Seminars & Workshops
Center for Quantitative Methods and Data Science Seminar: Karl Broman, PhD

Interested in learning how to make your data analysis and other scientific computations reproducible?

The Center for Quantitative Methods and Data Science, in partnership with the Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Research Design (BERD) Center and the Data-Intensive Studies Center (DISC) will host a virtual seminar series on a Wednesday each month from 2:00-3:00PM.

The session on Wednesday, December 16 will feature Karl Broman, PhD. He will give a talk titled Steps Toward Reproducible Research.

Abstract

A minimal standard for data analysis and other scientific computations is that they be reproducible: that the code and data are assembled in a way so that another group can re-create all of the results (e.g., the figures and table in a paper). Adopting a workflow that will make your results reproducible will ultimately make your life easier; if a problem or question arises somewhere down the line, it will be much easier to correct or explain.

But organizing analyses so that they are reproducible is not easy. It requires diligence and a considerable investment of time: to learn new computational tools, and to organize and document analyses as you go. Nevertheless, partially reproducible is better than not at all reproducible. Just try to make your next paper or project better organized than the last. There are many paths toward reproducible research, and you shouldn’t try to change all aspects of your current practices all at once. Identify one weakness, adopt an improved approach, refine that a bit, and then move on to the next thing. Dr. Karl Broman will offer some suggestions for the initial steps to take towards making your work reproducible.

Faculty

Dr. Karl Broman is a Professor in the Department of Biostatistics & Medical Informatics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Dr. Broman is an applied statistician working on the genetics of complex diseases in experimental organisms. He develops the R package, R/qtl, has written a number of short tutorials useful for data scientists, and is very keen to develop tools for interactive data visualization (to view an example, click here).

Details

Date: Wednesday, December 16, 2020, 2:00-3:00PM

Registration

To attend, please enroll via Tufts CTSI I LEARN here.

 

Seminars & Workshops
Taking Responsibility for Building a Trustworthy Research Enterprise

What is your role in being an anti-racist researcher and creating a trustworthy research enterprise?

This webinar will focus on looking at the history of malfeasance in research including up to the present day. We will explore how mistrust of research is mediated through historical and generational trauma and how it impacts present day perceptions of research. We will discuss how we can flip the narrative around mistrust of research as a “barrier” to focus on what researchers can do to become more trustworthy. We will outline specific steps you can take to bring awareness to your labs and study teams to engage in anti-racism and anti-oppression in your work.

You will come away with concrete steps that you can take, resources you can utilize, and continued support from Tufts CTSI to engage in dialogue with your teams and colleagues.

Details

Date: December 9, 2020, noon-1:00PM

Location: I LEARN course management system

Registration

Enroll in Taking Responsibility for Building a Trustworthy Research Enterprise.

Seminars & Workshops
Scientific Manuscript Writing Workshops – Fall 2020

Overview

Need to transform your ideas into a publishable manuscript? Finding it difficult to write alone without assistance and feedback?

Join Tufts CTSI this fall to begin writing and refining the core sections of your manuscript draft with your colleagues and with an experienced editor.

Commit to attending four working sessions and getting your own manuscript draft, and those of your peers, reviewed before each session. Optional service requests are available for one-on-one consultations on general English writing and peer review.

Dates and Location

All sessions will take place online via Zoom (a link will be provided to those who register), on Wednesdays from 10:30AM-noon.

  • Session I: Wednesday, October 28, 10:30-12:00PM
  • Session II: Wednesday, November 11, 10:30-12:00PM
  • Session III: Wednesday, November 25, 10:30-12:00PM
  • Session IV: Wednesday, December 9, 10:30-12:00PM

Registration and Requirements

Ten slots are available for those who commit to attending and submitting their manuscript drafts prior to all four sessions. You do not need to have your actual final study results or references available to get the essential work done, but it would be beneficial for you to have some elements of a work in progress available for review such as the introduction, methods, or results section of a clinical/translational research paper.

Please register here.

The first assignment is due by Wednesday, October 28:

  • Reading: Welch HG (1999) Preparing manuscripts for submission to medical journals: the paper trail. Eff Clin Pract 2:131–137
  • Submit your first draft in Word to ctsitraining@tuftsmedicalcenter.org. Minimum requirements:
    • One- two paragraphs for the Introduction section
    • Several paragraphs for the Methods and/or Results sections, with subheadings
    • Two to three draft tables or figures that illustrate your principal study findings, even if you don’t have the actual final data available at this time
  • Subsequent drafts and peer review are due three business days prior to each session.
Details

Tufts CTSI is excited to recruit up to 10 motivated biomedical and clinical researchers to join a hands-on workshop series designed to get you started on efficient manuscript writing. Don’t miss this chance for face time with Robert Goldberg, PhD to hear his advice on the elements of preparing successful manuscripts for peer reviewed scientific journals including  navigating major journals, scientific writing style, and approaches to sentence composition.

The program is focused solely on hands-on writing exercises and peer review with expert coaching on manuscript style and content. The participants will incorporate class feedback and submit a new draft each session with a goal of polishing each section of their scientific manuscript in the IMRAD (Introduction, Methods, Results, and Discussion) format.

By the end of the series, you will have completed a solid working draft of a manuscript that will be either ready for peer reviewed submission to a journal, or will be close to submission with some additional final polishing needed.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this workshop series, you should be able to:

  • Discuss the core components of a successful scientific manuscript.
  • Identify strategies and steps for completing a full manuscript for peer review submission.
  • Anticipate reviewers’ concerns in discussing and presenting your research and how to best respond to these concerns.

Workshop Faculty

  • Instructor: Robert J. Goldberg, PhD, Professor, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Department of Population and Quantitative Health Sciences
  • Guest instructor: Nicholas Moustakas, MA, Research Development Specialist, Tufts CTSI

Expectations for Homework and Your Commitment

Registration is on a first come, first served basis and priorities are given to members of Tufts CTSI partner institutions. Once the course is full, additional registrants will be put on a waitlist and invited to the next available opportunity. We will confirm your enrollment as soon we finalize the registration list.

Class attendance is critical to this peer review-based format. If your participation in these workshops needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may optionally provide their contact information when you register for the workshop program.

You will be expected to be actively engaged in classroom discussion. We ask participants to come open-minded and be receptive to constructive feedback.

Tufts CTSI Professional Education & Expectations for Course Participants

Tufts CTSI’s Professional Education programs provide non-degree continuing education and training for clinical and translational research professionals from all Tufts CTSI partners and beyond.

Course enrollment priority is given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions. If your participation needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may provide their contact information when you register for the program.

This course is provided free of charge and is supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Award Number UL1TR002544.  The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

 

Seminars & Workshops
Center for Quantitative Methods and Data Sciences Seminar: Cody Meissner, MD and Norma Terrin, PhD

The Center for Quantitative Methods and Data Sciences, in partnership with the Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Research Design (BERD) Center and the Data-Intensive Studies Center (DISC) will host a Zoom seminar series on a Wednesday each month from 2:00-3:00PM.

The October session on Wednesday, October 21 will feature Cody Meissner, MD, and Norma Terrin, PhD. They will speak about the promise of COVID-19 vaccines in controlling the pandemic.

Abstract

The discussion will cover approaches to SARS-CoV-2 vaccine development; emergency use authorization (EUA) vs. biologic license application (BLA); acceptable safety and effectiveness; unanticipated serious adverse reactions that occurred following introduction of previous vaccines; and vaccine trial sample size justification.

Faculty

Dr. Meissner is Professor of Pediatrics at Tufts University School of Medicine and Head of the Pediatric Infectious Disease Service at Tufts Medical Center. He is a Consultant to the Committee on Infectious Disease and an Associate Editor of the Red Book for the American Academy of Pediatrics. He has served as a member of the Advisory Committee on Infectious Diseases (ACIP) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and continues to advise CDC Work Groups. He presently serves as a member of the National vaccine Advisory Committee (NVAC) and as a member of the Vaccines and Related Biologic Products Advisory Committee (VRBPAC) for the Food and Drug Administration. He serves as a member of the Massachusetts Vaccine Purchasing Council. He has published over 250 papers on various aspects of infectious disease.

Dr. Terrin is the Scientific Director of the BERD Center at Tufts Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI) and Professor at Tufts University School of Medicine. She has collaborated with clinical investigators, including infectious disease researchers, throughout her career, and she served as Statistics Editor at Clinical Infectious Diseases for 12 years.

Details

Date: Wednesday, October 21, 2020, 2:00-3:00PM

Location: Zoom video conference. To receive the Zoom link and passcode, please email Lori Lyn Price, MAS at lprice1@tuftsmedicalcenter.org.

 

 

Seminars & Workshops
Disseminating Research Results to Participants and the Public – Session 3

Does your study follow the best practice of communicating end results to participants? Are you disseminating findings to affected communities that are understandable and actionable?

The new Common Rule (NIH 2017) emphasizes the need for clinical research investigators and teams to provide participants with information they can read, understand and act on. In a recent survey of past clinical trial participants (CISCRP 2019), 68% said they wanted to receive a post-study summary of results they could understand and use, but only 38% reported receiving any such communication.

In this asynchronous, online workshop, participants will learn about health literacy and plain language as a strategic effort to communicate more clearly throughout the clinical research life cycle, practice plain language writing and design techniques to communicate end of study findings, and engage in dialogue and reflection on how to apply lessons learned in practice.

Details

Date: Access course materials at any time from December 2 through December 9, 2020.

Location: I LEARN course management system

Audience: Clinical research investigators and coordinators, and anyone on the clinical research team responsible for communicating results to study participants, are encouraged to attend, especially investigators and study teams with results ready to share.

If you are an investigator with experience sharing study results with study participants and the public, please contact sabrina.kurtz_rossi@tufts.edu so that we may incorporate your experience, questions, and challenges into the content of the training.

To join in this asynchronous training, participants must be able to access the Internet. Participants will be asked to log onto the I LEARN course management system to access all training materials.

Course enrollment priority is given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions.
If your participation needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may provide their contact information when you register for the program.

Registration

Enroll in Dissemination of Research Results to Participants and the Public.

 

Seminars & Workshops
Disseminating Research Results to Participants and the Public – Session 2

Does your study follow the best practice of communicating end results to participants? Are you disseminating findings to affected communities that are understandable and actionable?

The new Common Rule (NIH 2017) emphasizes the need for clinical research investigators and teams to provide participants with information they can read, understand and act on. In a recent survey of past clinical trial participants (CISCRP 2019), 68% said they wanted to receive a post-study summary of results they could understand and use, but only 38% reported receiving any such communication.

Applying a health literacy framework supports study teams to meet the literacy, language, and cultural health communication needs of participants and the public. Using plain language writing and design principles enables study teams to develop results summaries that are relevant, understand and actionable.

This 90-minute online workshop, Disseminating Research Results to Participants and the Public, is led by health literacy and plain language experts from Tufts CTSI faculty, along with guest lectures from the Multi-Regional Clinical Trials (MRCT) Center of Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard and the Center for Information & Study on Clinical Research Participation (CISCRP). Participants will learn about health literacy and plain language as a strategic effort to communicate more clearly throughout the clinical research life cycle, practice plain language writing and design techniques to communicate end of study findings, and engage in dialogue and reflection on how to apply lessons learned in practice.

The workshop will use Zoom video conferencing for live interactive learning and the I LEARN course management system to support applied asynchronous learning activities. This online program will be engaging, interactive, and tailored to meet participant needs.

After attending this event, participants should be able to:

  • Define health literacy and plain language as a strategic approach to communication throughout the clinical research life cycle, with a focus on sharing post-study results with participants and the community
  • Apply plain language writing and design principles when crafting written communications at the close of a study that are tailored to needs of study participants and the public (i.e. drafting a letter to participants describing aggregate results or a one-page fact sheets describing relevant findings to the public).

Faculty

Sabrina Kurtz-Rossi, MEd, is Assistant Professor of Public Health and Community Medicine at Tufts University School of Medicine. Kurtz-Rossi has extensive experience teaching with technology and creating engaging and tailored remote learning experiences. She will introduce the fundamentals of health literacy and plain language in health and science communication with the public.

Sylvia Baedorf Kassis, MPH, is Program Manager for Health Literacy in Clinical Research at the Multi-Regional Clinical Trials (MRCT) Center of Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard. Baedorf Kassis will cover health literacy throughout the clinical research life cycle and specifically techniques for communicating results to study participants.

Behtash Bahador, MS, is Associate Director of Relationship Management and Development at the Center for Information & Study on Clinical Research Participation (CISCRP). Bahador will offer further specific guidance and resources on the return of results and will use case examples to facilitate communication of research results to affected communities.

Details

Date: Wednesday, November 4, 2020, 10:00–11:30AM (90 min)

Location: Zoom video conference and I LEARN course management system

Clinical research investigators and coordinators, and anyone on the clinical research team responsible for communicating results to study participants, are encouraged to attend, especially investigators and study teams with results ready to share.

If you are an investigator with experience sharing study results with study participants and the public, please contact sabrina.kurtz_rossi@tufts.edu so that we may incorporate your experience, questions, and challenges into the content of the training.

To join in this live, 90-minute online event, participants must be able to access the Internet using a device with audio and video camera capabilities. Participants will receive an invitation to join the training live via Zoom and to log onto the I LEARN course management system to access all training materials. Please join the training from a location that has reliable internet access and limited background noise.

Course enrollment priority is given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions.

If your participation needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may provide their contact information when you register for the program.

Registration

To attend, please register here.

Tufts CTSI Professional Education & Expectations for Course Participants

Tufts CTSI’s Professional Education programs provide non-degree continuing education and training for clinical and translational research professionals from all Tufts CTSI partners and beyond.

Course enrollment priority is given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions. If your participation needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may provide their contact information when you register for the program.

This course is provided free of charge and is supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Award Number UL1TR002544.  The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

Seminars & Workshops
Center for Quantitative Methods and Data Sciences Seminar: Karin Knudson, PhD

The Center for Quantitative Methods and Data Sciences, in partnership with the Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Research Design (BERD) Center and the Data-Intensive Studies Center (DISC) will host a Zoom seminar series on the fourth Wednesday of the month from 2:00-3:00PM.

