and Experimental Strategies: Toward Precision Understanding
    • Multi-Omic Analysis Identifies Transcriptional Networks and Drivers Associated with Cognitive Aging and Alzheimer’s Disease, Catherine Kaczorowski, PhD, JAX
    • Modeling Alzheimer’s Disease with Human iPSC-Derived Brain Tissues, Giuseppina Tesco, MD, PhD, Tufts University
    • Translational Data Science for Alzheimer’s Disease Research, Gregory Carter, PhD, JAX
    • Targeting Alzheimer’s Susceptibility Factors with Peptide Aptamers, Benjamin Harrison, PhD, University of New England
    • Moderated Discussion
  • 12:15PM: Lunch, Poster Session, & Networking
  • 1:15PM: Nutrition, Healthy Aging, and Alzheimer’s Disease
    • More Than Memory Loss: Using Advanced Mouse Models to Investigate Non-Cognitive Symptoms of Alzheimer’s Disease, Kristen O’Connell, PhD, JAX
    • Individual Nutrients and the Risk of Alzheimer’s Disease, Paul Jacques, DSc, Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging
    • The Jackson Laboratory Nathan Shock Center Resources for the Aging Research Community, Ron Korstanje, PhD, JAX
    • The Role of Polyphenols in Healthy Aging, Barbara Shukitt-Hale, PhD, Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging
    • Context & Community in Alzheimer’s Disease Research, Tom Meuser, PhD, Center for Excellence in Aging & Health (CEAH) at University of New England
    • Alzheimer’s Disease Research at a Rural Psychiatric Hospital in Maine: Strategies for Clinical Trials and Translational Research in an Unlikely Setting, Cliff Singer, MD, DFAPA, AGSF, Northern Light Health
    • Moderated Discussion 
  • 3:00PM: Wrap Up
Seminars & Workshops
Training for New Mentors, Fall 2019

Tufts CTSI offers Mentor Training for individuals who mentor junior faculty in research. These interactive, two-hour sessions are funded by Tufts CTSI.

This session is for faculty members who recently obtained their first funding who are mentoring individuals at the fellow or junior faculty level.

Registration

Admission to the training is by application only. Please apply here by Monday, October 21.

Facilitators

  • Karen Freund, MD, MPH, Professor and Vice Chair of Medicine, Tufts Medical Center; Professor of Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine; Harry and Elsa Jiler Clinical Research Professor, American Cancer Society
  • Jill Maron, MD. MPH, Executive Director, Mother Infant Research Institute; Vice Chair of Pediatric Research, Floating Hospital for Children; Associate Professor, Tufts University School of Medicine

Details

Training for New and Recent Mentors
Thursday, October 31, 3:00-5:00PM
8th Floor, 35 Kneeland Street, Boston

 

Seminars & Workshops
Training for Experienced Mentors, Fall 2019

Tufts CTSI offers Mentor Training for individuals who mentor junior faculty in research. These interactive, two-hour sessions are funded by Tufts CTSI.

This session is for faculty members with more than five years of experience mentoring junior faculty.

Registration

Admission to the training is by application only. Please apply here by Monday, September 16.

Facilitators

  • Gordon Huggins, MD, Director, Molecular Cardiology Research Institute (MCRI) Center for Translational Pharmacology and Genomics, Tufts Medical Center; Associate Professor, Tufts University School of Medicine
  • Sawkat Anwer, DMVH, PhD, Distinguished Professor and Associate Dean for Research, Tufts University Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine; Professor of Biomedical Sciences, Tufts University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences

Details

Training for Experienced Mentors
Tuesday, September 24, 3:00-5:00PM
8th Floor, 35 Kneeland Street, Boston

 

Seminars & Workshops
Scientific Manuscript Writing Workshops 2019

Overview

Ready to transform your research into a manuscript suitable for a peer-reviewed publication?

Find out what editors want and gain confidence in your writing at this fall’s Scientific Manuscript Writing Workshop.

This four-session workshop will review the process of constructing scientific papers that are logically organized, concisely written, and attentive to reader and reviewer expectations.

You will prepare and present the main sections of a research paper in the IMRAD (introduction, methods, results, and discussion) format, and will receive constructive critiques and written comments. By the end of the sessions, you will have a more polished draft that can stand up to rigorous peer review.

The workshop will be led by Robert J. Goldberg, PhD, a senior researcher who brings with him a wealth of writing and submission expertise from many years as a mentor, journal editor, and medical school writing course director.

Dates and Location

All sessions will take place at Tufts CTSI, 35 Kneeland Street, 8th Floor, Boston, on Mondays from 10:15AM-11:45AM.
  • Session I (Monday, October 21): Effective Scientific Writing & Review of Examples
  • Session II (Monday, November 4): Group Review: Introduction
  • Session III (Monday, November 18): Group Review: Methods/Results
  • Session IV (Monday, December 2): Group Review: Discussion
  • Optional one-on-one request for feedback

Registration and Requirements

Any post-graduate clinical, health services, or public health investigators who have original research intended for publication and peer feedback for writing support are welcome to apply.

Participants are required to attend all four workshop sessions.

Register here by Wednesday, October 16. Remote participation may be available.

Registration is on a first come, first served, basis and priority is given to members of Tufts CTSI partner institutions. Once the course is full, additional registrants will be put on a waitlist and invited to the next opportunity. We will confirm your enrollment as soon we finalize the registration list.

Enrolled seats will be prioritized to faculty members who commit to attending and completing all assigned prework. You do not have to have actual study results or references ready to get the essential work done, but this course can benefit those who already have some elements of a work in progress on the introduction, methods, or results section of a paper.

To facilitate effective peer review experiences, we prioritize manuscripts addressing original scientific projects in the areas of clinical and public health research. Class attendance is critical to this peer review-based format. You will be expected to provide thoughtful reviews of attendees drafts and actively engage in classroom discussion. We ask participants to come open-minded and show positive responses to constructive feedback.

This course is not intended for basic science researchers. Basic science researchers seeking individualized feedback on their manuscript are encouraged to submit a service request at https://informatics.tuftsctsi.org/pims/request.htm

Details

Learning Objectives

By the end of this workshop series, you will be able to:
  • Discuss the core components of a successful scientific manuscript
  • Identify strategies and next steps for completing a full manuscript for peer review submission
  • Anticipate reviewers’ concerns in discussing and presenting your research in writing and how to best respond to those concerns

Workshop Faculty

  • Main instructor: Robert J. Goldberg, PhD, Professor, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Department of Quantitative Health Sciences
  • Guest instructor: Nicholas Moustakas, MA, Research Development Specialist, Tufts CTSI

Course Participation

By enrolling in this course, you are agreeing to complete all pre-work assignments, including submitting your draft of the assigned section by the Wednesday prior to peer reviews, and preparing thoughtful comments on colleagues’ drafts for discussion during the session.

Pre-work Deadlines

  • Monday, October 21, Session 1
    • Readings:
      • Welch HG (1999) Preparing manuscripts for submission to medical journals: the paper trail. Eff Clin Pract 2:131–137
      • Example article for critical review: To be emailed ahead of time
      • Example article for critical review: To be emailed ahead of time
  • Wednesday, October 30
    • Submit your Introduction section (1 or 1 ¼ pages OR three paragraphs; double-spaced)
  • Monday, November 4, Session 2
    • Review/prepare comments for peers’ drafts
  • Wednesday, November 13
    • Submit your Methods and Results sections (3-5 pages + up to 3-5 figures, include subheadings; double-spaced)
  • Monday, November 18, Session 3
    • Review/prepare comments for peers’ drafts
  • Wednesday, November 27
    • Submit your Discussion section (3-4 pages, include subheadings; double-spaced)
  • Monday, December 2, Session 4
    • Review/prepare comments for peers’ drafts

Tufts CTSI Professional Education & Expectations for Course Participants

Tufts CTSI’s Professional Education programs provide non-degree continuing education and training for clinical and translational research professionals from all Tufts CTSI partners and beyond.

Course enrollment priority is given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions. If your participation needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may provide their contact information when you register for the program.

This course is provided free of charge and is supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Award Number UL1TR002544.  The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

 

Information Session
Pilot Studies Program Information Webinar

Do you have an idea for an innovative, high-impact, translational research project? Tufts CTSI is funding grants of up to $60,000 for scientists and scholars at CTSI-affiliated institutions. Selected projects will be funded for one year, beginning May 1, 2020.

Have questions about the application process? Join us for this online Info Session. To participate, email pilots@tuftsctsi.org or access the WebEx session here.

Applications for the Pilot Studies Program are due by Friday, September 27.

Information Session
Pilot Studies Program Information Webinar

Do you have an idea for an innovative, high-impact, translational research project? Tufts CTSI is funding grants of up to $60,000 for scientists and scholars at CTSI-affiliated institutions. Selected projects will be funded for one year, beginning May 1, 2020.

Have questions about the application process? Join us for this online Info Session. To participate, email pilots@tuftsctsi.org.

Applications for the Pilot Studies Program are due by Friday, September 27.

Seminars & Workshops
Scientific Grant Writing Workshops: Page One

Overview

Planning to submit a scientific research grant proposal in early 2020? Need useful feedback on your research objectives?

Tufts CTSI invites 10-15 motivated researchers with developed biomedical, clinical,or translational research project ideas to sign up for Developing Your Page One: a Writing Workshop Series for Researchers. This popular four-session grant writing course is designed to help you develop the critically-important Page One (or Specific Aims) section of your grant proposals through peer review, grantsmanship training, and expert support. You will receive feedback and revise your Page One three times during the program.

By the end of the series, you should be able to:

  • Apply strategies for developing clear and compelling specific aims
  • Practice constructive and effective peer review
  • Explain the importance of aligning your Page One with the funding agency’s mission and priorities, and of adapting it for reviewers’ areas of expertise
  • Describe the NIH-style grant submission process.

The workshops will be facilitated by Susan Lewis, Associate Director of Tufts University’s Office of Research Development (ORD), and Anna Dalby, Research Development Specialist, Tufts ORD.

Details

All sessions are scheduled for 9:30-11:00AM, except the final session. Session 4 is three hours long and begins at 9AM.

  • Session 1 (Thursday, October 10, 2019): Overview of Page One and Funding Agencies
  • Session 2 (Thursday, October 17, 2019): Peer Review, Round 1
  • Session 3 (Thursday, October 24, 2019): Clarity, Concision, and Coherence in Writing
  • Session 4 (Thursday, October 31, 2019; 9AM-noon): Peer Review, Round 2, Next Steps

All sessions will take place at Tufts CTSI, 35 Kneeland Street, 8th Floor, Boston.

Participants must attend all four sessions and must submit a draft of their Page One by September 26, 2019.

Registration

Apply here by September 26, 2019.

The timeline of this program may best serve researchers targeting a proposal submission in early 2020; however, anyone currently writing aims for NIH or a similar grant is welcome to apply.

Priority will be given to faculty from Tufts CTSI partner and collaborator institutions. Once the course is full, additional applicants will be put on a waitlist. We will confirm your enrollment as soon as we finalize the registration list.

Still formulating a research concept? Need some advice? Submit a service request here.

Tufts CTSI Professional Education & Expectation for Course Participants

Tufts CTSI’s Professional Education programs provide non-degree continuing education and training for clinical and translational research professionals from all Tufts CTSI partners and beyond.

Course enrollment priority is given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions. If your participation needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may provide their contact information when you register for the program.

This course is provided free of charge, and was supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of health, Award Number UL1TR002544. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

 

Seminars & Workshops
Health Research at Tufts: Stakeholder Orientation

Overview

Are you curious about how nutrition research is done at Tufts? Interested in finding new ways to participate and contribute throughout the research process?

Join us for an engaging and hands-on event at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging (HNRCA) at Tufts University to help demystify the research process! Learn about how research moves from idea to impact on health. Through group discussion and hands-on experiences of basic science labs, we are opening the doors to some of the Tufts health research facilities to find out how community members can work with researchers to address health research. The workshop will consist of:

  1. An overview ofthe research process
  2. A discussion of how Tufts CTSI is engaging with the community throughout the research process
  3. Visiting labs where clinical research is conducted

Details

Monday, June 3, 2019, 2:00-5:00PM
Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging (HNRCA)
711 Washington Street, Boston MA, 02111
Mezzanine Conference Room

In order to participate fully in the tours, please plan to attend for the entire event from 2:00-5:00PM.

Registration

This event is open to all, including individuals and members of community organizations who are interested in learning more about how health research is conducted, and in meaningful partnerships between the community and academia. Space is limited. Please register here by May 29.

Schedule of Events

Tufts CTSI Professional Education & Expectation for Course Participants

Tufts CTSI’s Professional Education programs provide non-degree continuing education and training for clinical and translational research professionals from all Tufts CTSI partners and beyond.

Course enrollment priority is given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions. If your participation needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may provide their contact information when you register for the program.

This course is provided free of charge, and was supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of health, Award Number UL1TR002544. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

 

Seminars & Workshops
The Odyssey of OHDSI: Using Health Care Data for Research

How can we use health care data to generate reproducible scientific evidence or reliable clinical predictions? What innovative tools are available to allow us to efficiently work with our own data and in collaboration with others?

Join Tufts CTSI on May 6-8 at The Odyssey of OHDSI: Using Health Care Data for Research on the Tufts Health Sciences Campus in Boston to find out!

Observational Health Data Sciences and Informatics (OHDSI, pronounced Odyssey) is a rapidly expanding multi-sector research collaborative dedicated to uncovering the value of health data through large-scale analytics. The OHDSI community includes dozens of academic, corporate, and governmental institutions that use health data for research in the US and around the world. The community conducts methods research to identify best practices and builds state-of-the-art open source tools that implement those methods.

This exciting three-day workshop led by principal developers Marc Suchard, MD, PhD, University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA); Martijn Schuemie, PhD, and Jenna Reps, PhD, Janssen Research and Development, will teach you how to use OHDSI tools on data that conforms to the OHDSI community’s OMOP Common Data Model (CDM). In addition to implementing best practices, these tools are designed to simplify research processes by eliminating data wrangling and standardizing the parts of complex multistep processes that don’t require thoughtful consideration while informing many parts that do.

