Seminars & Workshops
Disseminating Research Results to Participants and the Public

Does your study follow the best practice of communicating end results to participants? Are you disseminating findings to affected communities that are understandable and actionable?

The new Common Rule (NIH 2017) emphasizes the need for clinical research investigators and teams to provide participants with information they can read, understand and act on. In a recent survey of past clinical trial participants (CISCRP 2019), 68% said they wanted to receive a post-study summary of results they could understand and use, but only 38% reported receiving any such communication.

Applying a health literacy framework supports study teams to meet the literacy, language, and cultural health communication needs of participants and the public. Using plain language writing and design principles enables study teams to develop results summaries that are relevant, understand and actionable.

This 90-minute online workshop, Disseminating Research Results to Participants and the Public, is led by health literacy and plain language experts from Tufts CTSI faculty, along with guest lectures from the Multi-Regional Clinical Trials (MRCT) Center of Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard and the Center for Information & Study on Clinical Research Participation (CISCRP). Participants will learn about health literacy and plain language as a strategic effort to communicate more clearly throughout the clinical research life cycle, practice plain language writing and design techniques to communicate end of study findings, and engage in dialogue and reflection on how to apply lessons learned in practice.

The workshop will use Zoom video conferencing for live interactive learning and the I LEARN course management system to support applied asynchronous learning activities. This online program will be engaging, interactive, and tailored to meet participant needs.

After attending this event, participants should be able to:

  • Define health literacy and plain language as a strategic approach to communication throughout the clinical research life cycle, with a focus on sharing post-study results with participants and the community
  • Apply plain language writing and design principles when crafting written communications at the close of a study that are tailored to needs of study participants and the public (i.e. drafting a letter to participants describing aggregate results or a one-page fact sheets describing relevant findings to the public).

Faculty

Sabrina Kurtz-Rossi, MEd, is Assistant Professor of Public Health and Community Medicine at Tufts University School of Medicine. Kurtz-Rossi has extensive experience teaching with technology and creating engaging and tailored remote learning experiences. She will introduce the fundamentals of health literacy and plain language in health and science communication with the public.

Sylvia Baedorf Kassis, MPH, is Program Manager for Health Literacy in Clinical Research at the Multi-Regional Clinical Trials (MRCT) Center of Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard. Baedorf Kassis will cover health literacy throughout the clinical research life cycle and specifically techniques for communicating results to study participants.

Behtash Bahador, MS, is Associate Director of Relationship Management and Development at the Center for Information & Study on Clinical Research Participation (CISCRP). Bahador will offer further specific guidance and resources on the return of results and will use case examples to facilitate communication of research results to affected communities.

Details

Date: Wednesday, October 7, 2020, 10:00–11:30 noon (90 min)

Location: Zoom video conference and I LEARN course management system

Clinical research investigators and coordinators, and anyone on the clinical research team responsible for communicating results to study participants, are encouraged to attend, especially investigators and study teams with results ready to share.

If you are an investigator with experience sharing study results with study participants and the public, please contact sabrina.kurtz_rossi@tufts.edu so that we may incorporate your experience, questions, and challenges into the content of the training.

To join in this live, 90-minute online event, participants must be able to access the Internet using a device with audio and video camera capabilities. Participants will receive an invitation to join the training live via Zoom and to log onto the I LEARN course management system to access all training materials. Please join the training from a location that has reliable internet access and limited background noise.

Course enrollment priority is given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions.

If your participation needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may provide their contact information when you register for the program.

Registration

To attend, please register here.

Tufts CTSI Professional Education & Expectations for Course Participants

Tufts CTSI’s Professional Education programs provide non-degree continuing education and training for clinical and translational research professionals from all Tufts CTSI partners and beyond.

Course enrollment priority is given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions. If your participation needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may provide their contact information when you register for the program.

This course is provided free of charge and is supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Award Number UL1TR002544.  The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

Conferences & Symposia
6th Annual Asian Health Symposium: A Virtual Event Part 1

Finding Belonging Amidst Neighborhood Development: A Case for the Arts in Boston’s Chinatown

The Pao Arts Center uses arts, culture, and creativity to promote social cohesion and community well-being in an ethnic enclave, Boston’s Chinatown. In the same neighborhood, luxury development may be disrupting the community’s close-knit social fabric and sense of a coherent cultural identity.