The first session on Wednesday, September 23 will feature Karin Knudson, PhD, Senior Data Scientist with DISC. She will speak about the estimation of ataxia severity and disease classification from wearable sensor recordings.

Abstract

Wearable sensor data offer the potential for rich and interpretable descriptions of behavioral characteristics of ataxia and other neurodegenerative diseases. High quality behavioral biomarkers are important for understanding disease progression, assessing efficacy in clinical trials, and supporting early diagnosis and targeted interventions. In this talk we present methods for using accelerometer and gyroscope time series data from wearable sensors in order to accurately distinguish patients with ataxia from healthy controls and to estimate disease severity. We combine information from an autoregressive hidden Markov model variant and time-frequency analysis to create a flexible, extensible, and meaningful quantitative description of movement and to perform severity estimation and disease classification with short periods of data collection.

Faculty

Dr. Knudson is a Senior Data Scientist with the Tufts Data Intensive Studies Center (DISC). Her research has involved the development and application of methods from machine learning, Bayesian statistics, and compressive sensing, particularly to neural data. Before joining Tufts, she was a Research Fellow in the Department of Neurology at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, and was previously the Chair of the Department of Mathematics, Statistics, and Computer Science at Phillips Academy. She completed her PhD in Mathematics at the University of Texas at Austin.

Details

Date: Wednesday, September 23, 2020, 2:00-3:00PM

Location: Zoom video conference. To receive the Zoom link and passcode, please email Lori Lyn Price, MAS at lprice1@tuftsmedicalcenter.org.

 

 

Seminars & Workshops
Disseminating Research Results to Participants and the Public

Does your study follow the best practice of communicating end results to participants? Are you disseminating findings to affected communities that are understandable and actionable?

The new Common Rule (NIH 2017) emphasizes the need for clinical research investigators and teams to provide participants with information they can read, understand and act on. In a recent survey of past clinical trial participants (CISCRP 2019), 68% said they wanted to receive a post-study summary of results they could understand and use, but only 38% reported receiving any such communication.

Applying a health literacy framework supports study teams to meet the literacy, language, and cultural health communication needs of participants and the public. Using plain language writing and design principles enables study teams to develop results summaries that are relevant, understand and actionable.

This 90-minute online workshop, Disseminating Research Results to Participants and the Public, is led by health literacy and plain language experts from Tufts CTSI faculty, along with guest lectures from the Multi-Regional Clinical Trials (MRCT) Center of Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard and the Center for Information & Study on Clinical Research Participation (CISCRP). Participants will learn about health literacy and plain language as a strategic effort to communicate more clearly throughout the clinical research life cycle, practice plain language writing and design techniques to communicate end of study findings, and engage in dialogue and reflection on how to apply lessons learned in practice.

The workshop will use Zoom video conferencing for live interactive learning and the I LEARN course management system to support applied asynchronous learning activities. This online program will be engaging, interactive, and tailored to meet participant needs.

After attending this event, participants should be able to:

  • Define health literacy and plain language as a strategic approach to communication throughout the clinical research life cycle, with a focus on sharing post-study results with participants and the community
  • Apply plain language writing and design principles when crafting written communications at the close of a study that are tailored to needs of study participants and the public (i.e. drafting a letter to participants describing aggregate results or a one-page fact sheets describing relevant findings to the public).

Faculty

Sabrina Kurtz-Rossi, MEd, is Assistant Professor of Public Health and Community Medicine at Tufts University School of Medicine. Kurtz-Rossi has extensive experience teaching with technology and creating engaging and tailored remote learning experiences. She will introduce the fundamentals of health literacy and plain language in health and science communication with the public.

Sylvia Baedorf Kassis, MPH, is Program Manager for Health Literacy in Clinical Research at the Multi-Regional Clinical Trials (MRCT) Center of Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard. Baedorf Kassis will cover health literacy throughout the clinical research life cycle and specifically techniques for communicating results to study participants.

Behtash Bahador, MS, is Associate Director of Relationship Management and Development at the Center for Information & Study on Clinical Research Participation (CISCRP). Bahador will offer further specific guidance and resources on the return of results and will use case examples to facilitate communication of research results to affected communities.

Details

Date: Wednesday, October 7, 2020, 10:00–11:30 noon (90 min)

Location: Zoom video conference and I LEARN course management system

Clinical research investigators and coordinators, and anyone on the clinical research team responsible for communicating results to study participants, are encouraged to attend, especially investigators and study teams with results ready to share.

If you are an investigator with experience sharing study results with study participants and the public, please contact sabrina.kurtz_rossi@tufts.edu so that we may incorporate your experience, questions, and challenges into the content of the training.

To join in this live, 90-minute online event, participants must be able to access the Internet using a device with audio and video camera capabilities. Participants will receive an invitation to join the training live via Zoom and to log onto the I LEARN course management system to access all training materials. Please join the training from a location that has reliable internet access and limited background noise.

Course enrollment priority is given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions.

If your participation needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may provide their contact information when you register for the program.

Registration

To attend, please register here.

Tufts CTSI Professional Education & Expectations for Course Participants

Tufts CTSI’s Professional Education programs provide non-degree continuing education and training for clinical and translational research professionals from all Tufts CTSI partners and beyond.

Course enrollment priority is given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions. If your participation needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may provide their contact information when you register for the program.

This course is provided free of charge and is supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Award Number UL1TR002544.  The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

Seminars & Workshops
Research Database Development Part 3: Advanced REDCap Features

Overview

Are you involved in building a REDCap database for your research project?

Building an appropriate database for your study is critical to ensuring successful data collection and analysis. Learn how to build your database in this three-part Research Database Development course presented by Tufts CTSI. There are no pre-requisites required for any of the three course registrations, but participation in all three courses is encouraged as they build on each other.

Part 3: Advanced REDCap Features

This two-hour session will begin with a demonstration of commonly used advanced REDCap features, led by Ethan Goldstein, Informatics Project Coordinator at Tufts CTSI, followed by an interactive conversation answering participants’ real-life REDCap questions.

Topics covered include:

  • Complex piping and calculations within REDCap forms
  • Establishing workflows with the Survey Queue and Alerts and Notifications sections
  • Understanding how Action Tags can be used to help guide data collection
  • Ensuring high-quality input by establishing Data Quality rules

After attending this session, participants should be able to:

  • Identify use cases for advanced REDCap features
  • Implement commonly-used advanced features in REDCap projects

Details

Date: Friday, August 28, 10:00AM-noon

Location: online via Zoom

Registration

Members of any Tufts CTSI-affiliated institution are welcome to attend.

To receive the Zoom link, please register here.

Instructors

Rachael Huebner, MPH is the Clinical Data Manager at Tufts CTSI, providing data management support and training to researchers. Prior to joining Tufts, she worked in data management for industry-sponsored clinical trials after receiving her MPH from Boston University School of Public Health.

Ethan Goldstein is a Project Coordinator for the Informatics team at Tufts CTSI. He is responsible for REDCap user and application support. Ethan has been involved in REDCap database development for more than four years. He started at Brigham and Women’s Hospital where he designed REDCap-based systems for issue tracking and subject recruitment. He is a native of Boston, and a graduate of Clark University with a degree in Biology.

Tufts CTSI Professional Education & Expectation for Course Participants

Tufts CTSI’s Professional Education programs provide non-degree continuing education and training for clinical and translational research professionals from all Tufts CTSI partners and beyond.

Course enrollment priority is given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions. If your participation needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may provide their contact information when you register for the program.

This course is provided free of charge, and was supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of health, Award Number UL1TR002544. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

 

Seminars & Workshops
Research Database Development Part 2: Building a REDCap Database

Overview

Are you involved in building a REDCap database for your research project?

Building an appropriate database for your study is critical to ensuring successful data collection and analysis. Learn how to build your database in this three-part Research Database Development course presented by Tufts CTSI. There are no pre-requisites required for any of the three course registrations, but participation in all three courses is encouraged as they build on each other.

Part 2: Building a REDCap Database

This two-hour session will consist of a guided tutorial led by Ethan Goldstein, Informatics Project Coordinator at Tufts CTSI, followed by a discussion on building REDCap databases for your own research. Participants should be prepared to discuss their research projects. Instructors will work with you to create REDCap accounts prior to this session.

Topics covered include:

  • Introduction to REDCap
  • Creating projects, forms, and fields
  • Exporting data

After attending this session, participants should be able to:

  • Describe the differences between classic and longitudinal projects, and identify when to use each
  • Create projects, forms, and fields in REDCap
  • Export data from REDCap to Excel

Details

Date: Thursday, August 27, 10:00AM-noon

Location: online via Zoom

Registration

Members of any Tufts CTSI-affiliated institution are welcome to attend.

To receive the Zoom link, please register here.

Instructors

Rachael Huebner, MPH is the Clinical Data Manager at Tufts CTSI, providing data management support and training to researchers. Prior to joining Tufts, she worked in data management for industry-sponsored clinical trials after receiving her MPH from Boston University School of Public Health.

Ethan Goldstein is a Project Coordinator for the Informatics team at Tufts CTSI. He is responsible for REDCap user and application support. Ethan has been involved in REDCap database development for more than four years. He started at Brigham and Women’s Hospital where he designed REDCap-based systems for issue tracking and subject recruitment. He is a native of Boston, and a graduate of Clark University with a degree in Biology.

Tufts CTSI Professional Education & Expectation for Course Participants

Tufts CTSI’s Professional Education programs provide non-degree continuing education and training for clinical and translational research professionals from all Tufts CTSI partners and beyond.

Course enrollment priority is given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions. If your participation needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may provide their contact information when you register for the program.

This course is provided free of charge, and was supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of health, Award Number UL1TR002544. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

 

Seminars & Workshops
Research Database Development Part 1: Basics & Best Practices

Overview

Are you involved in building a REDCap database for your research project?

Building an appropriate database for your study is critical to ensuring successful data collection and analysis. Learn how to build your database in this three-part Research Database Development course presented by Tufts CTSI. There are no pre-requisites required for any of the three course registrations, but participation in all three courses is encouraged as they build on each other.

Part 1: Basics & Best Practices

This two-hour session will begin with an interactive lecture presented by Rachael Huebner, MPH, Clinical Data Manager at Tufts CTSI, followed by a workshop in which participants will practice building a simple database in Excel. Participation will be required for the workshop portion.

Pre-requisite: none

Topics covered include:

  • Database development best practices
  • Determining which data to collect
  • Choosing variable types
  • Naming variables
  • Assigning numbers to variables
  • Using Excel to create a database

After attending this session, participants should be able to:

  • Recognize database creation best practices
  • Identify the clinical and demographic data needed to answer a study question
  • Effectively name and code variables
  • Create an Excel sheet appropriate for study data collection

Details

Date: Wednesday, August 26, 10:00AM-noon

Location: online via Zoom

Registration

Members of any Tufts CTSI-affiliated institution are welcome to attend.

To receive the Zoom link, please register here.

Instructors

Rachael Huebner, MPH is the Clinical Data Manager at Tufts CTSI, providing data management support and training to researchers. Prior to joining Tufts, she worked in data management for industry-sponsored clinical trials after receiving her MPH from Boston University School of Public Health.

Ethan Goldstein is a Project Coordinator for the Informatics team at Tufts CTSI. He is responsible for REDCap user and application support. Ethan has been involved in REDCap database development for more than four years. He started at Brigham and Women’s Hospital where he designed REDCap-based systems for issue tracking and subject recruitment. He is a native of Boston, and a graduate of Clark University with a degree in Biology.

Tufts CTSI Professional Education & Expectation for Course Participants

Tufts CTSI’s Professional Education programs provide non-degree continuing education and training for clinical and translational research professionals from all Tufts CTSI partners and beyond.

Course enrollment priority is given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions. If your participation needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may provide their contact information when you register for the program.

This course is provided free of charge, and was supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of health, Award Number UL1TR002544. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

 

Seminars & Workshops
Foundations of Team Science Workshop

Are you an investigator interested in learning practical skills for working on team-based research projects?


Contemporary biomedical and health research grants often involve more than a single principal investigator (PI) or working with the lab down the hall. Whether focused on a public health strategy or a novel treatment, scientists increasingly find they need to work as part of a team with collaborators from different disciplines, institutions, and communities.

To help researchers succeed in a team-based environment, Tufts Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI) and the Tufts University Office of Research Development are offering a workshop on team science fundamentals. Developed with the assistance ofthe Tufts Technology Services Design Practice, the intensive four-hour training provides an evidence-based framework for effective collaboration planning. Participants will gain practical skills for building cohesive teams and strategies that are adaptable to diverse research domains and settings.

By the end of this interactive symposium, event participants should be able to:

  • Understand the importance of team science skills to successful research outcomes
  • Understand the team science competencies needed for building new research teams
  • Use tools and strategies for:
    • Formulating shared goals and vision
    • Understanding individual contributions, opportunities for collaboration, and gaps within the team
    • Creating a collaboration plan.

Details

Wednesday, September 30, 2020, 10:00 –11:30AM, and
Wednesday, October 7, 2020, 10:00am –noon.

Location: Online via Zoom (a link will be emailed to those who register).

This workshop is open to faculty and research staff at any level. The curriculum is designed to be useful to new and experienced investigators, including seasoned PIs interested in developing program- or center-level proposals.

This will be a two-part workshop for a total of three-and-one-half hours. Registrants are expected to attend both parts A and B, and complete a short (20-30 minute) homework assignment between the sessions.

This is the first workshop in a series that Tufts CTSI will be offering on Team Science. Participants will be able to join any or all at no cost.

Registration

To attend, please register here by September 23, 2020.

Agenda – Part A, September 30

  • 10:00AM: Welcome: Defining Team Science and the Need for a Team-Based Approach
  • 10:15AM: Team Science Competencies and Strategies Overview
  • 10:30AM: Individual Collaboration Readiness
  • 10:45AM: Milestone Brainstorm
  • 11:00AM: Prepare for Part B Grand Challenge Scenario
  • 11:15AM: Wrap-up

Agenda – Part B, October 7

  • 10:00AM: Review and Introduction to Grand Challenge Scenario
  • 10:15AM: Breakout Groups: Shared Visions Statements and Milestones
  • 11:15AM: Report Out
  • 11:25AM: Collaboration Plan Demonstration
  • 11:45AM: Wrap-up

Tufts CTSI Professional Education & Expectations for Course Participants

Tufts CTSI’s Professional Education programs provide non-degree continuing education and training for clinical and translational research professionals from all Tufts CTSI partners and beyond.