Day one will briefly cover OHDSI and how it supports research. Most of the day will cover how data are represented by vocabularies in the OMOP CDM and how to use the ATLAS toolset to define cohorts. Day two will give researchers, statisticians, and data analysts a hands-on introduction to using either of the two most mature OHDSI analytic tool sets. These will be taught in two tracks. The first will cover tools for population-level effect estimation. The second will cover tools for developing patient-level prediction models. Day three will guide participants through every step of conducting a study using the methods and tools covered in Day 2. Each session will build incrementally on the last so participants in later sessions will benefit most if they understand material covered in earlier sessions.

This will be a highly practical, hands-on training, perfect for any researcher, statistician, analyst, methodology specialists, or staff who uses health care data for research. Attendees should have basic R experience and understanding of observational data, as well as prior experience analyzing observational data such as electronic health records, before attending this session, and are encouraged to attend all three sessions.

Course Faculty

  • Christian Reich, MD, PhD
    VP Real World Analytics Solutions, IQVIA
  • Jenna Reps, PhD
    Senior Epidemiology Informaticist, Janssen research and Development
  • Martijn Schuemie, PhD
    Director, Epidemiology Analytics, Janssen Research and Development
  • Anthony Sena
    Associate Director of Epidemiology Analytics, Janssen Research and Development
  • Marc Suchard, MD, PhD
    Professor, Department of Biomathematics, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles

Learning Objectives

After completing this workshop series, you should be able to:

  • Relate key OMOP CDM and vocabulary principles to PHDSI’s standardization process
  • Define cohorts, conduct cohort studies, or develop patient-level prediction models using OHDSI tools
  • Identify and access educational and other resources needed to become more fully proficient at using these tools in your research work.

After completing Day 1, you should be able to:

  • Navigate OMOP CDM and vocabularies to define populations and outcomes.
  • Discuss the structure of the OMOP CDM and how the OHDSI community uses it to support observational research.

After completing Day 2, you should be able to:

  • Track 1:
    • Demonstrate how OHDSI tools can be utilized to design and implement a comparative cohort study in observational healthcare data
  • Track 2:
    • Describe the patient-level prediction model process
    • Develop models using the OHDSI Patient-Level Prediction framework
    • Identify key elements to develop and validate prediction models using the OHDSI tools.

After completing Day 3, you should be able to:

  • Discuss basic study design and statistical concepts and procedures

Details

Monday, May 6, 2019, 10:00AM-5:00PM

OMOP-CDM, Vocabulary, Cohort Definitions
Tufts University School of Dental Medicine, Rachel’s Auditorium, 14th Floor
1 Kneeland Street, Boston

Tuesday, May 7, 2019, 9:00AM-5:00PM

Track 1: Population-level Effect Estimation (Cohort Method)
Tufts University School of Dental Medicine, Dental Board Room 1533, 15th Floor
1 Kneeland Street, Boston

Track 2: Patient-level Prediction
Tufts University School of Dental Medicine, Rachel’s Auditorium, 14th Floor
1 Kneeland Street, Boston

Wednesday, May 8, 2019, 9:00AM-5:00PM

OHDSI Tools and Hands-On Your Data
Tufts Center for Medical Education, Room 216A, 2nd Floor
145 Harrison Avenue, Boston

Registration

This workshop is intended for people who want to learn how health data are represented using OHDSI’s data standards and those who want to use OHDSI tools to define research cohorts, conduct cohort studies, or develop patient-level prediction models using OHDSI tools. The series is perfect for any researcher, statistician, analyst, methodology specialists, or staff who uses health care data for research.

Each session will incrementally build on the skills gained in the previous session(s). Though not a prerequisite, participants who have attended or already understand the material covered in previous sessions will gain the most from subsequent sessions.

To reserve your space, please register here by April 29.

 

Tufts CTSI Professional Education & Expectation for Course Participants

Tufts CTSI’s Professional Education programs provide non-degree continuing education and training for clinical and translational research professionals from all Tufts CTSI partners and beyond.

Course enrollment priority is given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions. If your participation needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may provide their contact information when you register for the program.

This course is provided free of charge, and was supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of health, Award Number UL1TR002544. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

Seminars & Workshops
Advancing Good Patient Recruitment Practice in Clinical Trials, featuring Industry Experts from BBK Worldwide

We know you know.

Study after study shows that recruiting and retaining study participants is one of the weakest links in clinical research.

Energize yourself with this interactive 60-minute seminar and learn how to adopt a patient-centric mindset for clinical research. Understanding the principles and standards that guide the recruitment, enrollment, and retention of patients in clinical trials is critical to success. As long as research teams focus on what specific tactics will break through the wall of difficult recruitment, this problem will persist. For 95% of studies, solving this enrollment problem is well within reach once we focus on the why instead of the what.

Join our guest presenters from BBK Worldwide, Bonnie A. Brescia, Founding Principal and Corporate Development Officer, and Aaron Fleishman, Director of Market Development, for the first of three sessions that focus on how patient experience drives successful patient recruitment, engagement, and retention.

Participation in every session in the series is not necessary; attendees will gain insights and techniques to advance their thinking, build skills, and improve performance in patient recruitment in each session. Subsequent events will drill down into the key concepts presented in this initial event.

For 35 years BBK Worldwide, The Patient Experience Company, has been at the forefront of the patient recruitment industry. Backed by efficacy data and market research, BBK is redefining what it means to be patient-centric within the clinical research industry by educating consumers, engaging participants, and unburdening sites. To learn more about BBK Worldwide visit www.bbkworldwide.com.

Learning Objectives

After attending this event, participants should be able to do the following on their own:

  • Apply six key principles of patient recruitment to any clinical study
  • Analyze a protocol from a recruitment perspective
  • Consider metrics and mechanisms for reporting on recruitment, engagement, and retention
  • Assess recruitment plans as “living documents”

Details

Wednesday, April 24, 2019, 3:00-4:00PM
Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Room 114, 145 Harrison Avenue, Boston MA

During this 60-minute session, BBK will combine a formal presentation with group exercises, and Q&A time. Upon registration, participants will receive a mock protocol synopsis for a quick review prior to the session. This protocol will be used during the exercise portion of the session.

Registration

This seminar is ideal for professionals involved in all aspects of clinical research (whether academic-, industry-, or government-sponsored) and regardless of therapeutic area, large or small molecules, devices or diagnostics, rare or common conditions.

Tufts CTSI and Tufts network partner organizations:

  • Program management and research teams
  • Principal investigators
  • Study coordinators
  • Medicine and life sciences students
  • IRB administrators

Intermediate Level: appropriate for individuals who already have a basic understanding of why and how clinical trials are conducted.

To reserve your space, please register here.

 

Tufts CTSI Professional Education & Expectation for Course Participants

Tufts CTSI’s Professional Education programs provide non-degree continuing education and training for clinical and translational research professionals from all Tufts CTSI partners and beyond.

Course enrollment priority is given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions. If your participation needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may provide their contact information when you register for the program.

This course is provided free of charge, and was supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of health, Award Number UL1TR002544. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

Seminars & Workshops
Brown Bag Lunch: Developing Recruitment and Retention Plans

Need guidance on developing your recruitment and retention plan?

Join us for an hour-long workshop, Developing Recruitment and Retention Plans. This session will take place during lunch hour, so please feel free to bring your lunch.

Recruitment and retention are critical to the success of a research study; however, generating a plan that considers cost, target audience, best practices, and retention of participants can be challenging during the study development phase of research. This workshop, led by Sara Folta, PhD, Director of Integrating Underrepresented Populations in Research and C. Phillip Oettgen, Project Manager of the Recruitment and Retention Support Unit (RRSU) seeks to raise awareness about the key elements and major considerations of a recruitment and retention plan.

After attending this event, participants should be able to do the following on their own:

  • Describe how to set realistic recruitment goals for research studies
  • Explain how to identify and best reach different target audiences, including underrepresented populations
  • Recognize realistic expectations and knowledge of resources
  • Discuss challenges to retention and key strategies to improve it.

Details

Thursday, March 14, noon-1:00PM
Tufts CTSI, 35 Kneeland Street, 8th Floor Conference Room
Boston MA

Registration

This program is open to research coordinators and investigators in clinical and non-clinical fields. Any research team members interested in recruitment and retention are welcome.

To attend, please register here.

Tufts CTSI Professional Education & Expectation for Course Participants

Tufts CTSI’s Professional Education programs provide non-degree continuing education and training for clinical and translational research professionals from all Tufts CTSI partners and beyond.

Course enrollment priority is given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions. If your participation needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may provide their contact information when you register for the program.

This course is provided free of charge, and was supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of health, Award Number UL1TR002544. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

Conferences & Symposia
21st Annual Clinical and Translational Science Graduate Program Symposium

Overview

The 21st Annual Clinical and Translational Science (CTS) Graduate Program Symposium will be Friday, May 3, 8:30AM-1:00PM at Tufts University School of Medicine, 145 Harrison Avenue, Room 114, Boston, MA.

This year’s keynote speaker is Derek C. Angus, MD, MPH, FRCP, Distinguished Professor and Michael P. Fink Endowed Chair, Department of Critical Care Medicine, University of Pittsburgh and UPMC Health System. He is also an Associate Editor of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA).

The event will also feature presentations and posters by students enrolled in the CTS Graduate Program, and the 2019 Clinical and Translational Science Poster Competition.

Schedule of Events

  • 8:30AM: Breakfast
  • 9:00AM: Welcome
  • 9:15AM: Poster Viewing and Moderated Poster Talks
    • Guarav Gulati, MD
    • Anna Meader, MD
    • Xi Qian, PhD
    • Bethany Roehm, MD
  • 10:15AM: Photo Opportunity for Students and Faculty
  • 10:30AM: 2019 Clinical and Translational Science Poster Competition – Winner’s Presentation
  • 10:45AM: Presentations by Graduating Students
    • Wendy McCallum, MD, MS
    • Natalia Olchanski, MS, PhD Candidate
  • 11:15AM: Closing Remarks
  • 12:00PM: Keynote Lecture/Medical Grand Rounds in Tufts Medical Center’s Wolff Auditorium
Seminars & Workshops
Plain Language for Health 2019

Plain Language for Health: Writing and Design for Health Research and Practice is for motivated individuals and teams working to communicate health information in ways people can understand.

The two-day workshop on Thursday, March 28 and Friday, March 29, 9:00AM-4:00PM, features training with health literacy and plain language experts from Tufts University School of Medicine and the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, and an evening networking reception sponsored by CommunicateHealth.

Speakers from Tufts Clinical and Translational Science Institute at Tufts Medical Center (CTSI) and Multi-Regional Clinical Trials Center of Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard (MRCT) will lead interactive discussions on how to apply principles of health literacy and plain language to health research and informed consent. The workshop will teach actionable skills and techniques to improve community engagement, build transparency and trust, and connect with patients, research participants, and the community.

Presenting Sponsors

  • Tufts CTSI, accelerating the translation of research into clinical use, medical practice, and impact on health
  • Public Health and Community  Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine (TUSM), preparing health professionals to eliminate health inequities, reduce the burden of disease and injury, promote mental and physical health, and prevent global threats to the environment

Contributing Sponsors

  • Multi-Regional Clinical Trials Center (MRCT), engages diverse stakeholders to define emerging issues in global clinical trials and creates ethical and actionable solutions
  • CommunicateHealth, award-winning communications firm specializing in health behavior change
  • Tufts Health Literacy Leadership Institute (HLLI), internationally known for health literacy professional development and leadership to eliminate health disparities and improve population health

 

Conferences & Symposia
Addiction Research Symposium Plus

Interested in addiction research? Want to meet collaborators and develop grant proposals?

Join Tufts CTSI for our Addiction Research Symposium Plus on Wednesday, March 13 at Tufts University’s Boston Health Sciences Campus. This interactive event will focus on nascent research projects with the goals of assisting teams to develop research project proposals for future grant submissions and engaging all event participants in team science approaches to further catalyze research ideas.

By the end of this interactive symposium, event participants should be able to:

  • Identify common regulatory concerns surrounding the unique populations involved in addiction research.
  • Recognize how research teams develop research projects, from concept toward a written funding proposal.
  • Identify Tufts CTSI team-based translational science resources that can help advance a research project.
  • Articulate the value of gathering peer and expert feedback during the development of fundable proposal.

Selected Proposals

The following projects will be presented and discussed:

  • Oxygenating the Addicted Brain Through Aerobic Exercise, Eduardo Fontes, PhD, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte and Tufts University School of Arts and Sciences
  • Incorporating Acupuncture into the Continuum of Care for People with Severe Opioid Use Disorder, Barbara Herbert, MD, Column Health and Tufts University School of Medicine
  • Intranasal Glial-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (GDNF) Gene Therapy for Opioid Use Disorder, Barbara Waszczak, PhD, Northeastern University Bouve College of Health Sciences; Emmanuel Pothos, PhD, Tufts University School of Medicine
  • Salivary Gene Analysis and Brain MRI to Understand Hypothalamic and Reward Pathway Dysregulation Affecting Oral Feeding in Infants with Neonatal Opioid Withdrawal Syndrome, Elizabeth Yen, MD; Jill Maron, MD, and Jonathan Davis, MD, Tufts Medical Center Pediatrics Department

Details

Wednesday, March 13, 9:00AM-3:00PM
Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Room 216A
145 Harrison Avenue, Boston MA

Registration

To attend, please register here by March 4, 2019.

Conferences & Symposia
5th Annual Asian Health Symposium

Moving Forward, Looking Back: Using Research to Improve Community Health

Interested in hearing the results of research conducted in Boston’s Chinatown/Asian communities? Wondering what’s next?

Join Tufts CTSI and  the Addressing Disparities in Asian Populations through Translational Research (ADAPT) Program for the 5th Annual Asian Health Symposium, Moving Forward, Looking Back: Using Research to Improve Community Health. This half-day event will inform participants about research taking place in and around Chinatown. See how academic/community collaborations fueled research and the findings that resulted from that work. Attendees will hear presentations on recent and ongoing studies focused on overlooked health issues or understudied areas, discuss potential next steps, and brainstorm how to further increase community engagement in research.

Researchers and community members are encouraged to attend this exciting event.

