Seminars & Workshops
A Conversation about COVID-19 and Mental Wellness

View the video from this event.

How can the role of women and parents facilitate emotional healing during the COVID-19 pandemic?

Join the Greater Boston Section of the National Council of Negro Women and Tufts CTSI for an interactive, virtual (Zoom) discussion with Marsha Jackson, LICSW.

Marsha Jackson has vast experience providing clinical and therapeutic services for families, children, adolescents, and adults, including 20 years of supervising social workers who conduct case management in the Child Welfare System. She will talk about:

  • The role of women as a core to facilitate healing
  • Behavioral indicators of children and family who are struggling
  • How to maintain emotional wellness
  • Usage of Telehealth/Telemedicine to connect with providers
  • Other resources

Who should attend

All are welcome to attend.

Details

Tuesday, April 6
7:00-8:00PM
Online via Zoom (a link will be sent to those who register).

Registration

To attend, please register here.

 

 

CANCELLED
Center for Quantitative Methods and Data Science Seminar 2021: Sara Lodi, PhD, MS

CANCELLED

This event has been cancelled. We apologize for any inconvenience, and hope to reschedule Dr. Lodi’s seminar soon.

What is the long-term effect of direct antiviral agents for Hepatitis C?

The April seminar of the Center for Quantitative Methods and Data Science (QM&DS), in partnership with the Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Research Design (BERD) Center at Tufts CTSI and the Data-Intensive Studies Center (DISC) at Tufts University, is Wednesday, April 21, 2:00-3:00PM via Zoom. The topic of this month’s webinar is What is the Long-term Effect of Direct Antiviral Agents for Hepatitis C? A Causal Inference Approach Using ‘Big Data,’ presented by Sara Lodi, PhD.

The advent of direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs) in 2011 revolutionized hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment: based on clinical trials and real world data, approximately 95% of patients treated with DAA achieved a sustained virological response equivalent to cure. However, even after cure is achieved, the risk of hepatic and extra-hepatic disease remains. Our understanding of post-DAA clinical outcomes is based on clinical trials with relatively short follow-up and selected participants. However, the extent to which DAA impacts extra-hepatic morbidity in the long-term and in heterogenous populations is unknown. Electronic health records collected in routine clinical practice provide a unique opportunity to estimate the long-term benefits of DAA treatment and to assess the need for post-DAA clinical management.

In this talk, Dr. Sara Lodi will discuss how to design an observational study to estimate the effect of DAA on kidney function using the target trial approach. She will also describe how to apply and interpret the results of the parametric g-formula, a causal inference method that provides consistent estimates in the presence of treatment-confounding feedback. Dr. Lodi will present preliminary results using electronic health records from Boston Medical Center and the HepCAUSAL collaboration.

 

Faculty

Sara Lodi, PhD is an Assistant Professor in Biostatistics at Boston University School of Public Health. She obtained her PhD in Medical Statistics at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine in 2009. Her research focuses on clinical trials, clinical epidemiology and comparative effectiveness research using routinely collected heath data, particularly in the area of infectious disease and substance use. Methodologically, she focuses on statistical techniques for causal inference to estimate effects of interventions along the HIV continuum of care. She has published many articles on behalf of large international collaborations of HIV cohorts such as CASCADE, COHERE, URBAN ARCH and the HIV-CAUSAL Collaboration.

Details

This event is cancelled.

 

 

Seminars & Workshops
Conflict in Research Teams: Prevention, Management, and Resolution

Would you like to learn how to manage conflict as a member or leader of a team-based research project?

In collaborative research, conflict is inevitable. As individuals with diverse perspectives, backgrounds, and personalities undergo the stages of team formation, differences in goals, working styles, and expectations emerge. Failing to address these differences can derail a promising research idea and fracture collaborative relationships.

Learn the strategies to anticipate and overcome conflict in your research from a Team Science methodology in Conflict in Research Teams: Prevention, Management, and Resolution. In this two-session, live online workshop, you’ll hear about common areas of conflict in research teams, learn about frameworks for understanding, discussing, and managing conflict, and practice these skills through role-playing.