Course enrollment priority is given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions. If your participation needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may provide their contact information when you register for the program.

This course is provided free of charge and is supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Award Number UL1TR002544.  The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

Seminars & Workshops
Scientific Manuscript Writing Workshops – Spring 2020

Overview

Ready to transform your research into a manuscript suitable for a peer-reviewed publication?

Find out what editors want and gain confidence in your writing at this Spring’s Scientific Manuscript Writing Workshop.

This three-session workshop will review the process of constructing scientific papers that are logically organized, concisely written, and attentive to reader and reviewer expectations.

You will prepare and present the main sections of a research paper in the IMRAD (introduction, methods, results, and discussion) format, and will receive constructive critiques and written comments. By the end of the sessions, you will have a more polished draft that can stand up to rigorous peer review.

The workshop will be led by Robert J. Goldberg, PhD, a senior researcher who brings with him a wealth of writing and submission expertise from many years as a mentor, journal editor, and medical school writing course director.

Dates and Location

All sessions will take place online via Zoom (a link will be provided to those who register), on Mondays from 2:30pm-3:30PM.

  • Session I (Monday, May 4): Effective Scientific Writing & Review of Examples & Group Review: Introduction
  • Session II (Monday, May 11): Group Review: Data & Figures
  • Session III (Monday, May 18): Group Review: Data & Figures (Version 2)
  • Optional request for one-on-one feedback, but must submit the best version of your manuscript by June 18th for detailed feedback.

Registration and Requirements

Any post-graduate clinical, health services, or public health investigators who have original research intended for publication and peer feedback for writing support are welcome to apply.

Participants are strongly encouraged to attend all three workshop sessions.

Registration for this course is now full. If you would like to be added to the waitlist, please email training@tuftsctsi.org

Registration is on a first come, first served, basis and priority is given to members of Tufts CTSI partner institutions. Once the course is full, additional registrants will be put on a waitlist and invited to the next opportunity. We will confirm your enrollment as soon we finalize the registration list.

Enrolled seats will be prioritized to faculty members who commit to attending and completing all assigned prework. You do not have to have actual study results ready to get the essential work done, but this course will directly benefit those who already have some elements of a work in progress on the introduction, methods, or results section of a paper.

To facilitate effective peer review experiences, we prioritize manuscripts addressing original scientific projects in the areas of clinical and public health research. Class attendance is critical to this peer review-based format. You will be expected to provide thoughtful reviews of attendees drafts and actively engage in classroom discussion. This course is not intended for basic science researchers. Basic science researchers seeking individualized feedback on their manuscript are encouraged to submit a service request at https://informatics.tuftsctsi.org/pims/request.htm.

Details

Learning Objectives

By the end of this workshop series, you will be able to:

  • Discuss the core components of a successful scientific manuscript.
  • Identify strategies and next steps for completing a full manuscript for peer review submission.
  • Anticipate reviewers’ concerns in discussing and presenting your research in writing and how to best respond to any concerns raised.

Workshop Faculty

  • Instructor: Robert J. Goldberg, PhD, Professor, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Department of Population and Quantitative Health Sciences
  • Guest instructor: Nicholas Moustakas, MA, Research Development Specialist, Tufts CTSI

Course Participation

By enrolling in this course, you are agreeing to complete all pre-work assignments, including submitting your draft of the assigned section by the Wednesday prior to peer reviews, and preparing thoughtful comments on colleagues’ drafts for discussion during the session.

Pre-work Deadlines

Submit all drafts to training@tuftsctsi.org by the due dates specified below.

  • Thursday April 29
    • Submit your Introduction section by April 29th (1 or 1 ¼ pages OR three paragraphs; double-spaced)
  • Monday, May 4, Session 1
    • Readings:
      • Welch HG (1999) Preparing manuscripts for submission to medical journals: the paper trail. Eff Clin Pract 2:131–137
      • Example article for critical review: To be emailed ahead of time
      • Example article for critical review: To be emailed ahead of time
    • Review/prepare comments for peers’ introductions
  • Thursday, May 7
    • Submit three – five tables or figures, with a brief description of each
  • Monday, May 11, Session 2
    • Review/prepare comments for peers’ drafts
  • Thursday, May 14
    • Submit updated three – five tables or figures, with a brief description of each
  • Monday, May 18, Session 3
    • Review/prepare comments for peers’ drafts
  • Thursday June 18
    • Final Day to submit Manuscripts for feedback

Tufts CTSI Professional Education & Expectations for Course Participants

Tufts CTSI’s Professional Education programs provide non-degree continuing education and training for clinical and translational research professionals from all Tufts CTSI partners and beyond.

Course enrollment priority is given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions. If your participation needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may provide their contact information when you register for the program.

This course is provided free of charge and is supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Award Number UL1TR002544.  The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

 

Seminars & Workshops
Research Database Creation: Basics and Best Practices 2020

Overview

Are you involved in building a database for your research project?

Building an appropriate database for your study is critical to ensuring successful data collection and analysis. Learn how to build a database in this 90-minute Tufts CTSI workshop, Research Database Creation: Basics & Best Practices. This session will begin with an interactive lecture presented by Rachael Huebner, a Clinical Data Manager at Tufts CTSI, followed by a workshop in which participants will practice building a simple database in Excel.

This workshop is a prerequisite to a subsequent workshop, Research Database Creation: Building a REDCap Database.  Please note, in this workshop, we will not be using REDCap, but we will be learning the fundamentals required for database creation, which will inform our second session where REDCap will be used.

After attending this event, you should be able to:

  • Recognize database creation best practices
  • Identify the clinical and demographic data needed to answer a study question
  • Effectively name and code variables
  • Create an Excel sheet appropriate for study data collection

Details

Date: Thursday, March 12, noon-1:30PM

Location: ONLINE ONLY

This workshop is a prerequisite to a subsequent workshop, Research Database Creation: Building a REDCap Database.

Registration

This workshop is designed for research assistants, clinical research coordinators, investigators, residents, and fellows who will be creating or working with databases for research projects.

To attend, please register here by March 5.

Tufts CTSI Professional Education & Expectation for Course Participants

Tufts CTSI’s Professional Education programs provide non-degree continuing education and training for clinical and translational research professionals from all Tufts CTSI partners and beyond.

Course enrollment priority is given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions. If your participation needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may provide their contact information when you register for the program.

This course is provided free of charge, and was supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of health, Award Number UL1TR002544. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

 

Seminars & Workshops
Research Database Creation: Building a REDCap Database 2020

Overview

Are you involved in building a REDCap database for your research project?

REDCap is an online application that can be used to create research databases. It has many advantages over Excel, and is often the preferred tool for database creation. Learn how to create REDCap databases for your research projects in this 90-minute Tufts CTSI workshop, Research Database Creation: Building a REDCap Database.

This session will consist of a guided tutorial, led by Rachael Huebner, Clinical Data Manager at Tufts CTSI, in which participants will build a simple database in REDCap.

To attend this event, participants must attend the first workshop in this series, Research Database Creation: Basics & Best Practices.

After attending this event, you should be able to:

  • Describe the differences between classic and longitudinal projects, and identify when to use each
  • Create projects, forms, and fields in REDCap
  • Export data from REDCap to Excel

Details

Date: Thursday, March 26, noon-1:30PM

Location: Tufts Center for Medical Education, Room 514 (Computer Lab), 145 Harrison Avenue, Boston

To attend this event, participants must attend the first workshop in this series, Research Database Creation: Basics & Best Practices.

Registration

This workshop is designed for research assistants, clinical research coordinators, investigators, residents, and fellows who will be creating or working with databases for research projects.

Space is limited.

To reserve your seat, please register here by March 19.

Tufts CTSI Professional Education & Expectation for Course Participants

Tufts CTSI’s Professional Education programs provide non-degree continuing education and training for clinical and translational research professionals from all Tufts CTSI partners and beyond.

Course enrollment priority is given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions. If your participation needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may provide their contact information when you register for the program.

This course is provided free of charge, and was supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of health, Award Number UL1TR002544. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

 

Seminars & Workshops
Applying Implementation Science Frameworks to Your Research Plans and Ongoing Studies

Do you have a grant proposal or protocol for an intervention involving hospitals, schools, and local communities?

If you’d like to hone your research aims and strategy to show a clear roadmap for successful translation in real-world settings, join Tufts CTSI on Wednesday, June 24 for a two-part interactive online workshop: Applying Implementation Science Frameworks to Your Research Plans and Ongoing Studies.

Apply by Monday, June 22 for one of 12 seats for researchers working in translational research.

Overview

In this two-part series, all applicants commit to up to two ½ hours of learning time and complete the following:

  • Part 1, Pre-work online course (approx. 1 hour), complete by June 23: Prepared by the workshop instructors, this short course provides an overview of two common implementation frameworks used in grant proposals, RE-AIM (the Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation, and Maintenance Framework) and CFIR (the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research), and how the CFIR framework, combined with ERIC (Expert Recommendations for Implementing Change) strategies, can be used in planning for protocol implementation or problem solving. You will learn what these frameworks are, when to use them, and how to best integrate them into a grant proposal or ongoing study.
  • Part 2, Live online workshop (90 minutes), June 24, 2020, 10:00-11:30AM:  Those who complete the Part 1 assignment will be invited to an interactive live meeting (Zoom) where you will meet with the instructors and colleagues in real time to review the frameworks through case examples and discussions on potential challenges in your proposal or protocol. Participants will be required to ensure audio/video quality of their live online meeting participation and login 10 minutes prior to the session.The workshop agenda may include:
    • Introductions and Overview
    • Review of the Implementation Science Frameworks/Q&A
    • Case Discussions: Examples of Implementation Science Frameworks in a Grant Proposal and Ongoing Study
    • Workshops: Participant Challenges and Cases

Instructors

  • Sara C. Folta, PhD, Director, Integrating Underrepresented Populations in Research, Tufts CTSI; Associate Professor, Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy: Dr. Folta and colleagues implemented, evaluated, and nationally disseminated the StrongWomen – Healthy Hearts program for cardiovascular disease prevention among midlife and older women.
  • Denise Daudelin, RN, MPH, Director, Research Process Improvement, Tufts CTSI; Assistant Professor of Medicine, Tufts University Public Health and Community Medicine: Ms. Daudelin is an Investigator who has worked with hospitals, emergency medical service agencies, primary care practices, and researchers to develop measures of health care quality and achieve improvements in health care delivery and research.

Case Discussions: Examples of Implementation Science Frameworks in a Grant Proposal and Ongoing Study

  • Amy LeClair, PhD, MPhil: Study to evaluate the implementation of patient navigation to reduce disparities for women with breast cancer.
  • Alysse Wurcel, MD, MS: Proposal to develop, implement, and measure the impact of changes to the HIV testing polices at Tufts Medical Center to increase the number of people with substance use disorder who successfully receive HIV testing.

Who should attend

Any research faculty, especially early career faculty, are welcome to apply. Faculty with a draft grant proposal that contains an implementation science framework are strongly encouraged to attend (and may submit a copy of their proposal). Faculty experiencing challenges with an existing protocol are also encouraged to submit a summary of their protocol for feedback.

Registration

Space is limited to 12 participants. Apply here by Monday, June 22.

 

 

This workshop is provided free of charge, and is supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of health, Award Number UL1TR002544. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

Seminars & Workshops
Pfizer Investigator Training Program (iTP) Online

This unique, two-day, virtual (via Zoom), free-of-charge program will empower clinical researchers to build critical skills required for the recruitment, management, conduct, and reporting of clinical trials. It will examine the entire trial process, from planning stages to trial close-out activities, and will provide practical recommendations for increasing the efficiency of clinical trial conduct at investigative sites. This year’s program will also include a pediatric clinical research module.

Led by clinical trial experts, this interactive training will consist of didactic lectures and discussions. The iTP is targeted to investigators and the entire clinical study team, including research fellows, coordinators, research nurses, data managers, regulatory, and IRB members. Clinical trial experience (even if limited) is encouraged, though not required.

Learning modules will include:

  • The Drug Development Process
  • Study Start-Up
  • Conducting a Study
  • Study Oversight
  • Safety in Clinical Trials
  • Pediatric Clinical Research.

Attendees who complete the training will receive a Transcelerate GCP Certificate.

Details

Wednesday, November 4 and Thursday, November 5
2:00-5:00PM
via Zoom (login details will be sent to those who register).

To receive the Transcelerate GCP certificate, attendees are expected to:

  • Attend both sessions for the entire time.
  • Have a stable internet connection.
  • Keep their cameras on for the entire event.
  • Respond to polls and questions.

Registration

Registration for this event is now closed. 

Contact

Questions? Please email info@tuftsctsi.org for assistance.

Seminars & Workshops
Dialogue Facilitation Training

Do you want to be a part of building a culture of communication?

Strong communication skills are important to support the academic and community-based work we do. That is why we are offering a training to teach participants how to facilitate and cultivate productive conversations.

You are cordially invited to a Dialogue Facilitation Training by Jonathan Garlick, DDS, PhD on Wednesday, January 22, 2020, 2:00-5:00PM at Tufts CTSI, 35 Kneeland St. 8th Floor Large Conference Room, Boston.

This interactive event will provide a general level of training to teach you the skills needed to facilitate a structured dialogue and improve communication.

The objectives of this training are to:

  • Promote open and inclusive dialogue
  • Teach participants to recognize how they can be a part of better conversations about potentially divisive issues
  • Encourage active listening and participation in dialogue.

*Complimentary refreshments will be provided.