After attending this event, participants should be able to:

  • Identify several exciting research projects completed in Boston Chinatown/Asian Communities in the past five years.
  • Describe the key findings/takeaways from these research projects.
  • Recognize the value of increased community engagement and collaboration with research in your community.

Details

Tuesday, April 23, 2019, 9:30AM-1:30PM
Tufts University School of Dental Medicine, Rachel’s Auditorium, Room 1414 (14th Floor)
1 Kneeland Street, Boston MA

Registration

Researchers and community members are encouraged to attend.

Space is limited! Please register here by April 15.

Agenda

  • 9:00AM: Registration and Breakfast
  • 9:30AM: Welcome Remarks
  • 9:40AM: Opening Remarks
    • Carolyn Rubin, ADAPT Director
    • Dawn Sauma, ADAPT Co-Chair; Co-Executive Director, Asian Task Force Against Domestic Violence (ATASK)
    • Ed Flynn, District 2 City Councilor, Boston City Council
  • 10:00AM: Panel 1, Community-Engaged Research Studies in Boston Chinatown/Asian Communities
    • Moderator: Susan Koch-Weser, Assistant Professor of Public Health and Community Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine (TUSM)
    • Panelists:
      • Cindy Liu, Director of the Developmental Risk and Cultural Disparities Program, Brigham and Women’s Hospital; Assistant Professor, Pediatric Newborn Medicine and Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School. Uncovering the Stress and Mental Health Experiences in Boston Chinese Immigrant Families: The Role of Research in Program Development.
      • Christina Sakai, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, Tufts University School of Medicine. Pathways to Autism Diagnosis and Management in a Chinese Immigrant Community.
      • Yoyo Yau, Director of Programs, Boston Chinatown Neighborhood Center
      • Amy LeClair, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Tufts Medical Center. The Health of Asians and Chronic Disease Study.
      • Catherine Chang, Quality Assurance Director, Greater Boston Chinese Golden Age Center (GBCGAC)
      • Carina Katigbak, Assistant Professor, Connell School of Nursing, Boston College. Walking Together: A Multi-Component Intervention to Increase Physical Activity of Ethnic Minority Older Adults.
  • 11:15AM: Break
  • 11:30AM: Panel 2, Studies Conducted by Emerging Scholars: Building the Pipeline of Health Equity Researchers
    • Moderator: Virginia Chomitz, Associate Professor of Public Health and Community Medicine, TUSM
    • Panelists:
      • Mehreen Ismail, PhD Candidate in Food Policy and Applied Nutrition, Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, Tufts University. Food Access and Food Security Experiences of Affordable Housing Residents in Boston’s Chinatown.
      • Taylor Ahlborn, MS Candidate in Biomedical Sciences, TUSM. Facilitators and Barriers in the Service Network for Victims of Violence in the Asian-American Community in Massachusetts. 
      • Jean Jiyoung Lim, PhD Candidate, TUSM. Health Communication in Boston’s Chinatown.
  • 12:15PM: Next Steps and Closing Remarks
    • Carolyn Rubin, ADAPT Director
  • 12:30PM: Lunch and Networking

Spread the Word

Download a flyer (PDF) to share with your networks, colleagues, and friends!

 

This event is provided free of charge, and was supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of health, Award Number UL1TR002544. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

Town Hall
T.5 Town Hall

Investigators from across the Tufts CTSI partnership are invited to attend a Town Hall discussion with leadership from the T.5 Capacity in Medical Devices Program to identify research support needs and explore collaborative research opportunities.

Background

An important Tufts CTSI objective is to accelerate the translation of medical device research from idea, to testable product, to impact on health. Most translational efforts fail during the transition from promise to delivery due to scientific, technical, sociological, and financial barriers. Leveraging the new partnership with Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), our T.5 Capacity in Medical Devices (T.5) program bridges the critical translation from preclinical development to initial human studies and gives Tufts CTSI investigators access to extensive expertise and specialized resources for prototyping, preclinical testing, and iterative refinement to reduce translational failures in the research-to-device pipeline. We use the term “T.5” to highlight the bidirectional, interdisciplinary, and intersectoral nature of preclinical R&D and the role that testing and optimization in this phase has on outcomes at T1 and beyond.

Open Discussion Goals

The Tufts CTSI T.5 program proposes research and education initiatives including:

  • Creating a T.5 Resource Center to provide consultations and navigation to relevant T.5 resources at MIT and beyond.
  • Building a Living R&D Laboratory to provide a physical space to meet a range of device-testing needs.
  • Providing a multifaceted CTSI touchdown space on MIT campus to foster collaboration to advance medical device/diagnostic clinical research capacity.
  • Supporting research exchange and training opportunities to empower team-centric interaction.

Through the T.5 Town Hall discussion with investigators, we seek to understand the medical device development research and education needs across the Tufts CTSI partnership. These discussions will allow us to identify real-life use case exemplars to inform the development of the most relevant and impactful T.5 program infrastructure, services, and mentoring and to kick-start new research collaborations.

T.5 Program Leadership

The T.5 Town Hall will be led by:

  • Elazer R. Edelman, MD, PhD, Director of the Institute for Medical Engineering and Science (IMES), the Biomedical Engineering Center (BMEC), and the Clinical Research Center (CRC) at MIT and the Tufts CTSI T.5 Director
  • Kumaran Kolandaivelu, MD, PhD, CRC Medical Director at MIT and the Tufts CTSI T.5 Associate Director
  • Catherine Ricciardi, NP, DNP, CRC Nursing Director at MIT

Town Hall Format

The T.5 Town Hall will include a short presentation by the T.5 Leadership Team and an opportunity for input from all participants on the future of the T.5 Program.

Details

Monday, February 4, 12:15-1:45PM
35 Kneeland Street, Boston MA
8th Floor Large Conference Room

Or via WebEx

Registration

To attend in-person or via WebEx, please register here.

 

Seminars & Workshops
Advancing Confidence and Connection in Public Speaking

Need help finding your voice and engaging your audience? Want to improve your communication skills to convey complex information to others?

Join Tufts CTSI for an exciting two-part workshop, Advancing Confidence and Connection in Public Speaking. In two 90-minute interactive sessions, Bridget Kathleen O’Leary, MFA, Visiting Artist in Directing at Tufts University School of Arts and Sciences, will lead guide attendees through the process of finding confidence in their own voices.

Part One of the workshop will teach you how to pitch your research to audiences large and small through increased confidence and audience engagement techniques.

Part Two will help you to deliver dry information in a clear and engaging way, creating a narrative flow and conversation with an audience.

After attending Parts One and Two of this workshop, participants should be able to:

  • Recognize how voice and speech impact efficient communication
  • Practice elements of relaxation, resonance, and expressiveness during public speaking
  • Recall techniques to command the attention of, and engagement, with their audience
  • Identify techniques to communicate ideas and objectives with clarity and authenticity

Participants are expected to attend both 90-minute sessions and should bring to Part Two a 2-3 minute sample piece (lecture, presentation, pitch, or persuasive argument).

Details

Part One: Tuesday, March 12, 3:30-5:00PM, 8th Floor Large Conference Room, 35 Kneeland Street, Boston MA

Part Two: Friday, March 15, 2:30-4:00PM, 8th Floor Large Conference Room, 35 Kneeland Street, Boston MA

Registration

Please register here.

Tufts CTSI Professional Education & Expectation for Course Participants

Tufts CTSI’s Professional Education programs provide non-degree continuing education and training for clinical and translational research professionals from all Tufts CTSI partners and beyond.

Course enrollment priority is given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions. If your participation needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may provide their contact information when you register for the program.

This course is provided free of charge, and was supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of health, Award Number UL1TR002544. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

Seminars & Workshops
Museum of Science-Tufts CTSI Forum Collaboration: Topic Selection Workshop

Would you like to help to determine the topics and questions to be discussed at upcoming Museum of Science/Tufts CTSI public forums on health research?

Tufts CTSI and Museum of Science, Boston are planning four public forums on important topics in health research. At each forum, we will invite the public to engage in interactive and facilitated discussions as they work together to make decisions or solve a problem.

We need your help to choose a topic for deliberation at the first forum, to be held at the Museum of Science in fall 2019.

We are looking for people with different values, opinions, and ideas to come together at an all-day Topic Selection Workshop on Friday, March 1 to select a forum topic that will help inform local researchers about the needs, concerns, and ideas of the community.

Workshop participants will hear lightning talks from community members and experts in the fields of addiction, precision medicine, and exercise/nutrition research and form small groups to discuss, narrow down, and select questions that will be important and interesting for the public to deliberate. By involving community partners and other stakeholders in the beginning of the process, we hope to leave this workshop with the topic of the fall 2019 forum and a plan to move forward to further engage the local community in science and research.

Speakers will include:

Details

Friday, March 1, 8:30AM-5:00PM (breakfast and lunch will be provided)
Tufts Center for Medical Education, Room 114 East
145 Harrison Avenue, Boston MA

Registration

Registration is required. Please register here by February 25.

Tufts CTSI Professional Education & Expectation for Course Participants

Tufts CTSI’s Professional Education programs provide non-degree continuing education and training for clinical and translational research professionals from all Tufts CTSI partners and beyond.

Course enrollment priority is given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions. If your participation needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may provide their contact information when you register for the program.

This course is provided free of charge, and was supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of health, Award Number UL1TR002544. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

Open House
Recruitment & Retention Support Unit (RRSU) Open House

You are invited to a Recruitment and Retention Support Unit (RRSU) Open House!

Meet the Tufts CTSI RRSU team and learn how they can provide investigators with practical, evidence-based recruitment and retention support in both the pre- and post-award phases of a research study. Whether you’re a researcher, patient, or clinical support staff, please stop by the Tufts Medical Center Atrium and learn about the services offered.

Details

RRSU Open House
Tuesday, January 15, 2019, 11AM-2PM
Tufts Medical Center Atrium
800 Washington Street, Boston

Seminars & Workshops
Pfizer Oncology Drug Discovery and Development Workshop

Are you new to drug development research? Interested in learning more about obtaining FDA approval of an investigational drug product?

In this one-day drug development workshop, two groups will ‘role-play’ multidisciplinary drug development teams attempting to bring a new chemical entity from the idea stage all the way to review by the FDA. Each participant will be assigned a specific role on a typical oncology study team (i.e., project manager, discovery/pharmaceutical scientist, drug safety, regulatory, or market assessment specialist) and will serve as the expert in a particular component of the process.

The 3-D Oncology simulation relies on a computer program to generate ‘results’ from the scientific experiments and clinical studies that the team will conduct. For this program, Pfizer Oncology will have several medical facilitators available to participate.

This will be a great professional development opportunity for those new to drug development research or looking to learn more. Please note this program is not CME accredited.

Some key take home messages from the program include:

  • The oncology drug development process is complicated and time consuming.
  • The oncology drug development process is costly.
  • Drug development is competitive.
  • Drug development requires teamwork.
  • Drug development does not always produce viable products.
  • Managing both the science and regulatory environment is critical in the drug development process.

Details

Wednesday, March 20, 2019, 9:00AM-3:30PM
Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, 145 Harrison Avenue, Boston MA

Registration

Admission to the workshop is by application only. To apply, please register here by March 6, 2019.

We are recruiting 16-18 early career investigators, clinical and/or research fellows, and other research staff. Admission to the workshop is by application only and priority will be given to researchers and clinical fellows from Tufts CTSI partner institutions. A background in oncology research is preferred though not required. All must commit to being an active participant in the full session. Once registration is full, you may be placed on a waitlist.

Attendance and active participation in the full workshop (9AM–3:30PM) is critical to this group-based workshop format. You will be expected to actively engage with your assigned role, participate in group discussion, and respectfully work as an active member of your oncology study team.

Tufts CTSI Professional Education & Expectation for Course Participants

Tufts CTSI’s Professional Education programs provide non-degree continuing education and training for clinical and translational research professionals from all Tufts CTSI partners and beyond.

Course enrollment priority is given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions. If your participation needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may provide their contact information when you register for the program.

This course is provided free of charge, and was supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of health, Award Number UL1TR002544. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

Seminars & Workshops
To Resubmit or Not: Considerations and Next Steps When Your Proposal Isn’t Funded

Did you miss the payline for funding your NIH Proposal? Need help interpreting reviews and deciding when is best to revise and resubmit?

Join Tufts CTSI and the Tufts University Office of Research Development, part of the Office of the Vice Provost for Research, for this valuable one-hour seminar and panel discussion focusing on best practices for surviving peer review and successfully resubmitting an NIH proposal. Seasoned PIs will review reasoning and rationale behind changes they have made in response to study section review. Drawing on insights they have gained as applicants, reviewers, and mentors, they will delve into approaches to evaluating Summary Statements, tailoring responses, and rethinking aims. With expertise spanning the basic-to-clinical research spectrum, panelists will bring a wide range of perspectives on using critiques to improve a study whether in the lab or in the clinic. Topics will include:

  • Interpreting reviewer comments
  • Deciding whether to resubmit
  • Understanding what needs to be changed
  • Framing the Introduction and responding to specific criticisms
  • Avoiding common problems in resubmissions
  • Finding resources or collaborators to strengthen the research plan

Panelists will include:

  • Marta Gaglia, PhD, Assistant Professor of Molecular Biology & Microbiology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences
  • Caroline Genco, PhD, Arthur E Spiller Professor & Chair of Immunology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences
  • Cheryl London, DVM, PhD, Anne Engen and Dusty Professor in Comparative Oncology, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine

Details

January 24, 2019, 2:00–3:00 PM
35 Kneeland Street, Boston MA
8th Floor Large Conference Room

Registration

This program is open to all early career investigators, clinical and/or research fellows, and seasoned PIs from Tufts CTSI partner institutions. Any researcher considering their options for a recent unfunded proposal to NIH or similar funding agencies is welcome to attend.

Please register here by January 18, 2019.

Learning Objectives

After attending this session, participants should be able to:

  • Interpret common reviewer comments
  • Identify key factors to assess when considering a resubmission
  • Recognize items reviewers may look for in resubmitted proposals
  • Identify Tufts University and Tufts CTSI resources to help strengthen your application

Tufts CTSI Professional Education & Expectation for Course Participants

Tufts CTSI’s Professional Education programs provide non-degree continuing education and training for clinical and translational research professionals from all Tufts CTSI partners and beyond.