A team comprised of Tufts University researchers, Pao Arts center staff, and community residents investigated whether the Pao Arts Center remedies the effects of this displacement. Preliminary findings from the research will be presented.

By the end of this session, participants should be able to:

  • Learn what the research team found about the effects of the Pao Arts Center
  • Understand more about how to do a collaborative, interdisciplinary, community-based research study.

Presenters

Peter Levine, Academic Dean and Lincoln Filene Professor of Citizenship & Public Affairs
Jonathan Tisch College of Civic Life, Tufts University

Cynthia Woo, Director
Pao Arts Center, Boston Chinatown Neighborhood Center (BCNC)

Discussant:
Giles Li, Senior Program Officer
Arts and Creativity, Barr Foundation

Details

Wednesday, October 7, 2020, noon-1:00PM

Online via Zoom (please register to receive the Zoom link and password).

Registration

All are welcome to attend. Please register here.

 

 

This event is provided free of charge, and was supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Award Number UL1TR002544. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

Information Session
National COVID Cohort Collaborative (N3C) Q&A Session

Do you want to learn about the National COVID Cohort Collaborative (N3C)?

Join our virtual N3C Q&A session moderated by Andrew Williams, PhD, Tufts CTSI Associate Director of Informatics. All Tufts CTSI partners and collaborators are encouraged to attend.

Dr. Williams and Tufts CTSI Informatics staff are on the N3C Collaborative Analytics leadership team and lead the Tools and Resources N3C working group, co-lead and contribute to task teams on synthetic clinical data resources, clinical scenarios, data methods, implementation science, and governance. During the session you will hear a short summary about the N3C enclave as a resource and how to access it, with an opportunity to ask questions.

Details

Date: Tuesday, October 13, 2020, 4:00PM

Location: Zoom video conference

Registration

To attend, please register here.

A link to the Zoom meeting will be sent to you.

Questions?

Please email Informatics Program Manager Svetlana Rojevsky, MSc at srojevsky@tuftsmedicalcenter.org.

Conferences & Symposia
6th Annual Asian Health Symposium: A Virtual Event Part 2

Housing and Health: Exploring Perceptions of Housing and Neighborhood among Residents in a Subsidized Boston Chinatown Housing Complex

In this interactive session, a multi-disciplinary team of researchers and community partners seek reactions and actionable next steps based on findings from a natural experiment designed to explore interrelationships of housing and social determinants on low-income families’ well-being.

In 2019/2020, housing lottery “winners” in Chinatown were surveyed along with applicants who were still “waitlisted” for affordable housing. Results include comparisons of housing and neighborhoods, social and community cohesion, and satisfaction with life and life situations between the residents of the new subsidized housing complex and those still on the waiting list.

By the end of this session, participants should be able to:

  • Identify and explore cross-cutting issues for families seeking to stabilize and improve their lives.
  • Discuss implications for local housing providers, developers, and policy makers regarding investing in housing and neighborhoods.
  • Identify actionable next steps for disseminating and/or operationalizing findings.

Presenters

Virginia Chomitz, Associate Professor
Public Health and Community Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine

Angie Liou, Executive Director
Asian Community Development Corporation (ACDC)

Discussant:
Elana Brochin, Program Director for Health Equity
Massachusetts Association of Community Development Corporations (MACDC)

Details

Wednesday, October 14, 2020, noon-1:00PM

Online via Zoom (please register to receive the Zoom link and password).

Registration

All are welcome to attend. Please register here.

 

 

This event is provided free of charge, and was supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Award Number UL1TR002544. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

Conferences & Symposia
6th Annual Asian Health Symposium: A Virtual Event Part 3

Talking about Casino Gambling: Community Voices from Boston Chinatown

This presentation summarizes a study of casino gambling behavior of residents and workers in Boston Chinatown.

The aim of the study was to learn about the trajectory and life context of individual participants’ gambling activity, including how individual participants describe their motivation, nature, and frequency of gambling, and its effects on self and family.