Once you are trained, we have two upcoming opportunities for you to use your new facilitation skills:

  • Dialogue on Diabetes Research, February 5, 6:00-8:00PM at Roxbury Community College
    Pre-dialogue prep for facilitators: January 29, 4:00-5:00PM at 35 Kneeland St., 8th Floor Large Conference Room, Boston
  • Breaking the Silence Dialogue on Diversity in Research, March 6, 5:15pm-7:45PM on the Tufts Health Sciences Campus, Boston
    Pre-dialogue prep for facilitators: March 2, 4:00-5:00PM at 35 Kneeland St., 8th Floor Large Conference Room, Boston

Details

Dialogue Facilitation Training
Wednesday, January 22, 2:00-5:00PM
35 Kneeland Street, 8th Floor Conference Room, Boston

This event will provide an excellent opportunity for investigators and community members to network across the Tufts CTSI partnership to pursue collaborative translational research interests.

Registration

To attend, please complete our registration form.

 

Seminars & Workshops
Diversity in Research Topic Selection Workshop

Would you like to help to determine the topics and questions to be discussed at an upcoming forum on diversity in research?

Tufts CTSI, Tufts Medical Center, and Tufts University are hosting Breaking the Silence: Diversity in Research on Friday, March 6.

We need your help to develop prompting discussion questions for facilitators to use at this event.

We are looking for people with different values, opinions, and ideas to come together on Thursday, December 12 from noon-1:30PM for a workshop led by Jonathan Garlick, DDS, PhD. The goal of this workshop is to bring together members of the Tufts community to develop questions and topics to foster meaningful discussions that enrich and personalize the topic of diversity in research for all who attend Breaking the Silence.

This Topic Selection Workshop is an opportunity for you to help us jumpstart respectful dialogue, break down stereotypes, inspire curiosity, build empathy, and enable participants to link their health and well-being to their personal and civic responsibilities. To sign up, please register here.

What is Breaking the Silence?

Breaking the Silence is a symposium series developed by Tufts University Associate Provost and Chief Diversity Officer Joyce Sackey, MD. Previous topics include discrimination against Muslims; racism against black lives; and weight bias and health. March 6, 2020 is the fourth Breaking the Silence event, hosted by Tufts Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI), the Institute for Clinical Research and Health Policy Studies (ICRHPS), and Tufts University. This event will include a keynote speaker, a panel discussion, facilitated small-group discussions, and dinner. Details will be available soon.

What is a Topic Selection Workshop?

The Breaking the Silence event will include facilitated discussions to enrich the take-home messages from the keynote speaker and panel discussion. To do this, we must personalize the topic of diversity in research for all participants. The Topic Selection Workshop will bring together diverse voices to discuss, narrow down, and select questions that will be important and interesting to deliberate.

Who is leading the Topic Selection Workshop?

Jonathan Garlick, DDS, PhD, is Tufts CTSI’s Scientific Communications Program Director. He is also a stem cell researcher, a clinician, a professor of dental medicine, and Senior Fellow in Civic Science at Tufts University’s Tisch College of Civic Life. Dr. Garlick’s experience in supporting dialogue across Tufts will guide the question selection process.

The mission of Tufts CTSI’s Scientific Communications Program is to improve the public’s understanding of the purposes and value of clinical research and to build and maintain trust among diverse participants in the face of perceived risk, uncertainty, and conflicting beliefs, values, and interests. Tufts CTSI’s Scientific Communications Program and the Breaking the Science event are intended to foster respectful dialogue on contentious topics, break down stereotypes, inspire curiosity, build empathy, and enable participants to link their health and well-being to their personal and civic responsibilities.

How can I attend the Topic Selection Workshop?

The Diversity in Research Topic Selection Workshop is:

Thursday, December 12, noon-1:30PM
Dental Alumni Lounge
Tufts University School of Dental Medicine
1 Kneeland Street, 15th Floor
Boston

This event is in-person only. Lunch will be provided.

Space is limited! To reserve your seat, please register here by Tuesday, December 10.

 

 

This workshop is provided free of charge, and is supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of health, Award Number UL1TR002544. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

Seminars & Workshops
Research Database Creation: Building a REDCap Database

Overview

Are you involved in building a REDCap database for your research project?

REDCap is an online application that can be used to create research databases. It has many advantages over Excel, and is often the preferred tool for database creation. Learn how to create REDCap databases for your research projects in this 90-minute Tufts CTSI workshop, Research Database Creation: Building a REDCap Database.

This session will begin with a lecture presented by Rachael Huebner, a Clinical Data Manager at Tufts CTSI, followed by a workshop in which participants will practice building a simple database in REDCap.

To attend this event, participants must attend the first workshop in this series, Research Database Creation: Basics & Best Practices.

After attending this event, you should be able to:

  • Describe the differences between classic and longitudinal projects, and identify when to use each
  • Create projects, forms, and fields in REDCap
  • Export data from REDCap to Excel

Details

Date: Tuesday, November 12, 2:00-3:30PM

Location: Tufts Medical Center, IS Training Room, Ziskind Building, 1st Floor, Room 114A

To attend this event, participants must attend the first workshop in this series, Research Database Creation: Basics & Best Practices.

Registration

This workshop is designed for research assistants, clinical research coordinators, investigators, residents, and fellows who will be creating or working with databases for research projects.

Space is limited. To reserve your seat, please register here by October 24.

Tufts CTSI Professional Education & Expectation for Course Participants

Tufts CTSI’s Professional Education programs provide non-degree continuing education and training for clinical and translational research professionals from all Tufts CTSI partners and beyond.

Course enrollment priority is given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions. If your participation needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may provide their contact information when you register for the program.

This course is provided free of charge, and was supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of health, Award Number UL1TR002544. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

 

Seminars & Workshops
Research Database Creation: Basics and Best Practices

Overview

Are you involved in building a database for your research project?

Building an appropriate database for your study is critical to ensuring successful data collection and analysis. Learn how to build a database in this 90-minute Tufts CTSI workshop, Research Database Creation: Basics & Best Practices. This session will begin with an interactive lecture presented by Rachael Huebner, a Clinical Data Manager at Tufts CTSI, followed by a workshop in which participants will practice building a simple database in Excel.

This workshop is a prerequisite to a subsequent workshop, Research Database Creation: Building a REDCap Database.

After attending this event, you should be able to:

  • Recognize database creation best practices
  • Identify the clinical and demographic data needed to answer a study question
  • Effectively name and code variables
  • Create an Excel sheet appropriate for study data collection

Details

Date: Tuesday, October 29, 1:00-2:30PM

Location: Tufts Medical Center, IS Training Room, Ziskind Building, 1st Floor, Room 114A

This workshop is a prerequisite to a subsequent workshop, Research Database Creation: Building a REDCap Database.

Registration

This workshop is designed for research assistants, clinical research coordinators, investigators, residents, and fellows who will be creating or working with databases for research projects.

The workshop is now full. To add your name to the waitlist, please register here.

Tufts CTSI Professional Education & Expectation for Course Participants

Tufts CTSI’s Professional Education programs provide non-degree continuing education and training for clinical and translational research professionals from all Tufts CTSI partners and beyond.

Course enrollment priority is given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions. If your participation needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may provide their contact information when you register for the program.

This course is provided free of charge, and was supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of health, Award Number UL1TR002544. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

 

Seminars & Workshops
Training for New Mentors, Fall 2019

Tufts CTSI offers Mentor Training for individuals who mentor junior faculty in research. These interactive, two-hour sessions are funded by Tufts CTSI.

This session is for faculty members who recently obtained their first funding who are mentoring individuals at the fellow or junior faculty level.

Registration

Admission to the training is by application only. Please apply here by Monday, October 21.

Facilitators

  • Karen Freund, MD, MPH, Professor and Vice Chair of Medicine, Tufts Medical Center; Professor of Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine; Harry and Elsa Jiler Clinical Research Professor, American Cancer Society
  • Jill Maron, MD. MPH, Executive Director, Mother Infant Research Institute; Vice Chair of Pediatric Research, Floating Hospital for Children; Associate Professor, Tufts University School of Medicine

Details

Training for New and Recent Mentors
Thursday, October 31, 3:00-5:00PM
8th Floor, 35 Kneeland Street, Boston

 

Seminars & Workshops
Training for Experienced Mentors, Fall 2019

Tufts CTSI offers Mentor Training for individuals who mentor junior faculty in research. These interactive, two-hour sessions are funded by Tufts CTSI.

This session is for faculty members with more than five years of experience mentoring junior faculty.

Registration

Admission to the training is by application only. Please apply here by Monday, September 16.

Facilitators

  • Gordon Huggins, MD, Director, Molecular Cardiology Research Institute (MCRI) Center for Translational Pharmacology and Genomics, Tufts Medical Center; Associate Professor, Tufts University School of Medicine
  • Sawkat Anwer, DMVH, PhD, Distinguished Professor and Associate Dean for Research, Tufts University Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine; Professor of Biomedical Sciences, Tufts University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences

Details

Training for Experienced Mentors
Tuesday, September 24, 3:00-5:00PM
8th Floor, 35 Kneeland Street, Boston

 

Seminars & Workshops
Scientific Manuscript Writing Workshops 2019

Overview

Ready to transform your research into a manuscript suitable for a peer-reviewed publication?

Find out what editors want and gain confidence in your writing at this fall’s Scientific Manuscript Writing Workshop.

This four-session workshop will review the process of constructing scientific papers that are logically organized, concisely written, and attentive to reader and reviewer expectations.

You will prepare and present the main sections of a research paper in the IMRAD (introduction, methods, results, and discussion) format, and will receive constructive critiques and written comments. By the end of the sessions, you will have a more polished draft that can stand up to rigorous peer review.

The workshop will be led by Robert J. Goldberg, PhD, a senior researcher who brings with him a wealth of writing and submission expertise from many years as a mentor, journal editor, and medical school writing course director.

Dates and Location

All sessions will take place at Tufts CTSI, 35 Kneeland Street, 8th Floor, Boston, on Mondays from 10:15AM-11:45AM.
  • Session I (Monday, October 21): Effective Scientific Writing & Review of Examples
  • Session II (Monday, November 4): Group Review: Introduction
  • Session III (Monday, November 18): Group Review: Methods/Results
  • Session IV (Monday, December 2): Group Review: Discussion
  • Optional one-on-one request for feedback

Registration and Requirements

Any post-graduate clinical, health services, or public health investigators who have original research intended for publication and peer feedback for writing support are welcome to apply.

Participants are required to attend all four workshop sessions.

Register here by Wednesday, October 16. Remote participation may be available.

Registration is on a first come, first served, basis and priority is given to members of Tufts CTSI partner institutions. Once the course is full, additional registrants will be put on a waitlist and invited to the next opportunity. We will confirm your enrollment as soon we finalize the registration list.

Enrolled seats will be prioritized to faculty members who commit to attending and completing all assigned prework. You do not have to have actual study results or references ready to get the essential work done, but this course can benefit those who already have some elements of a work in progress on the introduction, methods, or results section of a paper.

To facilitate effective peer review experiences, we prioritize manuscripts addressing original scientific projects in the areas of clinical and public health research. Class attendance is critical to this peer review-based format. You will be expected to provide thoughtful reviews of attendees drafts and actively engage in classroom discussion. We ask participants to come open-minded and show positive responses to constructive feedback.

This course is not intended for basic science researchers. Basic science researchers seeking individualized feedback on their manuscript are encouraged to submit a service request at https://informatics.tuftsctsi.org/pims/request.htm

Details

Learning Objectives

By the end of this workshop series, you will be able to:
  • Discuss the core components of a successful scientific manuscript
  • Identify strategies and next steps for completing a full manuscript for peer review submission
  • Anticipate reviewers’ concerns in discussing and presenting your research in writing and how to best respond to those concerns

Workshop Faculty

  • Main instructor: Robert J. Goldberg, PhD, Professor, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Department of Quantitative Health Sciences
  • Guest instructor: Nicholas Moustakas, MA, Research Development Specialist, Tufts CTSI

Course Participation

By enrolling in this course, you are agreeing to complete all pre-work assignments, including submitting your draft of the assigned section by the Wednesday prior to peer reviews, and preparing thoughtful comments on colleagues’ drafts for discussion during the session.

Pre-work Deadlines

  • Monday, October 21, Session 1
    • Readings:
      • Welch HG (1999) Preparing manuscripts for submission to medical journals: the paper trail. Eff Clin Pract 2:131–137
      • Example article for critical review: To be emailed ahead of time
      • Example article for critical review: To be emailed ahead of time
  • Wednesday, October 30
    • Submit your Introduction section (1 or 1 ¼ pages OR three paragraphs; double-spaced)
  • Monday, November 4, Session 2
    • Review/prepare comments for peers’ drafts
  • Wednesday, November 13
    • Submit your Methods and Results sections (3-5 pages + up to 3-5 figures, include subheadings; double-spaced)
  • Monday, November 18, Session 3
    • Review/prepare comments for peers’ drafts
  • Wednesday, November 27
    • Submit your Discussion section (3-4 pages, include subheadings; double-spaced)
  • Monday, December 2, Session 4
    • Review/prepare comments for peers’ drafts

Tufts CTSI Professional Education & Expectations for Course Participants

Tufts CTSI’s Professional Education programs provide non-degree continuing education and training for clinical and translational research professionals from all Tufts CTSI partners and beyond.

Course enrollment priority is given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions. If your participation needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may provide their contact information when you register for the program.

This course is provided free of charge and is supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Award Number UL1TR002544.  The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

 

Seminars & Workshops
Scientific Grant Writing Workshops: Page One

Overview

Planning to submit a scientific research grant proposal in early 2020? Need useful feedback on your research objectives?

Tufts CTSI invites 10-15 motivated researchers with developed biomedical, clinical,or translational research project ideas to sign up for Developing Your Page One: a Writing Workshop Series for Researchers. This popular four-session grant writing course is designed to help you develop the critically-important Page One (or Specific Aims) section of your grant proposals through peer review, grantsmanship training, and expert support. You will receive feedback and revise your Page One three times during the program.

By the end of the series, you should be able to:

  • Apply strategies for developing clear and compelling specific aims
  • Practice constructive and effective peer review
  • Explain the importance of aligning your Page One with the funding agency’s mission and priorities, and of adapting it for reviewers’ areas of expertise
  • Describe the NIH-style grant submission process.