Course enrollment priority is given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions. If your participation needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may provide their contact information when you register for the program.

This course is provided free of charge, and was supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of health, Award Number UL1TR002544. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

Conferences & Symposia
AWARE for All Boston

On Tuesday, October 23rd, 2018 in Boston, MA local community members, patients, and research professionals will come together to learn about clinical research, get free health screenings, and hear from physician and patient speakers.

AWARE for All is a free educational program that provides valuable information and resources on the clinical research process to help people make informed decisions about participation. The event serves as a platform for dialogue between local patients, members of the public, and research professionals. This program is made possible by the incredible community partners we collaborate with in every city.

Registration is encouraged but not mandatory! We look forward to seeing you on Tuesday, October 23rd, 2018 at the NonProfit Center. For more information, please email awareforall@ciscrp.org or call 617-725-2750.

Please register here.

Seminars & Workshops
Cardiac Cachexia Across Species

How can veterinarians and physicians collaborate to solve health problems?

Learn about a practical example of One Health, a multi-disciplinary approach to address a common and serious health condition, at Tufts Medical Center’s Medical Ground Rounds on October 5.

Lisa Freeman, DVM, PhD, DACVN, Director of Tufts CTSI One Health Program and Amanda Vest, MBBS, MPH, Medical Director, Cardiac Transplantation Program, will discuss their research collaboration for improved diagnosis and treatment of cardiac cachexia, a complex wasting condition recognized in as many as 20-50% of humans with systolic heart failure and in similar numbers of pet dogs with spontaneously-occurring heart failure.

This one-hour seminar will present current challenges in the clinic and research, and novel opportunities to identify cardiac cachexia earlier and to treat it more effectively through One Health methods.

After the seminar, participants will be able to:

  • Recognize similarities and differences in cardiac cachexia across species.
  • Describe the mechanisms underlying cardiac cachexia.
  • List methods for diagnosing cardiac cachexia.
  • Discuss the potential benefits of cross-species research in developing strategies for treating cardiac cachexia.

Details

Friday, October 5, 2018, 12:00-1:00PM
Wolff Auditorium, Tufts Medical Center, 800 Washington Street, Boston

You are welcome to bring your own lunch.

This Grand Rounds is designed by Tufts CTSI, an NIH-funded research services organization for the Tufts community and beyond.

Registration

Registration is not required.

Conferences & Symposia
Regional CTSA Shared Mentoring Symposium

4thAnnual Shared Mentoring Symposium

Join us for a time of networking, panel discussion, and one-to-one mentoring.

This half-day symposium is geared towards fellows and junior faculty who are in the early stages of their careers and interested in exploring mentorship and career develop within clinical and  translation research. The event provides an excellent opportunity to network with peers from local CTSA institutions and receive career development advice.

The symposium is hosted by the UMass Center for Clinical and Translational Science and co-sponsored by Boston University CTSI, Tufts University CTSI, and Harvard Catalyst.

Please register here by October 5.

Seminars & Workshops
Researcher Book Club

Overview

Want to make time for leadership training and discussion?

This fall, join Tufts CTSI’s inaugural researcher book club to foster your leadership skills.

Paul Beninger, MD, MBA, Assistant Professor of Public Health and Community Medicine and Director of the MD/MBA & MBS/MBA Program at Tufts University School of Medicine, will provide coaching over four book club lunches. The book club will encourage social reading, interactive exercises, and discussion on practical challenges you and your peers face. You will gain practical insights to manage your career and lay early foundations for critical soft skills expected for today’s leaders in team-based science.

Learning Objectives

After completing this book club program, you will have insights into:

  • Discovering your strengths and challenges as observed by yourself and others
  • Examining the triad of soft skills required in working relationships: teamwork and collaboration, negotiation and conflict resolution, and management and leadership.
  • Reframing management and leadership as a broad spectrum of skills to reflect upon and practice daily in the workplace

Dates and Location

Dates: Four 90-minute sessions on Tuesdays in fall 2018

Location: Tufts University’s Boston Health Sciences Campus

  • Session I, October 16, 2018, 12:00-1:30pm: Circle One – Self
  • Session II, October 30, 2018 12:00-1:30pm Circle Two – Other
  • Session III, November 20, 12:00-1:30pm Circle Three – Institutions & Job Knowledge
  • Session IV, December 11, 12:00-1:30pm Circle Four – Management and Leadership

Registration and Requirements

  • Registration Deadline: Register here by Monday, October 8, 2018
    Registration is first come, first served, and priority is given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions. Once the course is full, additional registrants will be put on a waitlist and invited to the next opportunity. We will confirm your enrollment as soon we finalize the registration list.
  • Target Audience: We are recruiting 12-15 early career clinical, biomedical, or public health researchers, including assistant-level professors, post-graduate scientists such as post-doctoral scholars, research fellows, clinical fellows or senior residents conducting or pursuing research. Priority will be given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions. All must commit to attending every session and completing assignments.
  • Assignments:
    • Readings:
    • Private Reflection Journal: You will be encouraged to start keeping a private journal and are invited to share your learnings with others in the the class throughout the course. Book chapters are in a workbook format and include guiding questions and practical toolbox skills and exercises that you may choose to use or reflect upon.

Expected Time Commitment

Class attendance is critical to this peer-led discussion format. You will be expected to actively engage in classroom discussion, be open-minded, and respectfully respond to any constructive feedback. If your participation needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may provide their contact information when you register for the book club.

About Paul Beninger, MD, MBA

Dr. Beninger is Assistant Professor of Public Health & Community Medicine at Tufts University School of Medicine, where he is the Director of the MD/MBA and MBS/MBA Programs. He has more than three decades of career experience as a regulator and member of the Senior Executive Service in the US Food and Drug Administration, as a manager and executive in the pharmaceutical industry, including pharmacovigilance, and as a member of the academic community.

Dr. Beninger began his career in drug development in 1987 at the US Food and Drug Administration, first as a reviewer and manager for drugs against HIV/AIDS and opportunistic infections and then as a division director for medical devices. He joined Merck & Company in 1995 and developed experience in regulatory affairs, medical affairs and drug safety in the areas of anti-infective drug and biological products, vaccines, anti-diabetic drug products and oncology drug products, before joining Genzyme as vice-president of pharmacovigilance in 2006; Genzyme was acquired by Sanofi in 2011. Dr. Beninger retired from Genzyme-Sanofi in April 2017.

Dr. Beninger trained in internal medicine and infectious diseases. He received his MD from the University of California, Davis, his BA from Claremont McKenna College in Claremont, California, his MBA from St Joseph’s University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and his graduate certificate in epidemiology from Tufts.

Dr Beninger has published and spoken extensively on regulatory science, drug and vaccine safety, and pharmacovigilance. He is a topics editor (pharmacovigilance and pharmacoepidemiology) for Clinical Therapeutics, and a fellow of the American College of Physicians and the Infectious Disease Society of America.

Conferences & Symposia
Health Equity Research: Symposium Plus

Interested in health equity research? Want to meet collaborators and develop grant proposals?

Join Tufts CTSI for Health Equity Research: Symposium Plus on Wednesday, October 10 at Tufts University’s Boston Health Sciences Campus. This interactive event will focus on nascent research projects with the goals of assisting teams to develop research project proposals for future grant submissions and engaging all event participants in team science approaches to further catalyze research ideas.

Research project proposals to be presented are:

  • Extending Access to Cancer Genetic Counseling to Maine’s Rural, Remote Communities by Susan Miesfeldt, MD, Maine Medical Center
  • Assessing Racial Differences in Cardiovascular Disease Risks Among Veterans by Adolfo Cuevas, PhD, Tufts University
  • Linking Financing, Workforce, and Clinical Care to Improve Behavioral Health Integration for the Most Vulnerable by Diana Bowser, ScD, MPH, Brandeis University
  • Communication Intervention for Dental Hygienists to Deliver to Teens Around Crystal Meth Use Prevention by Margie Skeer, ScD, MPH, MSW, Tufts University School of Medicine

By the end of this interactive symposium, event participants will be able to:

  • Describe methods for including a health equity focus in a proposal to improve overall health outcomes.
  • Recognize how research teams develop research projects, from concept toward a written funding proposal.
  • Identify Tufts CTSI team-based translational science resources that can help advance a research project.
  • Articulate the value of gathering peer and expert feedback during the development of fundable proposal.

Details

Wednesday, October 10, 9:00AM-3:00PM
Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, DeBlois Auditorium
145 Harrison Avenue, Boston MA

Registration

To attend, please register here by October 1.

Conferences & Symposia
Translational Research Day 2018: Addiction Research in the Lab, Clinic, and Community
Translational Research Day 2018: Slide Deck (PDF)
Translational Research Day 2018: Agenda/Schedule (PDF)

Translational Research Day 2018: Presenter Biographies and Abstracts (PDF)

 

Interested in finding translational solutions to addiction?

Don’t miss Translational Research Day 2018: Addiction Research in the Lab, Clinic, and Community.

Wednesday, November 7
8:30AM-4:00PM
Tufts Center for Medical Education, Room 114
145 Harrison Avenue, Boston

Registration

Please register to attend in-person or online.

Agenda

Do you have a poster on addiction research?

Present it at Translational Research Day! Details are available here. The deadline to submit poster abstracts is Monday, October 22.

Get Social

Look for #TranslationalTufts18 on social media and join the conversation.

 

Seminars & Workshops
Scientific Manuscript Writing Workshops

Overview

Need to transform your ideas into a publishable manuscript? Finding it difficult to write alone?

 

Before the new academic year gets underway, spend just four lunch meetings with your colleagues to write the core sections of your manuscript. Commit to attending four 75-minute working lunches to work on your draft.

 

Optional service requests are available for one-on-one consultations on general English writing or basic science-specific writing styles.

 

Dates and Location (Late Summer and Early Fall)

Boston Health Sciences Campus, location TBD
  • Session I: Friday, July 6, 12:00–1:15PM
  • Session II: Friday, July 13, 12:00–1:15PM
  • Session III: Monday, September 17, 11:30AM-12:45PM*
  • Session IV: Monday, September 24, 11:30AM-12:45PM*

*September dates are subject to change.

Registration and Requirements

Twelve seats are available, and priority is given to faculty members who commit to attending and submitting their manuscript drafts prior to all four sessions. You do not have to have study results, findings, abstract, or references ready to get the essential work done, but it would be beneficial for you to have some elements of a work in progress such as the introduction, methods, or results section of a paper.

 

 

First assignment due by Monday, July 2, 2018.
  • Reading
    • Welch HG (1999) Preparing manuscripts for submission to medical journals: the paper trail. Eff Clin Pract 2:131–137
  • Submit the first draft in Microsoft Word to Sarah Jette. Minimum requirements:
    • One or two paragraphs for Introduction
    • Two to four paragraphs for Methods
    • Three to five tables or figures or data graphs that illustrate your data, even if you don’t have findings to date
  • Subsequent drafts and peer review are due two business days prior to each session.

 

Details

Tufts CTSI is excited to recruit up to 12 motivated biomedical and clinical faculty members to join an inaugural workshop series designed to get you started on efficient manuscript writing. Don’t miss this chance to get face time with Robert J. Goldberg, PhD and his advice on the elements of successful manuscripts such as navigating major journals, dealing with sample sizes, scientific writing style, and approaches to sentence composition.

 

The program is focused solely on hands-on writing exercises and peer review with expert coaching. The participants will incorporate class feedback and submit a new draft each session with a goal of polishing each section of their scientific manuscript in the IMRAD (Introduction, Methods, Results, and Discussion) format.

 

By the end of the series, you may have outlined subheadings of the Methods, Results (if applicable), and Discussion sections, and begun identifying the strengths and limitations of your study.

Workshop Faculty

  • Main instructor: Robert J. Goldberg, PhD, Professor, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Department of Quantitative Health Sciences
  • Guest instructor: Nicholas Moustakas, MA, Research Development Specialist, Tufts CTSI

Learning Objectives

By the end of this workshop series, you will be able to:
  • Discuss the core components of a successful scientific manuscript
  • Identify strategies and next steps for completing a full manuscript for peer review submission
  • Anticipate reviewers concerns in discussing and presenting your research in writing and how to best respond to those concerns

Expectation for Homework and Your Commitment

Registration is first come, first served, and priority is given to members of Tufts CTSI partner institutions. Once the course is full, additional registrants will be put on a waitlist and invited to the next opportunity. We will confirm your enrollment as soon we finalize the registration list.

 

Class attendance is critical to this peer review-based format. If your participation in these workshops needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may optionally provide the contact information when you register for the workshop program. You will be expected to provide thoughtful reviews of teammate drafts and actively engage in classroom discussion. We ask participants to come open-minded and show positive responses to constructive feedback.

 

Conferences & Symposia
Evidence and the Individual Patient: Understanding Heterogeneous Treatment Effects for Patient-Centered Care

 

This conference will explore the inherent limitations of using group data to guide treatment decisions for individuals. Topics will include examining HTE as it pertains to personalized decision making and precision medicine, modifying care in light of more personalized evidence, and identifying the highest policy and research priorities to facilitate translation and dissemination of these methods. This conference will take a broad view of personalized/precision medicine that seeks to take into account the full gamut of patient-level variation (i.e. not just genetic/pharmacogenetic variation). Conference participants will include thought leaders and stakeholders who are developing and promulgating methods for more individualized evidence from academic, government and regulatory sectors.

Register for the live webcast here.

 

 

 

Conferences & Symposia
Sensors, Biomarkers, and Devices in Medicine: Symposium Plus

Interested in the next-generation of clinical sensors, biomarkers, and devices? Want to meet translational research collaborators and develop grant proposals?

Join Tufts CTSI for Sensors, Devices, and Biomarkers in Medicine: Symposium Plus on Tuesday, April 24 at Tufts University School of Dental Medicine, Room 1414 (1 Kneeland Street, Boston). This interactive event will focus on nascent research projects with the goals of assisting teams to develop research project proposals for future grant submissions and engaging all event participants in team science approaches to further catalyze research ideas.