The research was conducted by a university-based research team in partnership with the Boston Chinatown Neighborhood Center, and with the assistance of the Massachusetts Council on Compulsive Gambling.

By the end of this session, participants should be able to:

  • Understand features of gambling behavior and problems, including risk and protective factors, by interpreting interviews of workers and residents in Boston Chinatown.
  • Examine social determinants of gambling problems or addiction, including poverty, job stress, social isolation, and lack of healthy recreational alternatives.
  • Understand the benefits of family-based counseling approaches to address gambling problems in this population.

Presenters

Carolyn Wong, Research Associate
Institute for Asian American Studies, University of Massachusetts Boston

Yoyo Yau, Director of Programs
Boston Chinatown Neighborhood Center (BCNC)

Discussant:
Victor Ortiz, Director
Office of Problem Gambling Services, Department of Public Health (DPH)

Details

Wednesday, October 21, 2020, noon-1:00PM

Online via Zoom (please register to receive the Zoom link and password).

Registration

All are welcome to attend. Please register here.

 

 

This event is provided free of charge, and was supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Award Number UL1TR002544. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

Seminars & Workshops
Center for Quantitative Methods and Data Sciences Seminar: Cody Meissner, MD and Norma Terrin, PhD

The Center for Quantitative Methods and Data Sciences, in partnership with the Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Research Design (BERD) Center and the Data-Intensive Studies Center (DISC) will host a Zoom seminar series on a Wednesday each month from 2:00-3:00PM.

The October session on Wednesday, October 21 will feature Cody Meissner, MD, and Norma Terrin, PhD. They will speak about the promise of COVID-19 vaccines in controlling the pandemic.

Abstract

The discussion will cover approaches to SARS-CoV-2 vaccine development; emergency use authorization (EUA) vs. biologic license application (BLA); acceptable safety and effectiveness; unanticipated serious adverse reactions that occurred following introduction of previous vaccines; and vaccine trial sample size justification.

Faculty

Dr. Meissner is Professor of Pediatrics at Tufts University School of Medicine and Head of the Pediatric Infectious Disease Service at Tufts Medical Center. He is a Consultant to the Committee on Infectious Disease and an Associate Editor of the Red Book for the American Academy of Pediatrics. He has served as a member of the Advisory Committee on Infectious Diseases (ACIP) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and continues to advise CDC Work Groups. He presently serves as a member of the National vaccine Advisory Committee (NVAC) and as a member of the Vaccines and Related Biologic Products Advisory Committee (VRBPAC) for the Food and Drug Administration. He serves as a member of the Massachusetts Vaccine Purchasing Council. He has published over 250 papers on various aspects of infectious disease.

Dr. Terrin is the Scientific Director of the BERD Center at Tufts Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI) and Professor at Tufts University School of Medicine. She has collaborated with clinical investigators, including infectious disease researchers, throughout her career, and she served as Statistics Editor at Clinical Infectious Diseases for 12 years.

Details

Date: Wednesday, October 21, 2020, 2:00-3:00PM

Location: Zoom video conference. To receive the Zoom link and passcode, please email Lori Lyn Price, MAS at lprice1@tuftsmedicalcenter.org.

 

 

Seminars & Workshops
Scientific Manuscript Writing Workshops – Fall 2020

Overview

Need to transform your ideas into a publishable manuscript? Finding it difficult to write alone without assistance and feedback?

Join Tufts CTSI this fall to begin writing and refining the core sections of your manuscript draft with your colleagues and with an experienced editor.

Commit to attending four working sessions and getting your own manuscript draft, and those of your peers, reviewed before each session. Optional service requests are available for one-on-one consultations on general English writing and peer review.

Dates and Location

All sessions will take place online via Zoom (a link will be provided to those who register), on Wednesdays from 10:30AM-noon.

  • Session I: Wednesday, October 28, 10:30-12:00PM
  • Session II: Wednesday, November 11, 10:30-12:00PM
  • Session III: Wednesday, November 25, 10:30-12:00PM
  • Session IV: Wednesday, December 9, 10:30-12:00PM

Registration and Requirements

Ten slots are available for those who commit to attending and submitting their manuscript drafts prior to all four sessions. You do not need to have your actual final study results or references available to get the essential work done, but it would be beneficial for you to have some elements of a work in progress available for review such as the introduction, methods, or results section of a clinical/translational research paper.