The workshops will be facilitated by Susan Lewis, Associate Director of Tufts University’s Office of Research Development (ORD), and Anna Dalby, Research Development Specialist, Tufts ORD.

Details

All sessions are scheduled for 9:30-11:00AM, except the final session. Session 4 is three hours long and begins at 9AM.

  • Session 1 (Thursday, October 10, 2019): Overview of Page One and Funding Agencies
  • Session 2 (Thursday, October 17, 2019): Peer Review, Round 1
  • Session 3 (Thursday, October 24, 2019): Clarity, Concision, and Coherence in Writing
  • Session 4 (Thursday, October 31, 2019; 9AM-noon): Peer Review, Round 2, Next Steps

All sessions will take place at Tufts CTSI, 35 Kneeland Street, 8th Floor, Boston.

Participants must attend all four sessions and must submit a draft of their Page One by September 26, 2019.

Registration

Apply here by September 26, 2019.

The timeline of this program may best serve researchers targeting a proposal submission in early 2020; however, anyone currently writing aims for NIH or a similar grant is welcome to apply.

Priority will be given to faculty from Tufts CTSI partner and collaborator institutions. Once the course is full, additional applicants will be put on a waitlist. We will confirm your enrollment as soon as we finalize the registration list.

Still formulating a research concept? Need some advice? Submit a service request here.

Tufts CTSI Professional Education & Expectation for Course Participants

Tufts CTSI’s Professional Education programs provide non-degree continuing education and training for clinical and translational research professionals from all Tufts CTSI partners and beyond.

Course enrollment priority is given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions. If your participation needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may provide their contact information when you register for the program.

This course is provided free of charge, and was supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of health, Award Number UL1TR002544. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

 

Seminars & Workshops
Health Research at Tufts: Stakeholder Orientation

Overview

Are you curious about how nutrition research is done at Tufts? Interested in finding new ways to participate and contribute throughout the research process?

Join us for an engaging and hands-on event at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging (HNRCA) at Tufts University to help demystify the research process! Learn about how research moves from idea to impact on health. Through group discussion and hands-on experiences of basic science labs, we are opening the doors to some of the Tufts health research facilities to find out how community members can work with researchers to address health research. The workshop will consist of:

  1. An overview ofthe research process
  2. A discussion of how Tufts CTSI is engaging with the community throughout the research process
  3. Visiting labs where clinical research is conducted

Details

Monday, June 3, 2019, 2:00-5:00PM
Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging (HNRCA)
711 Washington Street, Boston MA, 02111
Mezzanine Conference Room

In order to participate fully in the tours, please plan to attend for the entire event from 2:00-5:00PM.

Registration

This event is open to all, including individuals and members of community organizations who are interested in learning more about how health research is conducted, and in meaningful partnerships between the community and academia. Space is limited. Please register here by May 29.

Schedule of Events

Tufts CTSI Professional Education & Expectation for Course Participants

Tufts CTSI’s Professional Education programs provide non-degree continuing education and training for clinical and translational research professionals from all Tufts CTSI partners and beyond.

Course enrollment priority is given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions. If your participation needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may provide their contact information when you register for the program.

This course is provided free of charge, and was supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of health, Award Number UL1TR002544. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

 

Seminars & Workshops
The Odyssey of OHDSI: Using Health Care Data for Research

How can we use health care data to generate reproducible scientific evidence or reliable clinical predictions? What innovative tools are available to allow us to efficiently work with our own data and in collaboration with others?

Join Tufts CTSI on May 6-8 at The Odyssey of OHDSI: Using Health Care Data for Research on the Tufts Health Sciences Campus in Boston to find out!

Observational Health Data Sciences and Informatics (OHDSI, pronounced Odyssey) is a rapidly expanding multi-sector research collaborative dedicated to uncovering the value of health data through large-scale analytics. The OHDSI community includes dozens of academic, corporate, and governmental institutions that use health data for research in the US and around the world. The community conducts methods research to identify best practices and builds state-of-the-art open source tools that implement those methods.

This exciting three-day workshop led by principal developers Marc Suchard, MD, PhD, University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA); Martijn Schuemie, PhD, and Jenna Reps, PhD, Janssen Research and Development, will teach you how to use OHDSI tools on data that conforms to the OHDSI community’s OMOP Common Data Model (CDM). In addition to implementing best practices, these tools are designed to simplify research processes by eliminating data wrangling and standardizing the parts of complex multistep processes that don’t require thoughtful consideration while informing many parts that do.

Day one will briefly cover OHDSI and how it supports research. Most of the day will cover how data are represented by vocabularies in the OMOP CDM and how to use the ATLAS toolset to define cohorts. Day two will give researchers, statisticians, and data analysts a hands-on introduction to using either of the two most mature OHDSI analytic tool sets. These will be taught in two tracks. The first will cover tools for population-level effect estimation. The second will cover tools for developing patient-level prediction models. Day three will guide participants through every step of conducting a study using the methods and tools covered in Day 2. Each session will build incrementally on the last so participants in later sessions will benefit most if they understand material covered in earlier sessions.

This will be a highly practical, hands-on training, perfect for any researcher, statistician, analyst, methodology specialists, or staff who uses health care data for research. Attendees should have basic R experience and understanding of observational data, as well as prior experience analyzing observational data such as electronic health records, before attending this session, and are encouraged to attend all three sessions.

Course Faculty

  • Christian Reich, MD, PhD
    VP Real World Analytics Solutions, IQVIA
  • Jenna Reps, PhD
    Senior Epidemiology Informaticist, Janssen research and Development
  • Martijn Schuemie, PhD
    Director, Epidemiology Analytics, Janssen Research and Development
  • Anthony Sena
    Associate Director of Epidemiology Analytics, Janssen Research and Development
  • Marc Suchard, MD, PhD
    Professor, Department of Biomathematics, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles

Learning Objectives

After completing this workshop series, you should be able to:

  • Relate key OMOP CDM and vocabulary principles to PHDSI’s standardization process
  • Define cohorts, conduct cohort studies, or develop patient-level prediction models using OHDSI tools
  • Identify and access educational and other resources needed to become more fully proficient at using these tools in your research work.

After completing Day 1, you should be able to:

  • Navigate OMOP CDM and vocabularies to define populations and outcomes.
  • Discuss the structure of the OMOP CDM and how the OHDSI community uses it to support observational research.

After completing Day 2, you should be able to:

  • Track 1:
    • Demonstrate how OHDSI tools can be utilized to design and implement a comparative cohort study in observational healthcare data
  • Track 2:
    • Describe the patient-level prediction model process
    • Develop models using the OHDSI Patient-Level Prediction framework
    • Identify key elements to develop and validate prediction models using the OHDSI tools.

After completing Day 3, you should be able to:

  • Discuss basic study design and statistical concepts and procedures

Details

Monday, May 6, 2019, 10:00AM-5:00PM

OMOP-CDM, Vocabulary, Cohort Definitions
Tufts University School of Dental Medicine, Rachel’s Auditorium, 14th Floor
1 Kneeland Street, Boston

Tuesday, May 7, 2019, 9:00AM-5:00PM

Track 1: Population-level Effect Estimation (Cohort Method)
Tufts University School of Dental Medicine, Dental Board Room 1533, 15th Floor
1 Kneeland Street, Boston

Track 2: Patient-level Prediction
Tufts University School of Dental Medicine, Rachel’s Auditorium, 14th Floor
1 Kneeland Street, Boston

Wednesday, May 8, 2019, 9:00AM-5:00PM

OHDSI Tools and Hands-On Your Data
Tufts Center for Medical Education, Room 216A, 2nd Floor
145 Harrison Avenue, Boston

Registration

This workshop is intended for people who want to learn how health data are represented using OHDSI’s data standards and those who want to use OHDSI tools to define research cohorts, conduct cohort studies, or develop patient-level prediction models using OHDSI tools. The series is perfect for any researcher, statistician, analyst, methodology specialists, or staff who uses health care data for research.

Each session will incrementally build on the skills gained in the previous session(s). Though not a prerequisite, participants who have attended or already understand the material covered in previous sessions will gain the most from subsequent sessions.

To reserve your space, please register here by April 29.

 

Tufts CTSI Professional Education & Expectation for Course Participants

Tufts CTSI’s Professional Education programs provide non-degree continuing education and training for clinical and translational research professionals from all Tufts CTSI partners and beyond.

Course enrollment priority is given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions. If your participation needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may provide their contact information when you register for the program.

This course is provided free of charge, and was supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of health, Award Number UL1TR002544. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

Seminars & Workshops
Advancing Good Patient Recruitment Practice in Clinical Trials, featuring Industry Experts from BBK Worldwide

We know you know.

Study after study shows that recruiting and retaining study participants is one of the weakest links in clinical research.

Energize yourself with this interactive 60-minute seminar and learn how to adopt a patient-centric mindset for clinical research. Understanding the principles and standards that guide the recruitment, enrollment, and retention of patients in clinical trials is critical to success. As long as research teams focus on what specific tactics will break through the wall of difficult recruitment, this problem will persist. For 95% of studies, solving this enrollment problem is well within reach once we focus on the why instead of the what.

Join our guest presenters from BBK Worldwide, Bonnie A. Brescia, Founding Principal and Corporate Development Officer, and Aaron Fleishman, Director of Market Development, for the first of three sessions that focus on how patient experience drives successful patient recruitment, engagement, and retention.

Participation in every session in the series is not necessary; attendees will gain insights and techniques to advance their thinking, build skills, and improve performance in patient recruitment in each session. Subsequent events will drill down into the key concepts presented in this initial event.

For 35 years BBK Worldwide, The Patient Experience Company, has been at the forefront of the patient recruitment industry. Backed by efficacy data and market research, BBK is redefining what it means to be patient-centric within the clinical research industry by educating consumers, engaging participants, and unburdening sites. To learn more about BBK Worldwide visit www.bbkworldwide.com.

Learning Objectives

After attending this event, participants should be able to do the following on their own:

  • Apply six key principles of patient recruitment to any clinical study
  • Analyze a protocol from a recruitment perspective
  • Consider metrics and mechanisms for reporting on recruitment, engagement, and retention
  • Assess recruitment plans as “living documents”

Details

Wednesday, April 24, 2019, 3:00-4:00PM
Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Room 114, 145 Harrison Avenue, Boston MA

During this 60-minute session, BBK will combine a formal presentation with group exercises, and Q&A time. Upon registration, participants will receive a mock protocol synopsis for a quick review prior to the session. This protocol will be used during the exercise portion of the session.

Registration

This seminar is ideal for professionals involved in all aspects of clinical research (whether academic-, industry-, or government-sponsored) and regardless of therapeutic area, large or small molecules, devices or diagnostics, rare or common conditions.

Tufts CTSI and Tufts network partner organizations:

  • Program management and research teams
  • Principal investigators
  • Study coordinators
  • Medicine and life sciences students
  • IRB administrators

Intermediate Level: appropriate for individuals who already have a basic understanding of why and how clinical trials are conducted.

To reserve your space, please register here.

 

Tufts CTSI Professional Education & Expectation for Course Participants

Tufts CTSI’s Professional Education programs provide non-degree continuing education and training for clinical and translational research professionals from all Tufts CTSI partners and beyond.

Course enrollment priority is given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions. If your participation needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may provide their contact information when you register for the program.

This course is provided free of charge, and was supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of health, Award Number UL1TR002544. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

Seminars & Workshops
Brown Bag Lunch: Developing Recruitment and Retention Plans

Need guidance on developing your recruitment and retention plan?

Join us for an hour-long workshop, Developing Recruitment and Retention Plans. This session will take place during lunch hour, so please feel free to bring your lunch.

Recruitment and retention are critical to the success of a research study; however, generating a plan that considers cost, target audience, best practices, and retention of participants can be challenging during the study development phase of research. This workshop, led by Sara Folta, PhD, Director of Integrating Underrepresented Populations in Research and C. Phillip Oettgen, Project Manager of the Recruitment and Retention Support Unit (RRSU) seeks to raise awareness about the key elements and major considerations of a recruitment and retention plan.

After attending this event, participants should be able to do the following on their own:

  • Describe how to set realistic recruitment goals for research studies
  • Explain how to identify and best reach different target audiences, including underrepresented populations
  • Recognize realistic expectations and knowledge of resources
  • Discuss challenges to retention and key strategies to improve it.

Details

Thursday, March 14, noon-1:00PM
Tufts CTSI, 35 Kneeland Street, 8th Floor Conference Room
Boston MA

Registration

This program is open to research coordinators and investigators in clinical and non-clinical fields. Any research team members interested in recruitment and retention are welcome.

To attend, please register here.

Tufts CTSI Professional Education & Expectation for Course Participants

Tufts CTSI’s Professional Education programs provide non-degree continuing education and training for clinical and translational research professionals from all Tufts CTSI partners and beyond.

Course enrollment priority is given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions. If your participation needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may provide their contact information when you register for the program.

This course is provided free of charge, and was supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of health, Award Number UL1TR002544. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

Seminars & Workshops
Plain Language for Health 2019

Plain Language for Health: Writing and Design for Health Research and Practice is for motivated individuals and teams working to communicate health information in ways people can understand.

The two-day workshop on Thursday, March 28 and Friday, March 29, 9:00AM-4:00PM, features training with health literacy and plain language experts from Tufts University School of Medicine and the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, and an evening networking reception sponsored by CommunicateHealth.

Speakers from Tufts Clinical and Translational Science Institute at Tufts Medical Center (CTSI) and Multi-Regional Clinical Trials Center of Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard (MRCT) will lead interactive discussions on how to apply principles of health literacy and plain language to health research and informed consent. The workshop will teach actionable skills and techniques to improve community engagement, build transparency and trust, and connect with patients, research participants, and the community.