Four projects will be presented and discussed:

  • Non-invasive Detection of CSF Derived Exosomal PD Biomarkers in Olfactory Mucus, submitted by Mansoor Amiji, PhD, Northeastern University
  • Clinical Testing of Glucose and Lactate Biosensors, submitted by Ahmed Busnaina, PhD, Northeastern University
  • Toward Connected, Distributed, Self-Powered, and Self-Optimizing Medical Implants, submitted by Tommaso Melodia, PhD, MS Northeastern University
  • Developing an Activity-Dependent Biomarker of Upper Motor Neuron Dysfunction in ALS, submitted by Oscar Soto, MD, Tufts Medical Center

By the end of this interactive symposium, you should be able to:

  • Describe potential translational roadblocks in developing, testing, and using sensor-and device-based health prevention, detection, management, or intervention strategies.
  • Examine potential pitfalls of intellectual property (IP) in the development of these technologies or strategies.
  • Identify stage-appropriate funding mechanisms and understand the attributes that make a project attractive to funding agencies.
  • Identify Tufts CTSI resources that can help me in advancing a research project and that support team-based translational science.
  • Explain the value of peer and expert feedback in the process of developing a fundable proposal.

Details

Tuesday, April 24, 9:00AM-3:00PM
Tufts University School of Dental Medicine, Rachel’s Auditorium, Room 1414
1 Kneeland Street, Boston MA

Registration

To attend, please register here by April 20.

Conferences & Symposia
20th Annual Clinical and Translational Science Graduate Program Symposium

Overview

The 20th Annual Clinical and Translational Science (CTS) Graduate Program Symposium will be Friday, May 18, 8:00AM-1:00PM in Wolff Auditorium at Tufts Medical Center (800 Washington Street, Boston).

This year’s keynote speaker is Isaac Kohane, MD, PhD, Chair of the Department of Biomedical Informatics and  Marion V. Nelson Professor of Biomedical Informatics at Harvard Medical School.

The event will also feature presentations and posters by students enrolled in the CTS Graduate Program, and the 2018 Clinical and Translational Science Poster Competition.

Schedule

7:30AM – Breakfast

8:15AM – Welcome by David M. Kent, MD, MSc

8:30-9:45AM – Presentations

  • 8:30AM: Alexa Craig, MD, MS
  • 8:45AM: Taimur Dad, MD, MS
  • 9:00AM: Kimberly S. Esham, MD, MS
  • 9:15AM: Vaibhav Kumar, MD, MS

9:30-10:30AM – Student Poster Session (Atrium) and Clinical & Translational Science Poster Competition (Wolff Auditorium Lobby; winner will be announced at 10:00AM)

10:30-11:45AM – Presentations

  • 10:30AM: Jana Cerullo Leary, MD, MS
  • 10:45AM: Henry Rogalin, PhD, MS
  • 11:00AM: Alexander A. Xu, MS
  • 11:15AM: Lauren Westafer, DO, MS
  • 11:30AM: Teresa May, DO, MS

11:45AM – Closing Remarks

12:00PM – Keynote Lecture/Medical Grand Rounds by Isaac Kohane, MD, PhD, Chair of the Department of Biomedical Informatics and  Marion V. Nelson Professor of Biomedical Informatics at Harvard Medical School.

Seminars & Workshops
Write a Winning NIH Aims Page & Narrative

Tufts CTSI is sponsoring a group viewing of a live webinar, Specific Aims & Narrative Sections: Grab NIH Reviewers’ Attention, Get Your Grant Funded, on Thursday, February 15, 1:00-2:30PM.

Presented by Principal Investigator (PI) Leader (formally known as PI Association), this 90-minute in-depth lecture will be available for viewing to researchers who join us in-person at the Tufts Boston Health Sciences Campus.

The webinar will include a lecture by Christopher Dant, PhD, an NIH-trained grant writer and former journal editor at JAMA. He worked as a senior writer and managed publications at Stanford’s Medical School and established and built the Clinical Publications Division at Genentech in California. Until recently, Dr. Dant served on the faculty at Dartmouth Medical School and Norris Cotton Cancer Center to deliver lectures on NIH grant writing and manuscript writing.

Details

Thursday, February 15, 2018, 1:00-2:30PM
Tufts CTSI
35 Kneeland Street, 8th Floor
Boston, MA

Registration

Space is limited. To attend, please register here by Friday, February 9.

 

Seminars & Workshops
A Team-based Approach to Data and Safety Monitoring Boards

What is a Data Safety and Monitoring Board (DSMB), and how can it improve your study?

IRBs and funding agencies often require DSMBs for intervention studies. Find out what DSMBs do and how best to collaborate with them at a two-hour Tufts CTSI seminar, A Team-based Approach to Data and Safety Monitoring Boards (DSMBs). Led by clinical study experts, this interactive training will consist of didactic lectures, discussions, and group activities for investigators and their clinical study teams, including research fellows, coordinators, research nurses, data managers, biostatisticians, regulatory personnel, and IRB members.

Instructors/Facilitators

  • Tamsin Knox, MD, MPH, Associate Professor, Tufts University School of Medicine; Associate Director, Tufts CTSI, Regulatory Affairs and Clinical and Translational Research Center (CTRC)
  • Farzad Noubary, PhD, Assistant Professor, Tufts University School of Medicine, Biostatistician, Tufts CTSI, BERD Center
  • Julie SantaCroce Burt, Clinical Research Coordinator, Tufts Medical Center

Training Outline

  • Introduction & Overview of DSMBs
  • Primacy of Data for Effective DSMB Review: Planning, Managing, and Reporting
  • Dealing with Different Types of Safety Events
  • Working with Biostatisticians
  • Break
  • Group Activity/Table Exercises

Learning Objectives

By the end of this seminar, you will be able to:

  • Describe roles and responsibilities in working with a DSMB
  • Locate DSMBs’ extended scientific expertise and support in the context of a disease, population, or intervention
  • Recognize the importance of engaging a DSMB in an early stage of your study design
  • Recognize DSMBs’ comprehensive approaches to safety monitoring as valuable steps for patient safety

Details

Tuesday, March 27, 9:00-11:00AM
Tufts Center for Medical Education, Room 221
145 Harrison Avenue
Boston, MA

Registration

Please register here to attend.

 

Seminars & Workshops
Pediatric Clinical Trials Workshop

Seminar Info

Need a larger sample size for your clinical trial? Interested in increasing research participation from children with diverse backgrounds? Join Tufts CTSI and Children’s National CTSA on Wednesday, April 18, 2018, 8:00AM-5:00PM in Washington DC, Marriott Wardman Park, at an inaugural workshop, Challenges & Opportunities in Pediatric Clinical Trials, designed for pediatric investigators and their teams.

This free, one-day, immersive case-based workshop is the first CTSA hub-sponsored forum for all levels of investigators to reflect on the core competencies expected for today’s pediatric clinical studies. It will take place the day before the Association for Clinical and Translational Science’s Translational Science 2018.

Details

Wednesday, April 18, 8:00AM-5:00PM
Washington Marriott Wardman Park, Washington, DC, Madison Room
(*prior to ACTS Annual Meeting 4/19/18–4/21/18)

Seminars & Workshops
Issues of Trust in Research Participation

Seminar Info

Are you a researcher experiencing difficulties with recruiting research participants? Are you a physician, nurse, or staff member who refers patients to clinical trials?

Trust is a major barrier to patients considering enrollment in research trials. Explore the causes and results of mistrust and learn why “trust me” is not enough at Issues of Trust in Research Participation, a Tufts Medical Center Grand Rounds event. This hour-long seminar will be led by Robert Sege, MD, PhD, Co-Director of Tufts CTSI’s Stakeholder and Community Engagement Program, Chief Medical Officer & Director of The Medical Foundation at Health Resources in Action (HRiA), and Adjunct Professor of Medicine and Pediatrics at Tufts University School of Medicine. Dr. Sege will present a history of unethical studies conducted with vulnerable populations, and will discuss more recent controversies surrounding placebo-controlled trials at the beginning of the AIDS epidemic. Following his presentation, there will be a panel discussion on patient advocacy and community perspectives.

After attending this session, you should be able to:

  • Describe current and historical reasons for mistrust of medical research.
  • Recognize the need to examine issues of trust in the design and communication of clinical studies.
  • Understand patients who hesitate to enroll in clinical studies and trials.
  • Utilize Tufts CTSI expertise to better communicate with participants and research teams.

Details

Friday, February 2, noon-1:00PM
Wolff Auditorium, Tufts Medical Center
800 Washington Street, Boston

You are welcome to bring your own lunch.

 

Conferences & Symposia
4th Annual Asian Health Symposium: In Pursuit of Health & Wellness: Addressing the Impact of Stress in Asian Immigrant Communities

Would you like an opportunity for community-building, networking, learning about, and addressing the impact of stress on Asian immigrant populations? Mark your calendar for the 4th Annual Asian Health Symposium, In Pursuit of Health & Wellness: Addressing the Impact of Stress in Asian Immigrant Communities.

This exciting event, free and open to all, is hosted by the Addressing Disparities in Asian Populations Through Translational Research (ADAPT) Program.

After attending this session, you should be able to:

  • Describe the stressors related to daily living and social determinants facing Asian immigrants
  • Identify resources and services available for mitigating the impact of stress in the community
  • Recognize the value of cross-community dialogue in addressing the impact of stress on Asian immigrant communities

Details

Friday, April 6, 2018, 9:30AM-1:30PM
Pao Arts Center
99 Albany Street, Boston MA, 02111

Agenda

  • 9:00AM-9:30AM: Breakfast and registration
  • 9:30AM-9:50AM: Welcome and opening remarks
    • Alice Rushforth, Executive Director, Tufts CTSI
    • Megan Cheung, ADAPT Co-Chair; Associate Director/Clinical Director, Greater Boston Chinese Golden Age Center (GBCAC)
    • Carolyn Rubin, ADAPT Director, Tufts CTSI
  • 9:50AM-11:00AM: Panel 1: Stressors that Impact Asian Immigrant Communities
    • Moderator: Ed K.S. Wang, Director of Policy and Planning, Chester M. Pierce MD Division of Global Psychiatry at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH); Assistant Professor of Psychology, Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School; Member, Governor’s Advisory Council on Refugees and Immigrants; Board President, National Asian American Pacific Islander Mental Health Association
    • Panelists:
      • Mary Chin, Executive Director, Asian American Civic Association (AACA)
      • Lisette Le, Executive Director, Vietnamese American Initiative for Development (VietAID)
      • Niem Nay-Kret, Community Health Worker, Lowell Community Health Center
      • Anh Vu Sawyer, Executive Director, The Southeast Asian Coalition (SEAC)
      • Mary Truong, Executive Director, Massachusetts Office for Refugees and Immigrants (ORI)
  • 11:00AM-11:10AM: Break
  • 11:10AM-12:10PM: Panel 2: Innovative Strategies for Addressing Stress
    • Moderator: David Takeuchi, Associate Dean for Research, Dorothy Book Scholar, Professor, School of Social Work, Boston College
      Co-Founder, Research in Social, Economic and Environmental Equity (RISE3)
    • Panelists:
      • Pata Suyemoto, Writer, Educator, & Mental Health Activist
        Co-founder, Breaking Silences Project
      • Cynthia Woo, Director
        Pao Arts Center, Boston Chinatown Neighborhood Center
      • Albert Yeung, Co-Medical Director & Head of the Behavioral Health Department South Cove Community Health Center
        Director, Primary Care Studies of the Depression Clinical and Research Program
        Massachusetts General Hospital
      • Liao Zhang, Research Associate
        Disparities Research Unit at Massachusetts General Hospital
  • 12:10PM-1:10PM: Lunch and table discussions: Critical Factors that Contribute to Community Mental Health and Wellness
    • Susan Koch-Weser, Assistant Professor of Public Health and Community Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine
    • Jean Lim, former Asian Health Equity Fellow, Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine
  • 1:10PM-1:30PM: Groups report back and closing remarks
    • Carolyn Rubin, ADAPT Director, Tufts CTSI

Speakers

  • Mary Chin
    Executive Director, Asian American Civic Association
  • Susan Koch-Weser
    Assistant Professor of Public Health and Community Medicine
    Tufts University School of Medicine
  • Jean Lim
    Former Asian Health Equity Fellow, Department of Public Health and Community Medicine
    Tufts University School of Medicine
  • Lisette Le
    Executive Director, Vietnamese American Initiative for Development (VietAID)
  • Anh Vu Sawyer
    Southeast Asian Coalition of Massachusetts
  • Pata Suyemoto
    Writer, Educator, Mental Health Activist
  • David Takeuchi
    Professor and Dorothy Book Scholar
    Associate Dean for Research
    Co-Founder, Research in Social, Economic, and Environmental Equity (RISE³)
    School of Social Work, Boston College
  • Mary Truong
    Executive Director, Massachusetts Office for Refugees and Immigrants (ORI)
  • Ed K.S. Wang
    Director of Policy and Planning, Chester M. Pierce MD Division of Global Psychiatry at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH)
    Assistant Professor of Psychology, Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School
    Member, Governor’s Advisory Council on Refugees and Immigrants
    Board President, National Asian American Pacific Islander Mental Health Association
  • Cynthia Woo
    Director, Pao Arts Center
    Boston Chinatown Neighborhood Center
  • Albert Yeung
    Co-Medical Director and Head of the Behavioral Health Department at South Cove Community Health Center
    Director of Primary Care Studies of the Depression Clinical Research Program at MGH
  • Liao Zhang
    Research Associate, Disparities Research Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital

Registration

Please register here to attend.

Space is limited! Please register by March 16.

Seminars & Workshops
Expert Feedback on Changing Policies for NIH-Funded Studies

Seminar Materials

Seminar video (mp4)

Seminar slides (PowerPoint)

NIH Clinical Trial Requirements

Annotated Form E (PDF)

Seminar Info

Are you an NIH grant applicant, awardee, researcher or research administrator?
Feeling unprepared to grasp all regulatory changes scheduled to take effect in 2018?

Join us on December 5 at a seminar entitled Expert Feedback on Changing Policies for NIH-funded Studies. You will gain in-depth insights into recently announced requirements for NIH clinical trials grants and how the changes will affect you. Anyone planning to apply for an NIH grant early next year is strongly encouraged to attend.