Please register here.

The first assignment is due by Wednesday, October 28:

  • Reading: Welch HG (1999) Preparing manuscripts for submission to medical journals: the paper trail. Eff Clin Pract 2:131–137
  • Submit your first draft in Word to ctsitraining@tuftsmedicalcenter.org. Minimum requirements:
    • One- two paragraphs for the Introduction section
    • Several paragraphs for the Methods and/or Results sections, with subheadings
    • Two to three draft tables or figures that illustrate your principal study findings, even if you don’t have the actual final data available at this time
  • Subsequent drafts and peer review are due three business days prior to each session.
Details

Tufts CTSI is excited to recruit up to 10 motivated biomedical and clinical researchers to join a hands-on workshop series designed to get you started on efficient manuscript writing. Don’t miss this chance for face time with Robert Goldberg, PhD to hear his advice on the elements of preparing successful manuscripts for peer reviewed scientific journals including  navigating major journals, scientific writing style, and approaches to sentence composition.

The program is focused solely on hands-on writing exercises and peer review with expert coaching on manuscript style and content. The participants will incorporate class feedback and submit a new draft each session with a goal of polishing each section of their scientific manuscript in the IMRAD (Introduction, Methods, Results, and Discussion) format.

By the end of the series, you will have completed a solid working draft of a manuscript that will be either ready for peer reviewed submission to a journal, or will be close to submission with some additional final polishing needed.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this workshop series, you should be able to:

  • Discuss the core components of a successful scientific manuscript.
  • Identify strategies and steps for completing a full manuscript for peer review submission.
  • Anticipate reviewers’ concerns in discussing and presenting your research and how to best respond to these concerns.

Workshop Faculty

  • Instructor: Robert J. Goldberg, PhD, Professor, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Department of Population and Quantitative Health Sciences
  • Guest instructor: Nicholas Moustakas, MA, Research Development Specialist, Tufts CTSI

Expectations for Homework and Your Commitment

Registration is on a first come, first served basis and priorities are given to members of Tufts CTSI partner institutions. Once the course is full, additional registrants will be put on a waitlist and invited to the next available opportunity. We will confirm your enrollment as soon we finalize the registration list.

Class attendance is critical to this peer review-based format. If your participation in these workshops needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may optionally provide their contact information when you register for the workshop program.

You will be expected to be actively engaged in classroom discussion. We ask participants to come open-minded and be receptive to constructive feedback.

Tufts CTSI Professional Education & Expectations for Course Participants

Tufts CTSI’s Professional Education programs provide non-degree continuing education and training for clinical and translational research professionals from all Tufts CTSI partners and beyond.

Course enrollment priority is given to researchers from Tufts CTSI partner institutions. If your participation needs to be approved by your supervisor or a person responsible for your time release, you may provide their contact information when you register for the program.

This course is provided free of charge and is supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Award Number UL1TR002544.  The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

 

Forum
Community Forum on COVID-19 Research – October 2020

How can we ensure equity with the COVID-19 vaccine here in MA?

Please join us for a community conversation of the National Academy of Medicine Framework for Equitable Allocation of Vaccine on Wednesday, October 28 from 5:00-6:00PM.

The program will include a brief overview of the framework by Dr. Ana Diez Roux who sits on the National Academy Committee, followed by a four-person panel, and closing with a group discussion engaging all in attendance.

This is the first in a two-part webinar series focused on understanding how these guidelines for equitable vaccine distribution should be strengthened and implemented locally once a safe and effective vaccine is available.

Panelists include:

  • Lissette Blondet: Executive Director, Massachusetts Association of Community Health Centers
  • Michael Curry: Deputy CEO & General Counsel, Massachusetts League of Community Health Centers
  • Dr. Sara King: Director, Ummah Health
  • Atyia Martin: Black Boston COVID-19 Coalition

Download the event flyer. 

Registration

To sign up, please register here. A Zoom link will be sent to you.

Questions?

Please email community@catalyst.harvard.edu.