Presenting Sponsors

  • Tufts CTSI, accelerating the translation of research into clinical use, medical practice, and impact on health
  • Public Health and Community  Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine (TUSM), preparing health professionals to eliminate health inequities, reduce the burden of disease and injury, promote mental and physical health, and prevent global threats to the environment

Contributing Sponsors

  • Multi-Regional Clinical Trials Center (MRCT), engages diverse stakeholders to define emerging issues in global clinical trials and creates ethical and actionable solutions
  • CommunicateHealth, award-winning communications firm specializing in health behavior change
  • Tufts Health Literacy Leadership Institute (HLLI), internationally known for health literacy professional development and leadership to eliminate health disparities and improve population health

 

Seminars & Workshops
Advancing Confidence and Connection in Public Speaking

Need help finding your voice and engaging your audience? Want to improve your communication skills to convey complex information to others?

Join Tufts CTSI for an exciting two-part workshop, Advancing Confidence and Connection in Public Speaking. In two 90-minute interactive sessions, Bridget Kathleen O’Leary, MFA, Visiting Artist in Directing at Tufts University School of Arts and Sciences, will lead guide attendees through the process of finding confidence in their own voices.

Part One of the workshop will teach you how to pitch your research to audiences large and small through increased confidence and audience engagement techniques.

Part Two will help you to deliver dry information in a clear and engaging way, creating a narrative flow and conversation with an audience.

After attending Parts One and Two of this workshop, participants should be able to:

  • Recognize how voice and speech impact efficient communication
  • Practice elements of relaxation, resonance, and expressiveness during public speaking
  • Recall techniques to command the attention of, and engagement, with their audience
  • Identify techniques to communicate ideas and objectives with clarity and authenticity

Participants are expected to attend both 90-minute sessions and should bring to Part Two a 2-3 minute sample piece (lecture, presentation, pitch, or persuasive argument).

Details

Part One: Tuesday, March 12, 3:30-5:00PM, 8th Floor Large Conference Room, 35 Kneeland Street, Boston MA

Part Two: Friday, March 15, 2:30-4:00PM, 8th Floor Large Conference Room, 35 Kneeland Street, Boston MA

Registration

Please register here.

Tufts CTSI Professional Education & Expectation for Course Participants

Tufts CTSI’s Professional Education programs provide non-degree continuing education and training for clinical and translational research professionals from all Tufts CTSI partners and beyond.

Course enrollment priority is given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions. If your participation needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may provide their contact information when you register for the program.

This course is provided free of charge, and was supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of health, Award Number UL1TR002544. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

Seminars & Workshops
Museum of Science-Tufts CTSI Forum Collaboration: Topic Selection Workshop

Would you like to help to determine the topics and questions to be discussed at upcoming Museum of Science/Tufts CTSI public forums on health research?

Tufts CTSI and Museum of Science, Boston are planning four public forums on important topics in health research. At each forum, we will invite the public to engage in interactive and facilitated discussions as they work together to make decisions or solve a problem.

We need your help to choose a topic for deliberation at the first forum, to be held at the Museum of Science in fall 2019.

We are looking for people with different values, opinions, and ideas to come together at an all-day Topic Selection Workshop on Friday, March 1 to select a forum topic that will help inform local researchers about the needs, concerns, and ideas of the community.

Workshop participants will hear lightning talks from community members and experts in the fields of addiction, precision medicine, and exercise/nutrition research and form small groups to discuss, narrow down, and select questions that will be important and interesting for the public to deliberate. By involving community partners and other stakeholders in the beginning of the process, we hope to leave this workshop with the topic of the fall 2019 forum and a plan to move forward to further engage the local community in science and research.

Speakers will include:

Details

Friday, March 1, 8:30AM-5:00PM (breakfast and lunch will be provided)
Tufts Center for Medical Education, Room 114 East
145 Harrison Avenue, Boston MA

Registration

Registration is required. Please register here by February 25.

Tufts CTSI Professional Education & Expectation for Course Participants

Tufts CTSI’s Professional Education programs provide non-degree continuing education and training for clinical and translational research professionals from all Tufts CTSI partners and beyond.

Course enrollment priority is given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions. If your participation needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may provide their contact information when you register for the program.

This course is provided free of charge, and was supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of health, Award Number UL1TR002544. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

Seminars & Workshops
Pfizer Oncology Drug Discovery and Development Workshop

Are you new to drug development research? Interested in learning more about obtaining FDA approval of an investigational drug product?

In this one-day drug development workshop, two groups will ‘role-play’ multidisciplinary drug development teams attempting to bring a new chemical entity from the idea stage all the way to review by the FDA. Each participant will be assigned a specific role on a typical oncology study team (i.e., project manager, discovery/pharmaceutical scientist, drug safety, regulatory, or market assessment specialist) and will serve as the expert in a particular component of the process.

The 3-D Oncology simulation relies on a computer program to generate ‘results’ from the scientific experiments and clinical studies that the team will conduct. For this program, Pfizer Oncology will have several medical facilitators available to participate.

This will be a great professional development opportunity for those new to drug development research or looking to learn more. Please note this program is not CME accredited.

Some key take home messages from the program include:

  • The oncology drug development process is complicated and time consuming.
  • The oncology drug development process is costly.
  • Drug development is competitive.
  • Drug development requires teamwork.
  • Drug development does not always produce viable products.
  • Managing both the science and regulatory environment is critical in the drug development process.

Details

Wednesday, March 20, 2019, 9:00AM-3:30PM
Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, 145 Harrison Avenue, Boston MA

Registration

Admission to the workshop is by application only. To apply, please register here by March 6, 2019.

We are recruiting 16-18 early career investigators, clinical and/or research fellows, and other research staff. Admission to the workshop is by application only and priority will be given to researchers and clinical fellows from Tufts CTSI partner institutions. A background in oncology research is preferred though not required. All must commit to being an active participant in the full session. Once registration is full, you may be placed on a waitlist.

Attendance and active participation in the full workshop (9AM–3:30PM) is critical to this group-based workshop format. You will be expected to actively engage with your assigned role, participate in group discussion, and respectfully work as an active member of your oncology study team.

Tufts CTSI Professional Education & Expectation for Course Participants

Tufts CTSI’s Professional Education programs provide non-degree continuing education and training for clinical and translational research professionals from all Tufts CTSI partners and beyond.

Course enrollment priority is given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions. If your participation needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may provide their contact information when you register for the program.

This course is provided free of charge, and was supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of health, Award Number UL1TR002544. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

Seminars & Workshops
To Resubmit or Not: Considerations and Next Steps When Your Proposal Isn’t Funded

Did you miss the payline for funding your NIH Proposal? Need help interpreting reviews and deciding when is best to revise and resubmit?

Join Tufts CTSI and the Tufts University Office of Research Development, part of the Office of the Vice Provost for Research, for this valuable one-hour seminar and panel discussion focusing on best practices for surviving peer review and successfully resubmitting an NIH proposal. Seasoned PIs will review reasoning and rationale behind changes they have made in response to study section review. Drawing on insights they have gained as applicants, reviewers, and mentors, they will delve into approaches to evaluating Summary Statements, tailoring responses, and rethinking aims. With expertise spanning the basic-to-clinical research spectrum, panelists will bring a wide range of perspectives on using critiques to improve a study whether in the lab or in the clinic. Topics will include:

  • Interpreting reviewer comments
  • Deciding whether to resubmit
  • Understanding what needs to be changed
  • Framing the Introduction and responding to specific criticisms
  • Avoiding common problems in resubmissions
  • Finding resources or collaborators to strengthen the research plan

Panelists will include:

  • Marta Gaglia, PhD, Assistant Professor of Molecular Biology & Microbiology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences
  • Caroline Genco, PhD, Arthur E Spiller Professor & Chair of Immunology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences
  • Cheryl London, DVM, PhD, Anne Engen and Dusty Professor in Comparative Oncology, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine

Details

January 24, 2019, 2:00–3:00 PM
35 Kneeland Street, Boston MA
8th Floor Large Conference Room

Registration

This program is open to all early career investigators, clinical and/or research fellows, and seasoned PIs from Tufts CTSI partner institutions. Any researcher considering their options for a recent unfunded proposal to NIH or similar funding agencies is welcome to attend.

Please register here by January 18, 2019.

Learning Objectives

After attending this session, participants should be able to:

  • Interpret common reviewer comments
  • Identify key factors to assess when considering a resubmission
  • Recognize items reviewers may look for in resubmitted proposals
  • Identify Tufts University and Tufts CTSI resources to help strengthen your application

Tufts CTSI Professional Education & Expectation for Course Participants

Tufts CTSI’s Professional Education programs provide non-degree continuing education and training for clinical and translational research professionals from all Tufts CTSI partners and beyond.

Course enrollment priority is given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions. If your participation needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may provide their contact information when you register for the program.

This course is provided free of charge, and was supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of health, Award Number UL1TR002544. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

Seminars & Workshops
Cardiac Cachexia Across Species

How can veterinarians and physicians collaborate to solve health problems?

Learn about a practical example of One Health, a multi-disciplinary approach to address a common and serious health condition, at Tufts Medical Center’s Medical Ground Rounds on October 5.

Lisa Freeman, DVM, PhD, DACVN, Director of Tufts CTSI One Health Program and Amanda Vest, MBBS, MPH, Medical Director, Cardiac Transplantation Program, will discuss their research collaboration for improved diagnosis and treatment of cardiac cachexia, a complex wasting condition recognized in as many as 20-50% of humans with systolic heart failure and in similar numbers of pet dogs with spontaneously-occurring heart failure.

This one-hour seminar will present current challenges in the clinic and research, and novel opportunities to identify cardiac cachexia earlier and to treat it more effectively through One Health methods.

After the seminar, participants will be able to:

  • Recognize similarities and differences in cardiac cachexia across species.
  • Describe the mechanisms underlying cardiac cachexia.
  • List methods for diagnosing cardiac cachexia.
  • Discuss the potential benefits of cross-species research in developing strategies for treating cardiac cachexia.

Details

Friday, October 5, 2018, 12:00-1:00PM
Wolff Auditorium, Tufts Medical Center, 800 Washington Street, Boston

You are welcome to bring your own lunch.

This Grand Rounds is designed by Tufts CTSI, an NIH-funded research services organization for the Tufts community and beyond.

Registration

Registration is not required.

Seminars & Workshops
Researcher Book Club

Overview

Want to make time for leadership training and discussion?

This fall, join Tufts CTSI’s inaugural researcher book club to foster your leadership skills.

Paul Beninger, MD, MBA, Assistant Professor of Public Health and Community Medicine and Director of the MD/MBA & MBS/MBA Program at Tufts University School of Medicine, will provide coaching over four book club lunches. The book club will encourage social reading, interactive exercises, and discussion on practical challenges you and your peers face. You will gain practical insights to manage your career and lay early foundations for critical soft skills expected for today’s leaders in team-based science.

Learning Objectives

After completing this book club program, you will have insights into:

  • Discovering your strengths and challenges as observed by yourself and others
  • Examining the triad of soft skills required in working relationships: teamwork and collaboration, negotiation and conflict resolution, and management and leadership.
  • Reframing management and leadership as a broad spectrum of skills to reflect upon and practice daily in the workplace

Dates and Location

Dates: Four 90-minute sessions on Tuesdays in fall 2018

Location: Tufts University’s Boston Health Sciences Campus

  • Session I, October 16, 2018, 12:00-1:30pm: Circle One – Self
  • Session II, October 30, 2018 12:00-1:30pm Circle Two – Other
  • Session III, November 20, 12:00-1:30pm Circle Three – Institutions & Job Knowledge
  • Session IV, December 11, 12:00-1:30pm Circle Four – Management and Leadership

Registration and Requirements

  • Registration Deadline: Register here by Monday, October 8, 2018
    Registration is first come, first served, and priority is given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions. Once the course is full, additional registrants will be put on a waitlist and invited to the next opportunity. We will confirm your enrollment as soon we finalize the registration list.
  • Target Audience: We are recruiting 12-15 early career clinical, biomedical, or public health researchers, including assistant-level professors, post-graduate scientists such as post-doctoral scholars, research fellows, clinical fellows or senior residents conducting or pursuing research. Priority will be given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions. All must commit to attending every session and completing assignments.
  • Assignments:
    • Readings:
    • Private Reflection Journal: You will be encouraged to start keeping a private journal and are invited to share your learnings with others in the the class throughout the course. Book chapters are in a workbook format and include guiding questions and practical toolbox skills and exercises that you may choose to use or reflect upon.

Expected Time Commitment

Class attendance is critical to this peer-led discussion format. You will be expected to actively engage in classroom discussion, be open-minded, and respectfully respond to any constructive feedback. If your participation needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may provide their contact information when you register for the book club.

About Paul Beninger, MD, MBA

Dr. Beninger is Assistant Professor of Public Health & Community Medicine at Tufts University School of Medicine, where he is the Director of the MD/MBA and MBS/MBA Programs. He has more than three decades of career experience as a regulator and member of the Senior Executive Service in the US Food and Drug Administration, as a manager and executive in the pharmaceutical industry, including pharmacovigilance, and as a member of the academic community.

Dr. Beninger began his career in drug development in 1987 at the US Food and Drug Administration, first as a reviewer and manager for drugs against HIV/AIDS and opportunistic infections and then as a division director for medical devices. He joined Merck & Company in 1995 and developed experience in regulatory affairs, medical affairs and drug safety in the areas of anti-infective drug and biological products, vaccines, anti-diabetic drug products and oncology drug products, before joining Genzyme as vice-president of pharmacovigilance in 2006; Genzyme was acquired by Sanofi in 2011. Dr. Beninger retired from Genzyme-Sanofi in April 2017.

Dr. Beninger trained in internal medicine and infectious diseases. He received his MD from the University of California, Davis, his BA from Claremont McKenna College in Claremont, California, his MBA from St Joseph’s University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and his graduate certificate in epidemiology from Tufts.

Dr Beninger has published and spoken extensively on regulatory science, drug and vaccine safety, and pharmacovigilance. He is a topics editor (pharmacovigilance and pharmacoepidemiology) for Clinical Therapeutics, and a fellow of the American College of Physicians and the Infectious Disease Society of America.

Seminars & Workshops
Scientific Manuscript Writing Workshops

Overview

Need to transform your ideas into a publishable manuscript? Finding it difficult to write alone?

 

Before the new academic year gets underway, spend just four lunch meetings with your colleagues to write the core sections of your manuscript. Commit to attending four 75-minute working lunches to work on your draft.