This two-hour interactive seminar will feature joint presentations from regulatory experts representing the Tufts Health Sciences Institutional Review Board (IRB) and the Tufts University and Tufts Medical Center research administration offices. The expert panel will highlight the following topics, and current Tufts IRB-specific responses to the changes and recommendations for addressing potential roadblocks. Each topic will include a short presentation, followed by panel responses and audience Q&A.

Have questions? Please submit your inquiries when you register or email us at training@tuftsctsi.org. We will try to address all questions during the session!

Seminar Topics

  • Introduction & Review of New Requirements
  • NIH Policy Definition of Clinical Trials
  • Good Clinical Practice (GCP) Training
  • Single IRB: What Investigators Need to Know
  • ClinicalTrials.Gov
  • Other Changes to Note, Discussion, and Closing Remarks

Speaker Panel

  • Andreas Klein, MD, Director, Regulatory Affairs, Tufts CTSI; Tufts Medical Center; Chair, Tufts Health Sciences Institutional Review Board
  • Kathleen Benoit, Senior Research Administrator, Tufts University, Office of the Vice Provost for Research (OVPR)
  • Frederick M. Frankhauser, JD, MBA, RPh, Director, Grants & Contracts, Tufts Medical Center
  • Marcia Izzi, MPH, Business Finance Manager, Tufts CTSI
  • Meghan Coughlin, MS, Research Administrator, Office of Research Administration, Tufts Medical Center

After attending this session, you should be able to:

  • Identify tools and resources for determining if your study is a clinical trial and what actions are required for an NIH grant proposal, IRB applications, and study reporting
  • Outline financial and administrative prerequisites needed to collaborate with other institutions under the single IRB requirement
  • Describe the importance of engaging Tufts IRB in the early stage of proposal development

Details

Tuesday, December 5, 2017, 1:00-3:00PM
Jaharis Family Center for Biomedical Education and Nutrition Sciences, Behrakis Auditorium
150 Harrison Avenue, Boston MA 02111
Or via live, interactive webcast (a link will be provided to those who register).

Registration

Please click here to register to attend.

 

This seminar is sponsored by Tufts CTSI.

 

Conferences & Symposia
CTSA Shared Mentoring Symposium

This free, half-day symposium is geared towards fellows and junior faculty who are in the early stages of their careers and are interested in exploring mentorship and career development. The event will feature two panel sessions: one on career development strategies and a second on career opportunities in clinical and translational research. In addition to the panel sessions, participants will individually meet with senior faculty members from local CTSA institutions to discuss personal scenarios on career development.

This is an excellent opportunity to network with peers from local CTSA institutions and receive career development advice.

This event is hosted by Harvard Catalyst and co-sponsored by Boston University Clinical and Translational Science Institute, Tufts Clinical and Translational Science Institute, and University of Massachusetts Medical School Center for Clinical and Translational Science.

 

Conferences & Symposia
Translational Research Day 2017: Sensors, Devices, and Biomarkers in Medicine

Translational Research Day 2017 – PowerPoint Slides (PDF)

 

Tufts CTSI Symposium Plus on Sensors, Devices and Biomarkers in Medicine – Request for Proposals (PDF)

How can sensor, device, and biomarker data improve health, prevent and detect disease at an earlier stage, and personalize interventions?

Find out at Tufts CTSI’s Translational Research Day 2017: Sensors, Devices, and Biomarkers in Medicine.

Tuesday, November 14
8:30AM-4:00PM
Tufts Center for Medical Education, Room 114
145 Harrison Avenue, Boston

Registration

Please register to attend in-person or online.

Agenda

  • 8:30-9:00AM: Registration and Breakfast
  • 9:00AM: Introduction
  • 9:10AM: Innovations in the Industry
    • Digital Monitoring Biomarkers Come of Age: Justin Wright, PhD, Eli Lilly and Company
    • Improving the Assessment of Functional Change in CNS Clinical Trials: Josh Cosman, PhD, Pfizer
  • 9:45AM: Sensors and Devices
    • Smart Mechanical Support Devices for Cardiac Care: Navin Kapur, MD, Tufts Medical Center
    • In Vivo Nanosensors and Imaging Technologies: Heather Clark, PhD, Northeastern University 
    • Improving Behavioral Measurements from Mobile DevicesStephen S. Intille, PhD, Northeastern University
    • Embedded Functioning of Nanoscale Sensors in Hybrid Tissues: Brian Timko, PhD, Tufts University
  • 11:00AM: Break
  • 11:10AM: Biomarker Development and Application
    • Harmonizing Biomarker Terminology: NIH-FDA BEST (Biomarkers, EndpointS, and other Tools): Christopher Leptak, MD, PhD, US Food and Drug Administration
    • A Metatranscriptomic Approach to Salivary Biomarker Discovery in the Premature NewbornJill L. Maron, MD, MPH, Floating Hospital for Children at Tufts Medical Center
  • 11:50AM: Showcase: MIT Institute for Medical Engineering and Science (IMES)
  • 12:25PM: Networking Lunch and Poster Session
    • Introduction to Afternoon Program: Graham Jones, PhD, Tufts CTSI
    • 2016 and 2017 CTSI Pilot Studies Program Awardee Posters &
      Poster Presentations on Sensors, Devices, and Biomarker Research
  • 1:30PM: Case Studies
    • Introduction: Graham Jones, PhD, Tufts CTSI
    • The Challenge of Making Things Work Well: An Academic Perspective: Kumaran Kolandaivelu, MD, PhD, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
    • Lessons Learned from the Front Lines: Rami Tazafriri, PhD, and Michael Naimark, MS, CBSET, Inc.
    • Panel Discussion
  • 2:25PM: Funding Opportunities: Tufts CTSI Symposium Plus
    • Graham Jones, PhD, Tufts CTSI
    • Alysse Wurcel, MD, MS, Tufts Medical Center
    • John Leong, MD, PhD, Tufts University
  • 2:40PM: Breakout Session (Open to All)
  • 2:40PM: Concurrent Networking Reception
  • 4:00PM: Conference Ends

Do you have a poster on sensor, device, or biomarker research?

Present it at Translational Research Day! Details are available here.

Get Social

Look for #TranslationalTufts17 on social media and join the conversation.

Spread the word! Our Translational Research Day flyer is available here (PDF).

 

Seminars & Workshops
Managing Yourself Before Managing Others

Is your team working together effectively?

The success of all organizations depends upon how well members work. As research becomes more interdisciplinary, skills that promote collaboration are at a premium; but few of us have the time or opportunity to develop the skills necessary for successful teamwork, such as:

  • Delegation
  • Collaboration
  • Speaking clearly/succinctly
  • Engaging in conflict constructively
  • Listening
  • Prioritizing work
  • Creating focus
  • Building relationships

Take a break from your busy schedule to reflect on your own challenges with respect to working on a team. Give yourself the time to improve your non-technical skills and gain actionable information for making real change. Join Tufts CTSI for Managing Yourself Before Managing Others, a half-day workshop that will provide you with a self-assessment tool and peer feedback on an adaptive skill you hope to acquire or further develop.

Led by Cheryl D. Vaughan, PhD, EdM, Managing Director of Boston Biomedical Innovation Center (B-BIC) Skills Development Center, this workshop is customized to support the development of team science skills at Tufts CTSI and its partners. It was offered previously at the Science of Team Science (SciTS) Conference.

By the end of this workshop, you will be able to:

  • Compare biological immunity to behavioral immunity
  • Describe the Immunity to Change (ITC) method and how it works
  • Identify factors that hinder progress toward a self-improvement goal
  • Consider the challenges faced by teams trying to make meaningful change

Open to all faculty (academic or physician scientists) and their senior staff.
Limited to 20 participants. Participants must be able to attend the entire session.

Details

Wednesday, September 20, 9AM-1PM
Tufts University School of Dental Medicine, 1 Kneeland Street
14th Floor, CE Classroom (1415)

Lunch will be served.

Registration

Please register here by September 13.

 

Conferences & Symposia
4th Annual Comparative Effectiveness Research (CER) Symposium Plus

Interested in comparative effectiveness research (CER)? Want to meet collaborators and develop grant proposals?

Join Tufts CTSI for our 4th Annual CER Symposium Plus on Wednesday, June 7, 9:00AM-3:00PM in room 114 (145 Harrison Avenue, Boston). This interactive event will focus on several CER use cases, with the goals of assisting teams to develop research project proposals for future grant submissions, and engaging event participants in team science approaches to catalyze research ideas.

Agenda

8:30AM: Registration

9:00AM: Introduction

9:30AM: Project Presentations

  • Structured Opioid Use After Joint Arthroplasty submitted by Geneve M. Allison, MD, MSc, FACP, Tufts Medical Center
  • Modeling Spatiotemporal Contributors to Inter-Facility Clostridium Difficile Colitis Transmission submitted by Luke Muggy, PhD, RAND Corporation

10:30AM: Break

10:45AM: Project Presentations

  • Triggers for Palliative Care Engagement: A Comparative Effectiveness Study submitted by Signe Peterson Flieger, PhD, MSW, Tufts University
  • Linkage to HCV Treatment for People with Substance Use Disorders: A Comparative Effectiveness Research Study submitted by Thomas J. Stopka, PhD, Tufts University

11:45AM: Lunch and Networking

12:15PM: Introduction to Breakout Working Groups

12:30PM: Breakout Working Groups

2:00PM: Report-back, Summary, and Next Steps

2:30PM: Evaluations and Adjourn

 

By the end of this interactive symposium, you will be able to:

  • Describe how CER can help patients, clinicians, and other stakeholders identify the right treatment for a specific patient and a specific time.
  • Value peer and expert feedback as helpful in developing a team science proposal.
  • Describe how researchers presenting at Symposium Plus meetings can work with the CTSI toward submitting a fundable research proposal.
  • Identify the components of a successful CER research proposal.

All are welcome to attend! Please RSVP here.

Details

Wednesday, June 7, 9:00AM-3:00PM
Tufts Center for Medical Education, Room 114
145 Harrison Avenue, Boston MA

Conferences & Symposia
19th Annual Clinical and Translational Science Graduate Program Symposium

Overview

The 19th Annual Clinical and Translational Science (CTS) Graduate Program Symposium will be Friday, May 5, 8:00AM-1:00PM in Wolff Auditorium at Tufts Medical Center (800 Washington Street, Boston).

This year’s keynote speaker is Dariush Mozaffarian, MD, DrPH, Dean of the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science & Policy, and the Jean Mayer Chair and Professor of Nutrition. A board-certified cardiologist and epidemiologist, Dr. Mozaffarian’s research focuses on how diet and lifestyle influence cardiometabolic health and how effective policies can reduce these burdens. He has authored nearly 300 scientific publications on dietary fats, foods, and diet patterns; global obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases; and evidence-based and cost-effective dietary policies.

The event will also feature presentations and posters by students enrolled in the CTS Graduate Program, and the 2017 Clinical and Translational Science Poster Competition.

Schedule

8:00AM – Breakfast

8:30AM – Welcome by David M. Kent, MD, MSc

8:45-9:45AM – Presentations

  • 8:45AM: Jeannie Kelly, MD, MS
  • 9:00AM: Ivan Sisa, MD, MPH, MS
  • 9:15AM: Jung Min Han, PharmD, MS
  • 9:30AM: Bradley Gardiner, MBBS, MS

9:45-10:45AM – Student Poster Session (Atrium) and Clinical & Translational Science Poster Competition (Wolff Auditorium Lobby; winner will be announced at 10:00AM)

10:50-11:35AM – Presentations

  • 10:50AM: Lester Leung, MD, MS
  • 11:05AM: Jinghui Dong, PhD, MS
  • 11:20AM: Elizabeth Schoenfeld, MD, MS

11:35AM – Closing Remarks

12:00PM – Keynote Lecture/Medical Grand Rounds by Dariush Mozaffarian, MD, DrPH, Dean of the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science & Policy.

Seminars & Workshops
Pfizer Investigator Training Program (iTP)

Acclaimed training program begins April 18, 2017

Tufts CTSI will host Pfizer’s acclaimed Investigator Training Program (iTP) on April 18-19, 2017.

This unique, two-day, free-of-charge program will empower clinicians to build critical skills required for the recruitment, management, conduct, and reporting of clinical trials. It will examine the entire trial process, from planning stages to trial close-out activities, and will provide practical recommendations for increasing the efficiency of clinical trial conduct at investigative sites.

Led by clinical trial experts, this interactive training will consist of didactic lectures, discussions, and group activities. The iTP is targeted to investigators and the entire clinical study team, including research fellows, coordinators, research nurses, data managers, regulatory, and IRB members. Clinical trial experience (even if limited) is encouraged, though not required.

Attendees will receive a certificate of attendance after completing this International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH)/Good Clinical Practice (GCP) program. This workshop is approved for 16.5 contact hours towards maintaining an Association of Clinical Research Professionals (ACRP) certification. Contact hours are applicable to CCRCs, CCRAs and CPIs at an entry-level knowledge base.

This is a popular training, and class size is limited, so please pre-register by no later than April 7. You will receive an official email invitation from Pfizer if you are admitted to the program.

Please note: registration is a two-step process. Once you pre-register with Tufts CTSI, you will receive a formal registration form from Pfizer. You must be registered with Pfizer in order to attend this training and receive certification.

Details

Tuesday, April 18, 7:30AM-5:00PM
Wednesday, April 19, 8:30AM-3:30PM
Registration and continental breakfast begin at 8:00AM.

Tufts Center for Medical Education, Room 114
145 Harrison Avenue, Boston MA

Contact

Questions? Please email info@tuftsctsi.org for assistance.

 

Conferences & Symposia
Tufts CTSI-Northeastern Joint Summit: Exercise, Aging, and Cognitive Function

TuftsCTSI-LogoHorizontalRGB

Northeastern logo

 

Want to learn about research from experts in the field and meet potential research collaborators?

The Tufts CTSI-Northeastern Joint Summit Exercise, Aging, and Cognitive Function, is an invitation-only, half-day event that brings together seasoned researchers for a collaborative event showcasing expert research, brainstorming, and networking sessions to build potential collaborations. Featuring an overview by Arthur Kramer, PhD (Northeastern University, Senior Vice Provost for Research & Graduate Education), this event promises to foster connections across institutions.