Learning objectives

After attending this event, participants should be able to:

  • Assess the state of conflict in their own teams.
  • Describe how a high-functioning team manages conflict effectively.
  • Employ tools and practices to anticipate and resolve common areas of conflict in research teams.

Who should attend

Faculty and research team members who currently work on team-based research projects, or plan to do so in the future, are encouraged to attend.

Details

Monday, April 26 and Monday, May 3, 2021
2:00-4:00PM
Online via Zoom (a link will be sent to those who register).

Registration

To attend, please enroll here via Tufts CTSI I LEARN by April 25.

*If you have not already registered for Tufts CTSI I LEARN, you will be asked to create an account, which can be used to register for all future Tufts CTSI sponsored workshops, courses, and events. If you are not sure whether you have an account, please email training@tuftsctsi.org.

 

Conferences & Symposia
Translational Research Day 2021

Download a handout of our presenter biographies and abstracts (PDF).

Translational Research Across the Spectrum

Interested in learning about how research that spans translational phases leads to discoveries like the COVID-19 vaccines? Mark your calendar for Translational Research Day 2021:

Tuesday, April 27
9:00AM-3:00PM
Online via Zoom

Registration

Please register here to attend.

Keynote

The keynote address will be given by John R. Mascola, MD, Director of the Dale and Betty Bumpers Vaccine Research Center (VRC) at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), National Institutes of Health (NIH). Dr. Mascola will highlight the scientific discoveries that laid the foundation for rapid COVID-19 vaccine development.

Agenda

  • 9:00-9:15AM: Welcoming remarks
    • Harry Selker, MD, MSPH
      Dean and Principal Investigator, Tufts CTSI; Executive Director, Institute for Clinical Research and Health Policy Studies, Tufts Medical Center
  • 9:15-10:00AM: Keynote address:
    • John R. Mascola, MD
      Director of the Dale and Betty Bumpers Vaccine Research Center (VRC) at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), National Institutes of Health (NIH)
      Rapid Response to a Novel Pathogen: COVID-19 Vaccine Development
  • 10:00-10:05AM: Break
  • 10;05AM-noon: Plenary: Scientific talks
  • noon-12:30PM: Lunch break
  • 12:30PM-2:00PM: Concurrent breakout sessions
    • Jonathan Garlick, DDS, PhD
      Director of Science Communications, Tufts CTSI; Director, Tufts Initiative In Civic Science; Professor, School of Dental Medicine, School of Medicine, School of Engineering, Tufts University
      Building Trustworthiness and Vaccine Confidence through Dialogue in COVID-19-vulnerable Communities
    • Kinna Thakarar, DO, MPH
      Assistant Professor of Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine; Attending Physician, Maine Medical Center
      Improving Discharge Decision-making among Vulnerable Hospitalized Patients
  • 2:00-2:05PM: Break
  • 2:05-2:45PM: Plenary: Report-out and next steps
  • 2:45-3:00PM: Closing Remarks
    • Harry Selker, MD, MSPH

Get Social

Look for #TranslationalTufts2021 on social media and join the conversation.

 

Forum
Feeding Communities: Big Challenges, Local Actions

Have you ever wondered how decisions are made about our food system and how you can get involved to support your community?

Join Tufts CTSI and the Museum of Science, Boston to learn about the current challenges in our food system, how food polices are determined, and how you can take part to contribute to a solution. Hear from a panel of experts as they discuss questions such as:

  • What are the biggest barriers to a just food system?
  • What information do policymakers need to make decisions around food justice?
  • How can individuals influence policy change?

After hearing from our panelists, participants can join small group conversations to share their concerns, listen to concerns of others, and discuss what they hope to work on in the future to help feed communities.

Moderator

Laura Reiley, Business of Food Reporter at the Washington Post

Panelists

Jen Faigel, Executive Director and Co-Founder of CommonWealth Kitchen

Greg Watson, Director of Policy and Systems Design at the Schumacher Center for a New Economics

Norbert L. W. Wilson, Professor of Food, Economics, and Community at Duke Divinity School

Details

Wednesday, April 28, 5:00-7:00PM

Online

Registration

Registration is now open!

Please sign up here.