 

Optional service requests are available for one-on-one consultations on general English writing or basic science-specific writing styles.

 

Dates and Location (Late Summer and Early Fall)

Boston Health Sciences Campus, location TBD
  • Session I: Friday, July 6, 12:00–1:15PM
  • Session II: Friday, July 13, 12:00–1:15PM
  • Session III: Monday, September 17, 11:30AM-12:45PM*
  • Session IV: Monday, September 24, 11:30AM-12:45PM*

*September dates are subject to change.

Registration and Requirements

Twelve seats are available, and priority is given to faculty members who commit to attending and submitting their manuscript drafts prior to all four sessions. You do not have to have study results, findings, abstract, or references ready to get the essential work done, but it would be beneficial for you to have some elements of a work in progress such as the introduction, methods, or results section of a paper.

 

 

First assignment due by Monday, July 2, 2018.
  • Reading
    • Welch HG (1999) Preparing manuscripts for submission to medical journals: the paper trail. Eff Clin Pract 2:131–137
  • Submit the first draft in Microsoft Word to Sarah Jette. Minimum requirements:
    • One or two paragraphs for Introduction
    • Two to four paragraphs for Methods
    • Three to five tables or figures or data graphs that illustrate your data, even if you don’t have findings to date
  • Subsequent drafts and peer review are due two business days prior to each session.

 

Details

Tufts CTSI is excited to recruit up to 12 motivated biomedical and clinical faculty members to join an inaugural workshop series designed to get you started on efficient manuscript writing. Don’t miss this chance to get face time with Robert J. Goldberg, PhD and his advice on the elements of successful manuscripts such as navigating major journals, dealing with sample sizes, scientific writing style, and approaches to sentence composition.

 

The program is focused solely on hands-on writing exercises and peer review with expert coaching. The participants will incorporate class feedback and submit a new draft each session with a goal of polishing each section of their scientific manuscript in the IMRAD (Introduction, Methods, Results, and Discussion) format.

 

By the end of the series, you may have outlined subheadings of the Methods, Results (if applicable), and Discussion sections, and begun identifying the strengths and limitations of your study.

Workshop Faculty

  • Main instructor: Robert J. Goldberg, PhD, Professor, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Department of Quantitative Health Sciences
  • Guest instructor: Nicholas Moustakas, MA, Research Development Specialist, Tufts CTSI

Learning Objectives

By the end of this workshop series, you will be able to:
  • Discuss the core components of a successful scientific manuscript
  • Identify strategies and next steps for completing a full manuscript for peer review submission
  • Anticipate reviewers concerns in discussing and presenting your research in writing and how to best respond to those concerns

Expectation for Homework and Your Commitment

Registration is first come, first served, and priority is given to members of Tufts CTSI partner institutions. Once the course is full, additional registrants will be put on a waitlist and invited to the next opportunity. We will confirm your enrollment as soon we finalize the registration list.

 

Class attendance is critical to this peer review-based format. If your participation in these workshops needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may optionally provide the contact information when you register for the workshop program. You will be expected to provide thoughtful reviews of teammate drafts and actively engage in classroom discussion. We ask participants to come open-minded and show positive responses to constructive feedback.

 

Seminars & Workshops
Write a Winning NIH Aims Page & Narrative

Tufts CTSI is sponsoring a group viewing of a live webinar, Specific Aims & Narrative Sections: Grab NIH Reviewers’ Attention, Get Your Grant Funded, on Thursday, February 15, 1:00-2:30PM.

Presented by Principal Investigator (PI) Leader (formally known as PI Association), this 90-minute in-depth lecture will be available for viewing to researchers who join us in-person at the Tufts Boston Health Sciences Campus.

The webinar will include a lecture by Christopher Dant, PhD, an NIH-trained grant writer and former journal editor at JAMA. He worked as a senior writer and managed publications at Stanford’s Medical School and established and built the Clinical Publications Division at Genentech in California. Until recently, Dr. Dant served on the faculty at Dartmouth Medical School and Norris Cotton Cancer Center to deliver lectures on NIH grant writing and manuscript writing.

Details

Thursday, February 15, 2018, 1:00-2:30PM
Tufts CTSI
35 Kneeland Street, 8th Floor
Boston, MA

Registration

Space is limited. To attend, please register here by Friday, February 9.

 

Seminars & Workshops
A Team-based Approach to Data and Safety Monitoring Boards

What is a Data Safety and Monitoring Board (DSMB), and how can it improve your study?

IRBs and funding agencies often require DSMBs for intervention studies. Find out what DSMBs do and how best to collaborate with them at a two-hour Tufts CTSI seminar, A Team-based Approach to Data and Safety Monitoring Boards (DSMBs). Led by clinical study experts, this interactive training will consist of didactic lectures, discussions, and group activities for investigators and their clinical study teams, including research fellows, coordinators, research nurses, data managers, biostatisticians, regulatory personnel, and IRB members.

Instructors/Facilitators

  • Tamsin Knox, MD, MPH, Associate Professor, Tufts University School of Medicine; Associate Director, Tufts CTSI, Regulatory Affairs and Clinical and Translational Research Center (CTRC)
  • Farzad Noubary, PhD, Assistant Professor, Tufts University School of Medicine, Biostatistician, Tufts CTSI, BERD Center
  • Julie SantaCroce Burt, Clinical Research Coordinator, Tufts Medical Center

Training Outline

  • Introduction & Overview of DSMBs
  • Primacy of Data for Effective DSMB Review: Planning, Managing, and Reporting
  • Dealing with Different Types of Safety Events
  • Working with Biostatisticians
  • Break
  • Group Activity/Table Exercises

Learning Objectives

By the end of this seminar, you will be able to:

  • Describe roles and responsibilities in working with a DSMB
  • Locate DSMBs’ extended scientific expertise and support in the context of a disease, population, or intervention
  • Recognize the importance of engaging a DSMB in an early stage of your study design
  • Recognize DSMBs’ comprehensive approaches to safety monitoring as valuable steps for patient safety

Details

Tuesday, March 27, 9:00-11:00AM
Tufts Center for Medical Education, Room 221
145 Harrison Avenue
Boston, MA

Registration

Please register here to attend.

 

Seminars & Workshops
Pediatric Clinical Trials Workshop

Seminar Info

Need a larger sample size for your clinical trial? Interested in increasing research participation from children with diverse backgrounds? Join Tufts CTSI and Children’s National CTSA on Wednesday, April 18, 2018, 8:00AM-5:00PM in Washington DC, Marriott Wardman Park, at an inaugural workshop, Challenges & Opportunities in Pediatric Clinical Trials, designed for pediatric investigators and their teams.

This free, one-day, immersive case-based workshop is the first CTSA hub-sponsored forum for all levels of investigators to reflect on the core competencies expected for today’s pediatric clinical studies. It will take place the day before the Association for Clinical and Translational Science’s Translational Science 2018.

Details

Wednesday, April 18, 8:00AM-5:00PM
Washington Marriott Wardman Park, Washington, DC, Madison Room
(*prior to ACTS Annual Meeting 4/19/18–4/21/18)

Seminars & Workshops
Issues of Trust in Research Participation

Seminar Info

Are you a researcher experiencing difficulties with recruiting research participants? Are you a physician, nurse, or staff member who refers patients to clinical trials?

Trust is a major barrier to patients considering enrollment in research trials. Explore the causes and results of mistrust and learn why “trust me” is not enough at Issues of Trust in Research Participation, a Tufts Medical Center Grand Rounds event. This hour-long seminar will be led by Robert Sege, MD, PhD, Co-Director of Tufts CTSI’s Stakeholder and Community Engagement Program, Chief Medical Officer & Director of The Medical Foundation at Health Resources in Action (HRiA), and Adjunct Professor of Medicine and Pediatrics at Tufts University School of Medicine. Dr. Sege will present a history of unethical studies conducted with vulnerable populations, and will discuss more recent controversies surrounding placebo-controlled trials at the beginning of the AIDS epidemic. Following his presentation, there will be a panel discussion on patient advocacy and community perspectives.

After attending this session, you should be able to:

  • Describe current and historical reasons for mistrust of medical research.
  • Recognize the need to examine issues of trust in the design and communication of clinical studies.
  • Understand patients who hesitate to enroll in clinical studies and trials.
  • Utilize Tufts CTSI expertise to better communicate with participants and research teams.

Details

Friday, February 2, noon-1:00PM
Wolff Auditorium, Tufts Medical Center
800 Washington Street, Boston

You are welcome to bring your own lunch.

 

Seminars & Workshops
Expert Feedback on Changing Policies for NIH-Funded Studies

Seminar Materials

Seminar video (mp4)

Seminar slides (PowerPoint)

NIH Clinical Trial Requirements

Annotated Form E (PDF)

Seminar Info

Are you an NIH grant applicant, awardee, researcher or research administrator?
Feeling unprepared to grasp all regulatory changes scheduled to take effect in 2018?

Join us on December 5 at a seminar entitled Expert Feedback on Changing Policies for NIH-funded Studies. You will gain in-depth insights into recently announced requirements for NIH clinical trials grants and how the changes will affect you. Anyone planning to apply for an NIH grant early next year is strongly encouraged to attend.

This two-hour interactive seminar will feature joint presentations from regulatory experts representing the Tufts Health Sciences Institutional Review Board (IRB) and the Tufts University and Tufts Medical Center research administration offices. The expert panel will highlight the following topics, and current Tufts IRB-specific responses to the changes and recommendations for addressing potential roadblocks. Each topic will include a short presentation, followed by panel responses and audience Q&A.

Have questions? Please submit your inquiries when you register or email us at training@tuftsctsi.org. We will try to address all questions during the session!

Seminar Topics

  • Introduction & Review of New Requirements
  • NIH Policy Definition of Clinical Trials
  • Good Clinical Practice (GCP) Training
  • Single IRB: What Investigators Need to Know
  • ClinicalTrials.Gov
  • Other Changes to Note, Discussion, and Closing Remarks

Speaker Panel

  • Andreas Klein, MD, Director, Regulatory Affairs, Tufts CTSI; Tufts Medical Center; Chair, Tufts Health Sciences Institutional Review Board
  • Kathleen Benoit, Senior Research Administrator, Tufts University, Office of the Vice Provost for Research (OVPR)
  • Frederick M. Frankhauser, JD, MBA, RPh, Director, Grants & Contracts, Tufts Medical Center
  • Marcia Izzi, MPH, Business Finance Manager, Tufts CTSI
  • Meghan Coughlin, MS, Research Administrator, Office of Research Administration, Tufts Medical Center

After attending this session, you should be able to:

  • Identify tools and resources for determining if your study is a clinical trial and what actions are required for an NIH grant proposal, IRB applications, and study reporting
  • Outline financial and administrative prerequisites needed to collaborate with other institutions under the single IRB requirement
  • Describe the importance of engaging Tufts IRB in the early stage of proposal development

Details

Tuesday, December 5, 2017, 1:00-3:00PM
Jaharis Family Center for Biomedical Education and Nutrition Sciences, Behrakis Auditorium
150 Harrison Avenue, Boston MA 02111
Or via live, interactive webcast (a link will be provided to those who register).

Registration

Please click here to register to attend.

 

This seminar is sponsored by Tufts CTSI.

 

Seminars & Workshops
Managing Yourself Before Managing Others

Is your team working together effectively?

The success of all organizations depends upon how well members work. As research becomes more interdisciplinary, skills that promote collaboration are at a premium; but few of us have the time or opportunity to develop the skills necessary for successful teamwork, such as:

  • Delegation
  • Collaboration
  • Speaking clearly/succinctly
  • Engaging in conflict constructively
  • Listening
  • Prioritizing work
  • Creating focus
  • Building relationships

Take a break from your busy schedule to reflect on your own challenges with respect to working on a team. Give yourself the time to improve your non-technical skills and gain actionable information for making real change. Join Tufts CTSI for Managing Yourself Before Managing Others, a half-day workshop that will provide you with a self-assessment tool and peer feedback on an adaptive skill you hope to acquire or further develop.

Led by Cheryl D. Vaughan, PhD, EdM, Managing Director of Boston Biomedical Innovation Center (B-BIC) Skills Development Center, this workshop is customized to support the development of team science skills at Tufts CTSI and its partners. It was offered previousl¬y at the Science of Team Science (SciTS) Conference.

By the end of this workshop, you will be able to:

  • Compare biological immunity to behavioral immunity
  • Describe the Immunity to Change (ITC) method and how it works
  • Identify factors that hinder progress toward a self-improvement goal
  • Consider the challenges faced by teams trying to make meaningful change

Open to all faculty (academic or physician scientists) and their senior staff.
Limited to 20 participants. Participants must be able to attend the entire session.

Details

Wednesday, September 20, 9AM-1PM
Tufts University School of Dental Medicine, 1 Kneeland Street
14th Floor, CE Classroom (1415)

Lunch will be served.

Registration

Please register here by September 13.

 

Seminars & Workshops
Pfizer Investigator Training Program (iTP)

Acclaimed training program begins April 18, 2017

Tufts CTSI will host Pfizer’s acclaimed Investigator Training Program (iTP) on April 18-19, 2017.

This unique, two-day, free-of-charge program will empower clinicians to build critical skills required for the recruitment, management, conduct, and reporting of clinical trials. It will examine the entire trial process, from planning stages to trial close-out activities, and will provide practical recommendations for increasing the efficiency of clinical trial conduct at investigative sites.

Led by clinical trial experts, this interactive training will consist of didactic lectures, discussions, and group activities. The iTP is targeted to investigators and the entire clinical study team, including research fellows, coordinators, research nurses, data managers, regulatory, and IRB members. Clinical trial experience (even if limited) is encouraged, though not required.

Attendees will receive a certificate of attendance after completing this International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH)/Good Clinical Practice (GCP) program. This workshop is approved for 16.5 contact hours towards maintaining an Association of Clinical Research Professionals (ACRP) certification. Contact hours are applicable to CCRCs, CCRAs and CPIs at an entry-level knowledge base.

This is a popular training, and class size is limited, so please pre-register by no later than April 7. You will receive an official email invitation from Pfizer if you are admitted to the program.