Details

Wednesday, September 13
9:00AM-2:00PM
Tufts Health Sciences Campus, Boston
(Room location to be announced soon)

Registration

This event is by invitation only.

 

Seminars & Workshops
Mentor Training

Tufts CTSI offers Mentor Training for individuals who mentor junior faculty in research. These interactive, two-hour sessions are funded by Tufts CTSI.

Admission to the training is by application only.

Our Spring 2017 Mentor Training will be on Wednesday, March 29 from 2:00 – 4:00PM. It will be led by Karen Freund, MD, MPH, Vice Chair for Faculty Affairs and Quality Improvement, Tufts Medical Center, and Professor of Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine, and Gordon Huggins, MD, Investigator, Molecular Cardiology Research Institute (MCRI) Center for Translational Genomics, Cardiologist, Preventive Cardiology Center, and Associate Professor, Tufts University School of Medicine.

For more information, please view the Mentor Training web page.

Details

Mentor Training
Wednesday, March 29, 2:00-4:00PM
(Location to be announced)

 

Conferences & Symposia
One Health Symposium

One Health Symposium Slides (PDF)

Interested in Integrating Human, Animal and Environmental Health?

Want to meet collaborators and develop grant proposals?

Join Tufts CTSI for a One Health Workshop on Tuesday, October 4, 9:00AM-1:45PM, at Tufts University School of Dental Medicine, Rachel’s Amphitheater (1 Kneeland Street, 14th Floor, Boston). A live webcast will also be available: the link will only be available to people who RSVP for the event.

Please RSVP here by Friday, September 30.

Agenda

  • 8:30AM: Registration and light breakfast
  • 9:00AM: Introduction
  • 9:30AM: Project presentations
  • 10:30AM: Break
  • 10:45AM: Project presentations
  • 11:45AM: Introduction to breakout sessions
  • 12:00PM: Lunch and group breakout sessions
  • 1:15PM: Report-back, summary, evaluation, and next steps

Topics

The workshop will focus on the following four projects, with the objective of assisting teams to develop proposals for future grant submission:

  • Development of a Safe, Inexpensive, Easily Administered EHEC Vaccine for Cattle
    Project team: John Leong, MD, PhD; Abraham L. Sonenshein, PhD; Saul Tzipori, DVM, PhD, DSc
  • A Novel Approach to Asthma Therapy: Decreasing Airway Smooth Muscle Mass – A One Health Approach Using Naturally Occuring Models of Disease in the Horse and Cat
    Project team: Melissa R. Mazan, DVM; Heber Nielsen, MD
  • Antibiotic Stewardship and Infection Control: Sharing Approaches from Tufts Medical Center and the Foster Hospital for Small Animals at the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, and the Effects of the Human Microbiota Due to Bet Antimicrobial Therapy
    Project team: Shira Doron, MD; Kirthana R. Beaulac, PharmD; Tine Vindenes, MD; Annie Wayne, DVM
  • Cohabitation with Production Animals, Gut Microbiota, and Stunting in Children
    Project team: Janet Forrester, PhD; Honorine Ward, MD; Marieke Rosenbaum, DVM

Proposals address one of the four main areas of One Health:

  • Zoonotic and environmentally-induced diseases
  • Diseases shared by humans and other animals (e.g., cancer, heart disease, obesity, arthritis)
  • Challenges and solutions at the intersection of humans, animals, and the environment
  • Human-animal interactions.

Funding Opportunity

Investigators who attend the One Health workshop may be eligible for planning grants ($500) and pilot grants (up to $5,000) to assemble a team and develop One Health research projects. The criteria and process for applying for these funds will be provided at the Workshop. Sign up by September 30 to attend.

Contact

For more information, please contact John Castellot, PhD, Tufts CTSI Navigator.

Conferences & Symposia
Stakeholder and Community Engagement Symposium

Interested in the science of stakeholder & community engagement?

Want to meet collaborators and develop grant proposals?

Join Tufts CTSI for a Stakeholder and Community Engagement Symposium on Tuesday, March 7, 9:30AM-3:00PM, at Tufts University School of Dental Medicine, Rachel’s Amphitheater (1 Kneeland Street, 14th Floor, Boston).

Please RSVP here by Friday, March 3.

Agenda

  • 9:30AM: Registration and welcome
  • 10:00AM: Introductions
  • 10:30AM: Project presentations
  • 12:30PM: Lunch
  • 1:15PM: Breakout sessions
  • 2:30PM: Report-back, summary, evaluation, and next steps

Topics

The workshop will focus on the following projects, with the objective of assisting teams to develop proposals for future grant submission:

  • Expanding on the science of community-engaged research: Building bridges and strengthening relationships with communities; Linda B. Hudson, ScD, MSPH; Tufts University School of Medicine
  • Family Goals and Preferences for Treatments for Autism Spectrum Disorder; Tara Lavelle, PhD; Tufts Medical Center
  • Effectiveness of Community-Based Diabetes Care Model (C-DCM) in addressing Health Disparities in Immigrant Populations; Mohan Thanikachalam, MD; Tufts University School of Medicine
  • HCV Testing and Treatment Pathways in Jails; Alysse Wurcel, MD, MS; Tufts Medical Center

Contact

For more information, please contact Thomas W. Concannon, PhD, Tufts CTSI Director of Stakeholder and Community Engagement.

 

Seminars & Workshops
Engaging Stakeholders in Community-Based Participatory Research Partnerships

Seminar slides (PDF)

Interested in identifying potential stakeholders in local communities? what are some effective models of academic-community partnerships in translational research?

Join us for for Engaging Stakeholders in Community-Based Participatory Research, a seminar led by Carolyn Rubin, EdD, MA, Tufts CTSI’s Director of Addressing Disparities in Asian Populations through Translational Research (ADAPT) and Assistant Professor at Tufts University School of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Community Medicine.

Dr. Rubin will discuss how researchers and communities can collaborate to identify and address community priorities in translational science.

In this interactive, 90-minute seminar, you will learn what community-based participatory research (CBPR) is, and why you might pursue it.

By the end of this seminar, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the definition and benefits of CBPR
  • Identify strategies for building authentic, long-term partnerships
  • Reflect on your (or your institution’s) relationships with local communities and potential next steps toward CBPR.

Details

Tuesday, February 7, 9:30-11:00AM
Tufts Center for Medical Education, Room 114 East
145 Harrison Avenue, Boston MA

Or via live, interactive webcast (a link will be provided to those who register).

Registration

All are welcome to attend. Please register here by Tuesday, January 31.

 

Seminars & Workshops
Civic Life and Health Research

Civic Life and Health Research seminar slides (PDF)

What is civic life, and why is it important to consider in clinical research? Understand the relevance of civic engagement to clinical and other health research at Civic Life and Health Research, a seminar by Peter Levine, PhD, Associate Dean and Lincoln Filene Professor of Citizenship and Public Affairs at Tufts University’s Jonathan M. Tisch College of Civic Life. Get oriented to current research and debates about civic engagement in the US; challenge the frequent definition of civic engagement as professionals consulting stakeholders; and instead begin to see medical researchers and health professionals as citizens who should relate to other people as fellow citizens.

By the end of this seminar, participants will be able to:

  • Define the concept of civic life and related terms such as civic engagement, social capital, democratic participation, and community engagement from social science perspectives.
  • Value civic engagement as relevant to the clinical research process.
  • Explore differences in theory and practice depending on whether one thinks in terms of clients, patients, stakeholders, communities, publics, or citizens.
  • Illustrate exemplary actions that investigators can take that involve civic life.

Details

Wednesday, January 25, 9:30-11:00AM
Tufts Center for Medical Education, Room 216A
145 Harrison Avenue, Boston MA

Or via live, interactive webcast (a link will be provided to those who register).

Registration

All are welcome to attend. Please register here.

 

Conferences & Symposia
3rd Annual Asian Health Symposium: From Collecting Data to Collective Impact

Symposium slides (PDF)

Overview

Would you like an opportunity for community-building, networking, and learning about research to address Asian health disparities? Mark your calendar for the 3rd Annual Asian Health Symposium: From Collecting Data to Collective Impact. 

This exciting event, free and open to all, is hosted by the Addressing Disparities in Asian Populations Through Translational Research (ADAPT) Program and will include:

  • A panel discussion on the importance of collecting disaggregated and local data.
  • An exploratory session on using the Collective Impact approach for creating a roadmap for Asian community health.
  • Group discussions about health priorities for Asian communities in Chinatown and across Greater Boston.

A light breakfast and lunch will be provided.

Download the event flyer here (PDF).

Details

Tuesday, December 6, 8:30AM-1:30PM
Tufts Center for Medical Education, Room 114
145 Harrison Avenue, Boston

Agenda

  • 8:30AM: Breakfast and registration
  • 9:00AM: Welcome and opening remarks
    • Carolyn Rubin, ADAPT Director, Tufts CTSI
    • Michael Wagner, President and CEO, Tufts Medical Center and Floating Hospital for Children
    • Alice Rushforth, Executive Director, Tufts CTSI
    • Giles Li, Executive Director, Boston Chinatown Neighborhood Center
  • 9:45AM: Plenary Panel: Addressing Asian Health Disparities – Why Collecting Disaggregated Data Matters
    • (moderator) Aviva Must, Morton A. Madoff Professor of Public Health and Chair, Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine
    • (panelist) Carolyn Wong, Research Associate, Institute of Asian American Studies, UMass Boston
    • (panelist) Susan Koch-Weser, Assistant Professor of Public Health and Community Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine
    • (panelist) Eugene Welch, Executive Director, South Cove Community Health Center
    • (panelist) Sherry Dong, Director of Community Health Improvement Programs, Tufts Medical Center
    • (respondent panelist) Tackey Chan, State Representative, Second Norfolk District, MA; Asian American Legislative Caucus
    • (respondent panelist) Ramani Sripada, Co-Chair, Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders in Philanthropy – Boston Chapter
    • (respondent panelist) Monica Valdes Lupi, Executive Director, Boston Public Health Commission
  • 11:00AM: Break
  • 11:15AM: What is Collective Impact? Creating a Roadmap for Achieving Asian Health
  • 12:15PM: Lunch and group discussions on Asian health priorities
  • 1:00PM: Report-back and closing remarks
    • Carolyn Rubin, ADAPT Director, Tufts CTSI

Presenting Organizations

Registration

Please register here to attend.

 

Seminars & Workshops
Mentor Training

Tufts CTSI offers Mentor Training for individuals who mentor graduate students or junior faculty in research. These interactive, two-hour sessions are funded by Tufts CTSI.

Admission to the training is by application only.

Our 2016 Mentor Training will be on Thursday, November 10 from 2:00 – 4:00PM. It will be led by Sarah L. Booth, PhD, Senior Scientist and Director of the Vitamin K Laboratory at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging (HNRCA) and M. Sawkat Anwer, DMVH, PhD, Distinguished Professor and Associate Dean for Research at Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine.

For more information, please view the Mentor Training web page.

Details

Mentor Training
Thursday, November 10, 2:00-4:00PM
Tufts University School of Dental Medicine, Alumni Lounge
1 Kneeland Street, 15th Floor
Boston, MA

 

Seminars & Workshops
CTSA Shared Mentoring Workshop

Agenda

  • 8:00-8:50AM: Breakfast, networking, and registration
  • 8:50AM: Introductions
  • 9:00-10:30AM: Panel discussion, Getting to K and Beyond
  • 10:30-10:45AM: Break
  • 10:45-noon: Exploring Career Opportunities in Translational Science
  • 10:45-noon: One-to-One Mentoring Sessions

RSVP

To attend, please register here.

Details

CTSA Shared Mentoring Workshop
Friday, October 21, 8:00AM-noon
Tufts Center for Medical Education, Room 114
145 Harrison Avenue, Boston MA

This event is hosted by Tufts CTSI and co-sponsored by BU-CTSI, Harvard Catalyst and UMass CTSI.

Seminars & Workshops
Preparing for Patient-Centered and Stakeholder-Engaged Research

Need to incorporate stakeholder engagement into your study, but not sure where to start? Learn how to make your research patient-centered, and find out how engagement fits into your research process at Preparing for Patient-Centered and Stakeholder-Engaged Research. Thomas Concannon, PhD, Tufts CTSI’s Director of Stakeholder and Community Engagement and Assistant Director of Comparative Effectiveness Research, will share his expertise and explain several models for engaging with stakeholders.

By the end of this seminar, participants will be able to:

  • Define patient-centered comparative effectiveness research (CER)
  • Describe the potential value of using Stakeholder and Community Engagement (SCE) and CER frameworks in your research.
  • Identify how engagement fits into the research process based on the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI), Deverka, and Concannon models
  • Discuss the potential value of establishing a partnership with patients
  • Explain how to make your research patient-centered

Details

Tuesday, October 25, 9:30-11:00AM
Tufts Center for Medical Education, Room 114 East
145 Harrison Avenue, Boston MA

Or via live, interactive webcast (a link will be provided to those who register).

Registration

All are welcome to attend. Please register here.

 

Seminars & Workshops
Stakeholder Engagement in Patient-Centered Comparative Effectiveness Research

Seminar slides (PDF)

What is stakeholder and community engagement (SCE), and why is it important? Learn the benefits, strategies, and methods at Stakeholder Engagement in Patient-Centered Comparative Effectiveness Research. This seminar, taught by Thomas Concannon, PhD, Tufts CTSI’s Director of Stakeholder and Community Engagement and Assistant Director of Comparative Effectiveness Research, will review previous patient-centered studies and assess the strengths and weaknesses of their engagement efforts, and their impact on research outcomes.

By the end of this seminar, participants will be able to:

  • Define stakeholder and stakeholder and community engagement (SCE)
  • State different methods for engaging stakeholders and community members in research
  • Outline a framework for SCE utilizing the 7Ps Framework and 6 Stage Model of Comparative Effectiveness Research (CER)
  • Discuss the strengths and weaknesses of SCE in the ACT UP and breast cancer screening guideline examples
  • Identify key lessons learned in the SCE process over time

Details

Wednesday, September 28, 9:30-11:00AM
Tufts Center for Medical Education, 145 Harrison Avenue, Boston MA

Or via live, interactive webcast (a link will be provided to those who register).

Registration

All are welcome to attend. Please register here.

 

Seminars & Workshops
Demystifying Cancer Clinical Trials

Want to learn about, or conduct, cancer clinical trials?

Tufts CTSI and the Cancer Center at Tufts Medical Center are hosting a free 20-hour course for fellows, faculty, research team members, and anyone interested in the process of conducting cancer-related clinical trials.

Documents

Session 1, October 14, 2016
Session 2, November 18, 2016
Session 3, December 16, 2016

Session 4, February 10, 2017

Session 5, March 24, 2017

 

Details

Demystifying Cancer Clinical Trials will take place on Fridays, from 1:00-5:00PM on the Tufts Health Sciences Campus in Boston:

  • October 14 (35 Kneeland Street, 8th Floor, Boston)
  • November 18 (Tufts University Center for Medical Education, Room 114, 145 Harrison Avenue, Boston)
  • December 16 (35 Kneeland Street, 8th Floor, Boston)
  • February 10 (35 Kneeland Street, 8th Floor, Boston)
  • March 24 (35 Kneeland Street, 8th Floor, Boston)

Course sessions will also be videorecorded and posted on Tufts CTSI’s I LEARN website.

Attendees are encouraged to review other courses on I LEARN prior to the start of Demystifying Cancer Clinical Trials.

Goals

At the conclusion of the course, participants will be able to:

  • Explain how to navigate investigator-initiated clinical trial processes in cancer.
  • Discuss how to work with pharmaceutical industries and other for-profit entities.
  • Define investigational new drug (IND) and investigational device exemption (IDE) studies and explain how IND/IDE clinical trials are conducted.
  • State the Principal Investigator’s responsibilities for leading a clinical trial as well as the responsibilities of the research team.

To Register

To attend, sign up here. Participants are encouraged to attend all five sessions.

 

 

Seminars & Workshops
Expert Feedback on NIH Rigor and Transparency Guidelines

Seminar Materials

Seminar Description

Do you have questions about recent changes to National Institutes of Health (NIH) and Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) grant applications regarding scientific rigor and transparency? Get the latest information at Expert Feedback on NIH Rigor and Transparency Guidelines, led by John Castellot, PhD, Tufts CTSI Navigator and NIH Study Section Chair, and Amy Gantt, MA, Tufts University Director of Research Development.

Faculty members who participated in recent NIH study sections will provide valuable feedback and advice on how to include scientific rigor and transparency in your next grant.

Susan Blanchard, Vice President, Research Administration, Tufts Medical Center, will also update participants on the new Department of Labor (DoL) overtime pay protections under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA).

By the end of this seminar, participants will be able to:

  • Describe specific feedback from faculty who served on NIH study sections
  • State how to apply the new guidelines to their grant proposals
  • Discuss how to include scientific rigor and transparency in their grant
  • Explain the implications of the Department of Labor overtime pay protections under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA).

This event is hosted by Tufts University and Tufts Medical Center. Faculty members from both institutions will participate in the discussion.

Details

Thursday, June 23, noon – 1:30PM
Jaharis Family Center for Biomedical Education and Nutrition Sciences, Behrakis Auditorium, 150 Harrison Avenue, Boston MA 02111
Or via live, interactive webcast (a link will be provided to those who register).

Registration

All are welcome to attend. Please register online.

 

Seminars & Workshops
Evaluating Scientific Journal Articles

View the slides for this seminar (PDF).

View the article that will be discussed during this seminar (PDF).

 

What makes a journal article successful?

Join us for Evaluating Scientific Journal Articles and learn the questions you should ask yourself, whether reviewing journal articles or writing your own.

By the end of this seminar you will be able to:

  • List the questions you should ask yourself when evaluating a scientific journal article.
  • Identify the specific, testable hypothesis of the paper.
  • Identify what type of study design was used.
  • Evaluate whether the results of the study were affected by bias.
  • Explain why this study was important, what it added to the literature, or how it changed health practice.
  • Appraise the compatibility of the conclusions of the study with the study objectives.

Details

Thursday, April 28th, 2016 1:00 – 2:30PM
Tufts Center for Medical Education, Room 114
145 Harrison Avenue, Boston

Or via live, interactive webcast (a link will be provided to those who register).

 

Conferences & Symposia
Comparative Effectiveness Research (CER) Workshop

Save the Date!

Interested in comparative effectiveness research (CER)? Want to meet collaborators and develop grant proposals?

Join Tufts CTSI for a CER Workshop on Tuesday, June 21, 9:00AM-4:00PM in room 114 (145 Harrison Avenue, Boston). This interactive event will focus on several CER use cases, with the goal of assisting teams to develop research project proposals for future grant submissions.

Five projects will be presented and discussed:

  • Comparative Effectiveness of Non-Pharmacological Interventions for Osteoarthritis submitted by Raveendhara Bannuru MD, FAGE, Tufts Medical Center
  • Improving Provider Adherence to Diabetes Screening Guidelines for Asians submitted by Susan Koch-Weser ScM, ScD, Tufts University School of Medicine
  • Emergency Buprenorphine/Naloxone Treatment submitted by Martin Krsak, MD, MSc, Lemuel Shattuck Hospital
  • Associations of Provider Prescribing Patterns and Future Opioid use in Patients Presenting to the Emergency Department with an Acute Painful Condition submitted by William Soares, MD MS, Baystate Medical Center
  • Health Effects of Oral Protein Supplements in HemoDialysis (The HELPS-HD Trial) submitted by Dan Weiner, MD, Tufts CTSI

All are welcome to attend! Please RSVP here.

Additional details about the CER Workshop will be available on this page soon.

Conferences & Symposia
18th Annual Clinical and Translational Science Graduate Program Symposium

Overview

The 18th Annual Clinical and Translational Science (CTS) Graduate Program Symposium will be Friday, May 20, 8:00AM-1:00PM in Wolff Auditorium at Tufts Medical Center (800 Washington Street, Boston).

This year’s keynote speaker is Joe V. Selby, MD, MPH, Executive Director of the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI). A family physician, clinical epidemiologist, and health services researcher, Dr. Selby has more than 35 years of experience in patient care, research, and administration. He is responsible for identifying strategic issues and opportunities for PCORI and implementing and administering programs authorized by the PCORI Board of Governors.

The event will also feature presentations and posters by students enrolled in the CTS Graduate Program, and the 2016 Clinical and Translational Science Poster Competition.

Schedule

8:00AM – Welcome

8:15-9:45AM – Presentations

  • 8:15AM: Angie Mae C. Rodday, MS, PhD, Predicting Health Care Utilization for Children with Respiratory Insufficiency using Parent-proxy Ratings of Children’s Health-related Quality of Life
  • 8:30AM: Robert M. Blanton, MD, MS, Downstream Substrates of Protein Kinase G as Novel Anti-remodeling Molecules
  • 8:45AM: Nadi Nina Kaonga, MHS, MS, HIV Medication Adherence in Namibia: The Potential for an Early Intervention
  • 9:00AM: Masako Mizusawa, MD, PhD, MS, Changes in Mortality and Length of Stay for Aspergillosis-Related Hospitalizations in the United States from 2001 to 2011
  • 9:15AM: Amanda K. Leonberg-Yoo, MD, MS, Association of Urine Sodium with Progression of Kidney Disease, Incident Heart Failure, Incident Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease, and All-cause Mortality
  • 9:30AM: Rita L. McGill, MD, MS, PICC, Imaging, and Dialysis Vascular Access

9:45-10:15AM – Student Poster Session and Clinical & Translational Science Poster Competition

10:15-11:45AM – Presentations

  • 10:15AM: Nadine Al-Naamani, MD, MS, The Association of Systemic Arterial Properties with Right Ventricular Morphology: The MESA-Right Ventricle Study
  • 10:30AM: Nelya Melnitchouk, MD, MS, Screening for Colorectal Cancer in Low to Middle Income Countries, Cost Effectiveness Analysis, Example of Ukraine
  • 10:45AM: Marzieh Essaty Mirhashemi, PhD, MS, Transcriptome Analysis of Cryptosporidium parvum in vitro 
  • 11:00AM: Deborah E. Linder, DVM, MS, A Mixed-Methods Evaluation of the Child-Dog Relationship in Healthy Weight and Overweight/Obese Children
  • 11:15AM: Jonathan M. Babyak, DVM, MS, Prevalent and Incident Kidney Injury in Dogs at a Veterinary Teaching Hospital
  • 11:30AM: Benjamin S. Wessler, MD, MS, Evaluating Performance of Heart Failure Predictive Models

11:45AM – Closing Remarks

12:00PM – Keynote Lecture/Medical Grand Rounds by Joe V. Selby, MD, MPH, Executive Director, Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI), Patient-Centered Comparative Effectiveness Research, or PCORI: We’ve Had a Slight Change of Plans

Dissertation Defense
Utilizing Patient-Reported Outcomes to Assess the Impact of Complex Medical Disorders in Children

Tufts CTSI and the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences invite you to a dissertation defense by Angie Mae Rodday, MS, a PhD candidate in Clinical and Translational Science. She will defend her thesis, Utilizing Patient-Reported Outcomes to Assess the Impact of Complex Medical Disorders in Children, on Tuesday, December 22, 2:00-4:00PM in room 221 (145 Harrison Avenue, Boston).

Seminars & Workshops
Planning for NIH and AHRQ Grant Application Changes

Seminar slides

Seminar handout

Do you know about the planned changes to policies, forms and instructions for National Institutes of Health (NIH) and Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) grant applications submitted in 2016? Beginning in January, these changes will impact how you develop and write your research strategy section. In addition, there are form and format changes to the SF424 application package.

Find out more information and specific details at Planning for NIH/AHRQ Grant Application Changes, led by Tufts University’s Zoya Davis-Hamilton, EdD, CRA, Senior Associate Director of Research Administration and Amy Gantt, MA, the Director of Research Development.

This seminar reviews upcoming changes to rigor and transparency in research, inclusion reporting, data safety monitoring, vertebrate animals, definition of child, research training, appendices, biosketch clarifications, font requirements and post-award changes.

The seminar is split into two sections, the first half will focus on the changes to the research strategy section of the application and the second half will focus on the administrative changes.

By the end of this seminar, participants will be able to:

  • Identify the changes to the NIH/AHRQ policies, instructions and forms
  • Explain which changes are required in January 2016 and which changes will be required in May 2016
  • State details on each area of change
  • Describe how to apply the new guidelines
  • Discuss how to include robust and unbiased results factoring.

This event was hosted by Tufts University and Tufts Medical Center.

 

Conferences & Symposia
Translational Research Day 2015: Innovations in Clinical Trial Participant Engagement

Download the slides for Translational Research Day here.

Why do people participate in clinical studies and trials? What are the challenges to recruiting human and animal research participants, and how can we overcome them? Find out at Tufts CTSI’s Translational Research Day 2015: Innovations in Clinical Trial Participant Engagement.

Tuesday, November 10
8:30AM-4:00PM
Tufts Center for Medical Education, Room 114
145 Harrison Avenue, Boston (or via live webcast)

Please register to attend.

The day will include:

  • 8:30AM: Registration

  • 9:00AM: Welcome

  • 9:15AM: Keynote Address

    • The mPower App and Using Technology Tools for Participant Engagement in Clinical Trials
      Karl D. Kieburtz, MD, MPH, Director of the Clinical & Translational Science Institute at the University of Rochester Medical Center
  • 10:00AM: Participant Engagement: Why Participate in Research?

    • Participation in Clinical Research: Motivations and Perspectives
      Julia Farides-Mitchell, MA, the Center for Information & Study on Clinical Research Participation (CISCRP)
    • Challenges and Rewards of Engaging Pet Owners in Clinical Trials in Veterinary Medicine
      Andrew M. Hoffman, DVM, DVSc, Diplomate, ACVIM, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University
    • Challenges in Enrolling and Consenting Pregnant Women, Children and Neonates in Clinical Trials
      Jonathan Davis, MD, Tufts CTSI and Chief of Newborn Medicine, Floating Hospital for Children at Tufts Medical Center
  • 11:00AM: Break

  • 11:15AM: Innovative Recruitment Strategies

    • Using Social Media for Participant Engagement in Clinical Trials: A Pilot Study
      Laura L. Blaisdell, MD, Maine Medical Center
    • Recruitment in Social Behavioral Research (Dear Abby and More)
      Debra Lerner, PhD, Tufts CTSI and Tufts University
    • Using an Expert Panel to Randomize Patients in a Cervical Spondolytic Myelopathy Clinical Trial
      Zoher Ghogawala, MD, Lahey Hospital and Medical Center
  • 12:15PM: Summary Remarks: the Future of Participant Engagement in Clinical Trials

  • 12:30PM: Lunch and Poster Session

  • 1:30PM: Challenges in Participant Engagement

    • Using Research Process Improvement to Solve Recruitment Challenges
      Denise Daudelin, RN, MPH, Tufts CTSI and Tufts Medical Center
      Donato Rivas, MD, Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging
  • 2:15PM: Small Group Discussions

    • Challenges and Solutions
    • Comparative Effectiveness Research Grant Teams
  • 3:15PM: Report Back/Panel Discussion

  • 3:45PM: Summary Remarks

Submissions for the Poster Session are due by November 2.

Seminars & Workshops
Knowing Yourself & Knowing Others: Implications for Leadership and Team Participation

How well do you know yourself? Find out how your approach to the world influences your motivation, leadership, and team participation at Knowing Yourself and Knowing Others: Implications for Leadership and Team Participation.

This workshop by Laurel K. Leslie, MD, MPH, former Tufts CTSI Associate Director for Community Engagement and current Vice President of Research at the American Board of Pediatrics Research, was previously offered in the Women in Medicine/Science Lecture Series and as part of the Community Service Learning Series for medical students.

To learn more about yourself and your interactions with others at this interactive and fun event, please register.

Friday, January 15, 2016, 3:00 – 5:00PM
Tufts Center for Medical Education, Room 114
145 Harrison Avenue, Boston MA

Or via live, interactive webcast (a link will be provided to those who register).