Please note: registration is a two-step process. Once you pre-register with Tufts CTSI, you will receive a formal registration form from Pfizer. You must be registered with Pfizer in order to attend this training and receive certification.

Details

Tuesday, April 18, 7:30AM-5:00PM
Wednesday, April 19, 8:30AM-3:30PM
Registration and continental breakfast begin at 8:00AM.

Tufts Center for Medical Education, Room 114
145 Harrison Avenue, Boston MA

Contact

Questions? Please email info@tuftsctsi.org for assistance.

 

Seminars & Workshops
Mentor Training

Tufts CTSI offers Mentor Training for individuals who mentor junior faculty in research. These interactive, two-hour sessions are funded by Tufts CTSI.

Admission to the training is by application only.

Our Spring 2017 Mentor Training will be on Wednesday, March 29 from 2:00 – 4:00PM. It will be led by Karen Freund, MD, MPH, Vice Chair for Faculty Affairs and Quality Improvement, Tufts Medical Center, and Professor of Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine, and Gordon Huggins, MD, Investigator, Molecular Cardiology Research Institute (MCRI) Center for Translational Genomics, Cardiologist, Preventive Cardiology Center, and Associate Professor, Tufts University School of Medicine.

For more information, please view the Mentor Training web page.

Details

Mentor Training
Wednesday, March 29, 2:00-4:00PM
(Location to be announced)

 

Seminars & Workshops
Engaging Stakeholders in Community-Based Participatory Research Partnerships

Seminar slides (PDF)

Interested in identifying potential stakeholders in local communities? what are some effective models of academic-community partnerships in translational research?

Join us for for Engaging Stakeholders in Community-Based Participatory Research, a seminar led by Carolyn Rubin, EdD, MA, Tufts CTSI’s Director of Addressing Disparities in Asian Populations through Translational Research (ADAPT) and Assistant Professor at Tufts University School of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Community Medicine.

Dr. Rubin will discuss how researchers and communities can collaborate to identify and address community priorities in translational science.

In this interactive, 90-minute seminar, you will learn what community-based participatory research (CBPR) is, and why you might pursue it.

By the end of this seminar, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the definition and benefits of CBPR
  • Identify strategies for building authentic, long-term partnerships
  • Reflect on your (or your institution’s) relationships with local communities and potential next steps toward CBPR.

Details

Tuesday, February 7, 9:30-11:00AM
Tufts Center for Medical Education, Room 114 East
145 Harrison Avenue, Boston MA

Or via live, interactive webcast (a link will be provided to those who register).

Registration

All are welcome to attend. Please register here by Tuesday, January 31.

 

Seminars & Workshops
Civic Life and Health Research

Civic Life and Health Research seminar slides (PDF)

What is civic life, and why is it important to consider in clinical research? Understand the relevance of civic engagement to clinical and other health research at Civic Life and Health Research, a seminar by Peter Levine, PhD, Associate Dean and Lincoln Filene Professor of Citizenship and Public Affairs at Tufts University’s Jonathan M. Tisch College of Civic Life. Get oriented to current research and debates about civic engagement in the US; challenge the frequent definition of civic engagement as professionals consulting stakeholders; and instead begin to see medical researchers and health professionals as citizens who should relate to other people as fellow citizens.

By the end of this seminar, participants will be able to:

  • Define the concept of civic life and related terms such as civic engagement, social capital, democratic participation, and community engagement from social science perspectives.
  • Value civic engagement as relevant to the clinical research process.
  • Explore differences in theory and practice depending on whether one thinks in terms of clients, patients, stakeholders, communities, publics, or citizens.
  • Illustrate exemplary actions that investigators can take that involve civic life.

Details

Wednesday, January 25, 9:30-11:00AM
Tufts Center for Medical Education, Room 216A
145 Harrison Avenue, Boston MA

Or via live, interactive webcast (a link will be provided to those who register).

Registration

All are welcome to attend. Please register here.

 

Seminars & Workshops
Mentor Training

Tufts CTSI offers Mentor Training for individuals who mentor graduate students or junior faculty in research. These interactive, two-hour sessions are funded by Tufts CTSI.

Admission to the training is by application only.

Our 2016 Mentor Training will be on Thursday, November 10 from 2:00 – 4:00PM. It will be led by Sarah L. Booth, PhD, Senior Scientist and Director of the Vitamin K Laboratory at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging (HNRCA) and M. Sawkat Anwer, DMVH, PhD, Distinguished Professor and Associate Dean for Research at Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine.

For more information, please view the Mentor Training web page.

Details

Mentor Training
Thursday, November 10, 2:00-4:00PM
Tufts University School of Dental Medicine, Alumni Lounge
1 Kneeland Street, 15th Floor
Boston, MA

 

Seminars & Workshops
CTSA Shared Mentoring Workshop

Agenda

  • 8:00-8:50AM: Breakfast, networking, and registration
  • 8:50AM: Introductions
  • 9:00-10:30AM: Panel discussion, Getting to K and Beyond
  • 10:30-10:45AM: Break
  • 10:45-noon: Exploring Career Opportunities in Translational Science
  • 10:45-noon: One-to-One Mentoring Sessions

RSVP

To attend, please register here.

Details

CTSA Shared Mentoring Workshop
Friday, October 21, 8:00AM-noon
Tufts Center for Medical Education, Room 114
145 Harrison Avenue, Boston MA

This event is hosted by Tufts CTSI and co-sponsored by BU-CTSI, Harvard Catalyst and UMass CTSI.

Seminars & Workshops
Preparing for Patient-Centered and Stakeholder-Engaged Research

Need to incorporate stakeholder engagement into your study, but not sure where to start? Learn how to make your research patient-centered, and find out how engagement fits into your research process at Preparing for Patient-Centered and Stakeholder-Engaged Research. Thomas Concannon, PhD, Tufts CTSI’s Director of Stakeholder and Community Engagement and Assistant Director of Comparative Effectiveness Research, will share his expertise and explain several models for engaging with stakeholders.

By the end of this seminar, participants will be able to:

  • Define patient-centered comparative effectiveness research (CER)
  • Describe the potential value of using Stakeholder and Community Engagement (SCE) and CER frameworks in your research.
  • Identify how engagement fits into the research process based on the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI), Deverka, and Concannon models
  • Discuss the potential value of establishing a partnership with patients
  • Explain how to make your research patient-centered

Details

Tuesday, October 25, 9:30-11:00AM
Tufts Center for Medical Education, Room 114 East
145 Harrison Avenue, Boston MA

Or via live, interactive webcast (a link will be provided to those who register).

Registration

All are welcome to attend. Please register here.

 

Seminars & Workshops
Stakeholder Engagement in Patient-Centered Comparative Effectiveness Research

Seminar slides (PDF)

What is stakeholder and community engagement (SCE), and why is it important? Learn the benefits, strategies, and methods at Stakeholder Engagement in Patient-Centered Comparative Effectiveness Research. This seminar, taught by Thomas Concannon, PhD, Tufts CTSI’s Director of Stakeholder and Community Engagement and Assistant Director of Comparative Effectiveness Research, will review previous patient-centered studies and assess the strengths and weaknesses of their engagement efforts, and their impact on research outcomes.

By the end of this seminar, participants will be able to:

  • Define stakeholder and stakeholder and community engagement (SCE)
  • State different methods for engaging stakeholders and community members in research
  • Outline a framework for SCE utilizing the 7Ps Framework and 6 Stage Model of Comparative Effectiveness Research (CER)
  • Discuss the strengths and weaknesses of SCE in the ACT UP and breast cancer screening guideline examples
  • Identify key lessons learned in the SCE process over time

Details

Wednesday, September 28, 9:30-11:00AM
Tufts Center for Medical Education, 145 Harrison Avenue, Boston MA

Or via live, interactive webcast (a link will be provided to those who register).

Registration

All are welcome to attend. Please register here.

 

Seminars & Workshops
Demystifying Cancer Clinical Trials

Want to learn about, or conduct, cancer clinical trials?

Tufts CTSI and the Cancer Center at Tufts Medical Center are hosting a free 20-hour course for fellows, faculty, research team members, and anyone interested in the process of conducting cancer-related clinical trials.

Documents

Session 1, October 14, 2016
Session 2, November 18, 2016
Session 3, December 16, 2016

Session 4, February 10, 2017

Session 5, March 24, 2017

 

Details

Demystifying Cancer Clinical Trials will take place on Fridays, from 1:00-5:00PM on the Tufts Health Sciences Campus in Boston:

  • October 14 (35 Kneeland Street, 8th Floor, Boston)
  • November 18 (Tufts University Center for Medical Education, Room 114, 145 Harrison Avenue, Boston)
  • December 16 (35 Kneeland Street, 8th Floor, Boston)
  • February 10 (35 Kneeland Street, 8th Floor, Boston)
  • March 24 (35 Kneeland Street, 8th Floor, Boston)

Course sessions will also be videorecorded and posted on Tufts CTSI’s I LEARN website.

Attendees are encouraged to review other courses on I LEARN prior to the start of Demystifying Cancer Clinical Trials.

Goals

At the conclusion of the course, participants will be able to:

  • Explain how to navigate investigator-initiated clinical trial processes in cancer.
  • Discuss how to work with pharmaceutical industries and other for-profit entities.
  • Define investigational new drug (IND) and investigational device exemption (IDE) studies and explain how IND/IDE clinical trials are conducted.
  • State the Principal Investigator’s responsibilities for leading a clinical trial as well as the responsibilities of the research team.

To Register

To attend, sign up here. Participants are encouraged to attend all five sessions.

 

 

Seminars & Workshops
Expert Feedback on NIH Rigor and Transparency Guidelines

Seminar Materials

Seminar Description

Do you have questions about recent changes to National Institutes of Health (NIH) and Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) grant applications regarding scientific rigor and transparency? Get the latest information at Expert Feedback on NIH Rigor and Transparency Guidelines, led by John Castellot, PhD, Tufts CTSI Navigator and NIH Study Section Chair, and Amy Gantt, MA, Tufts University Director of Research Development.

Faculty members who participated in recent NIH study sections will provide valuable feedback and advice on how to include scientific rigor and transparency in your next grant.

Susan Blanchard, Vice President, Research Administration, Tufts Medical Center, will also update participants on the new Department of Labor (DoL) overtime pay protections under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA).

By the end of this seminar, participants will be able to:

  • Describe specific feedback from faculty who served on NIH study sections
  • State how to apply the new guidelines to their grant proposals
  • Discuss how to include scientific rigor and transparency in their grant
  • Explain the implications of the Department of Labor overtime pay protections under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA).

This event is hosted by Tufts University and Tufts Medical Center. Faculty members from both institutions will participate in the discussion.

Details

Thursday, June 23, noon – 1:30PM
Jaharis Family Center for Biomedical Education and Nutrition Sciences, Behrakis Auditorium, 150 Harrison Avenue, Boston MA 02111
Or via live, interactive webcast (a link will be provided to those who register).

Registration

All are welcome to attend. Please register online.

 

Seminars & Workshops
Evaluating Scientific Journal Articles

View the slides for this seminar (PDF).

View the article that will be discussed during this seminar (PDF).

 

What makes a journal article successful?

Join us for Evaluating Scientific Journal Articles and learn the questions you should ask yourself, whether reviewing journal articles or writing your own. This interactive seminar will be presented by Lori Lyn Price, MAS, Statistician in the Biostatistics, Epidemiology, and Research Design (BERD) Center.

By the end of this seminar you will be able to:

  • List the questions you should ask yourself when evaluating a scientific journal article.
  • Identify the specific, testable hypothesis of the paper.
  • Identify what type of study design was used.
  • Evaluate whether the results of the study were affected by bias.
  • Explain why this study was important, what it added to the literature, or how it changed health practice.
  • Appraise the compatibility of the conclusions of the study with the study objectives.

Details

Thursday, April 28th, 2016 1:00 – 2:30PM
Tufts Center for Medical Education, Room 114
145 Harrison Avenue, Boston

Or via live, interactive webcast (a link will be provided to those who register).

 

Seminars & Workshops
Planning for NIH and AHRQ Grant Application Changes

Seminar slides

Seminar handout

Do you know about the planned changes to policies, forms and instructions for National Institutes of Health (NIH) and Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) grant applications submitted in 2016? Beginning in January, these changes will impact how you develop and write your research strategy section. In addition, there are form and format changes to the SF424 application package.

Find out more information and specific details at Planning for NIH/AHRQ Grant Application Changes, led by Tufts University’s Zoya Davis-Hamilton, EdD, CRA, Senior Associate Director of Research Administration and Amy Gantt, MA, the Director of Research Development.

This seminar reviews upcoming changes to rigor and transparency in research, inclusion reporting, data safety monitoring, vertebrate animals, definition of child, research training, appendices, biosketch clarifications, font requirements and post-award changes.

The seminar is split into two sections, the first half will focus on the changes to the research strategy section of the application and the second half will focus on the administrative changes.

By the end of this seminar, participants will be able to:

  • Identify the changes to the NIH/AHRQ policies, instructions and forms
  • Explain which changes are required in January 2016 and which changes will be required in May 2016
  • State details on each area of change
  • Describe how to apply the new guidelines
  • Discuss how to include robust and unbiased results factoring.

This event was hosted by Tufts University and Tufts Medical Center.

 

Seminars & Workshops
Knowing Yourself & Knowing Others: Implications for Leadership and Team Participation

How well do you know yourself? Find out how your approach to the world influences your motivation, leadership, and team participation at Knowing Yourself and Knowing Others: Implications for Leadership and Team Participation.

This workshop by Laurel K. Leslie, MD, MPH, former Tufts CTSI Associate Director for Community Engagement and current Vice President of Research at the American Board of Pediatrics Research, was previously offered in the Women in Medicine/Science Lecture Series and as part of the Community Service Learning Series for medical students.

To learn more about yourself and your interactions with others at this interactive and fun event, please register.

Friday, January 15, 2016, 3:00 – 5:00PM
Tufts Center for Medical Education, Room 114
145 Harrison Avenue, Boston MA

Or via live, interactive webcast (a link will be provided to those who register).